G S Haydon

I can't help but like it

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He may have what it takes to get one of his ideas patented. Then he could sell license rights.

A viewer may get an idea from one of his ideas and do just that.

I've been watching too much Shark Tank I guess.

 

I believe he's considering writing a book.

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Probably Eric, but self publishing these days doesn't have the same stigma attached to it than say 50 years ago. In fact there are quite a few different ways since this new fangled invention called The Internet.

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Probably Eric, but self publishing these days doesn't have the same stigma attached to it than say 50 years ago. In fact there are quite a few different ways since this new fangled invention called The Internet.

 

That's true.  There are a number of self-published authors I hold in high esteem who have used Amazon's program.  I was just takin' a jab at the guy. ;)

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I think his book is more about his faux finishing, distressing and homemade finishes.

He built a table for his $50 workshop series and created the stain from home ingredients. And this video on aging wood was pretty good if you're after that look.

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Personally, I like the videos ... especially the bowling ball.

I'm with Graham, however. His methods, although entertaining, are not for me.

 

I understand the argument that it encourages people to be unsafe in their shops by "experimenting" with tools and using them in ways in which they were not intended. However, I'm a big proponent of personal accountability. So, if somebody does something stupid with their table saw, it's THEIR FAULT not Izzy's. I watched the 3 Stooges a ton as a kid. I never thought hitting a friend in the head with a sledge hammer was actually a good idea.

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I have watched Izzy's work and complimented him on his ingenuity. I don't think his jig's are unsafe, to the contrary I have seen a few jigs he has built to aid his safety while doing something as simple as ripping wood. He clearly puts a lot of thought into his projects before doing them. His philosophy is THINK, which I think he goes to great lengths to convey. Is a lathe a safe machine?? Google lathe accidents.. Will the product he produces on his makeshift lathe rival the quality of his homegrown? Not likely, but again the point is to overcome the obstacles and work wood. I think its a liberating premise. Kudos to Iz. :-)

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The part no one seems to account for is tooth weld failure. Until the bowl is bottomed out on his second cut, there is tremendous room for a ricocheting carbide tooth. The force on the side of the teeth increases the chance of this kind of event. I am not sure the damage capable but I've felt teeth bounce off my glasses before cleaning half laps with a circ saw.

This.

Blades are engineered to have material run parallel to them. They are designed to withstand these forces. Not what this guy does with them

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that guy is truly entertaining, is it dangerous? maybe  just makes woodworking a bit more fun wacthin that kinda stuff  cabinet making,boxoligists,repitition

can get a bit boring after years makes me think of makin a few cool new jigs lol maybe not to turn a bowling ball but nonetheless something creative

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Hey Guys, I am the crazy guy making these videos.  I have found mixed reviews on the safety and responsibility of making these jigs and videos at every turn so its nothing new. Like many of my projects past and future I do not encourage nor discourage people from trying new things. I Just want to entertain, teach a little, and help people understand that wood working is fun and does not need to be an expensive hobby.  I believe in personal responsibility and would offer this saying my father used way to much, 'If you see someone jump of a cliff are you going to the same thing?" lol  I have been involved in woodworking most of my life, so I am used to people offering opinions when they really don't understand the the energy or physics involved in many of my contraption. Those folks are pretty easy to spot so I usually just ignore them.  And for those who lack the appreciation of what I have done with this jig ( You know the ones that say buy a lathe) why would i want to do something everyone else has done that's just plain ole boring!  Check out my latest improvement on this jig in the link bellow.   For the grand price of 25 bucks I have designed and  built a machine that makes it possible do things that  set it apart form any regular lathe on the planet. 

 

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Hey Guys, I am the crazy guy making these videos.  I have found mixed reviews on the safety and responsibility of making these jigs and videos at every turn so its nothing new. Like many of my projects past and future I do not encourage nor discourage people from trying new things. I Just want to entertain, teach a little, and help people understand that wood working is fun and does not need to be an expensive hobby.  I believe in personal responsibility and would offer this saying my father used way to much, 'If you see someone jump of a cliff are you going to the same thing?" lol  I have been involved in woodworking most of my life, so I am used to people offering opinions when they really don't understand the the energy or physics involved in many of my contraption. Those folks are pretty easy to spot so I usually just ignore them.  And for those who lack the appreciation of what I have done with this jig ( You know the ones that say buy a lathe) why would i want to do something everyone else has done that's just plain ole boring!  Check out my latest improvement on this jig in the link bellow.   For the grand price of 25 bucks I have designed and  built a machine that makes it possible do things that  set it apart form any regular lathe on the planet. 

 

Well said Iz, was wondering when you'd get around to us ;-)

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I think the outcomes speak for themselves.  The results are unique and pleasing.  Good on you for being inventive and for putting thought into a device that both makes what you're attempting to and keeps you safe in the process.

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I think this is what Mike Rowe meant by safety third. I am sure Izzy is not doing anything unsafe from his perspective. I do not have the dexterity to boost my confidence that I could pull this off consistently without an accident.

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Izzy, welcome to the forum. I have watched a few of your videos, some of them at work with my "pro" woodworker employees. Although eyebrows were raised it was clear to see they apreciated the creativity you have. My dad was reminded of how his farther used to make a site sawbench as you did with a circular saw through a piece of ply. It is unlikely I could ever use these concepts, butam entertained and impressed with the quality of your videos. Stay safe :-).

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I have to chime in here to ask just what is supposed to be so 'unsafe' about Izzy's jig? It appears to be structurally sound. It clamps to the table, so kickback of the jig itself should be near impossible. Using the jig does not require the hands ( or any body part ) to be near the spinning blade. The external cut requires minimal blade exposure above the table. The internal cut has the blade covered by the work piece. The only legitimate concern I've seen is the possibility of tooth separation caused by lateral force, but this exactly the same force applied when making cove cuts on the TS, and I've never seen any complaints about that. In my opinion, Izzy's jig is less likely to cause an incident than making a simple straight line rip cut. I would certainly feel safer using it than turning a bowl on a lathe, where catching a tool in the grain frequently results in large chunks of wood flying through the air.

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Izzy is my type of woodworker! He is not afraid to try different things or use the machines that he has to accomplish what he wants to do. 

 

You have a new subscriber to your YouTube channel. 

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I have followed Izzy for quite some time and even though I haven't ran out and built any of his projects I'm sure there has been a few things that I have built into my jigs or such because of watching him.

As for the safety, I think he is safer than many out there in their shops and definitely safer than a lot you see on YouTube. I think society has gotten too comfortable with having to blame someone for everything. About 15 yrs ago I chopped up 2 fingers in my biscuit jointer doing just as Norm always did; flip it over and clamp it into the vise, use your hands to feed smaller parts into the blade. I never blamed Norm, I was the one running the tool. Bottom line I feel he does great videos that for the most part I watch because they are fun and I may find a tip or aid that will help me out down the road.

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