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wintersedge

Woodworking Education

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If you wanted an education similar to North Bennett Street or College of the Redwoods but had to gain it via independent study and/or school of hard knocks what tools and resources would you use to get there?

 

This started a little vague..

  1. What books would you study?
  2. Which online instructions would you subscribe to? TWW is a given  :P
  3. Which DVDs are invaluable?
  4. What short term classes would you attend?
  5. What long term(2weeks and greater) classes would you attend?
  6. What projects would teach you techniques and push you to greater heights of learning and skill?

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 

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I would love to use my gi bill to attend a course at the center for furniture craftsmanship in maine. Its right down the road from lie nielsen. I checked the school out when i visited and i was blown away. The gallery was incredible and the students were very welcoming. They took us on a very nice tour. I would also love to take private classes with matt wolfe. I try to absorb as much as i can from the web and books, magazines, but i truly learn hands on. I want that experience soon.

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Check out Marc Adams school in Indianapolis. Classes from weekend to full Master and apprentice programs. Great instructors in many disciplines. Michael Fortune is a goldmine of ideas and skills in furniture making and design.

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Agree with Chip...not to be teacher's pet or anything, but I've yet to find a better source of education online than the Guild.  And it's a great value...the amount of material you get to digest for a hundred something bucks a year is unmatched.  Once you've exhausted the Guild archives and you're feeling more advanced, look into classroom type courses...and get your wallet ready.

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I agree Eric. At first I was hesitant. Seemed like a lot of money at first. I mean, lots of stuff on YouTube and it's free :)

Then I jumped in. Love every moment! Best money I've spent on woodworking!

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I would love to use my gi bill to attend a course at the center for furniture craftsmanship in maine.

I have been applying for jobs in Gent Belgium to open up the opportunity to take a 12 week intensive course. The Center for Furniture Craftsmanship is at the top of my list. I would then go back to work for two years and apply at College of the Redwoods or North Bennett. If that failed then I would apply at CFC.

Trying to find the hours to dedicate a sold 90-120 minutes a day in the shop is getting tougher and tougher. If I am going to jump ship I might as well shoot for the moon and pick a job with 8 weeks vacation to start. During this time I am going full speed absorbing, playing, breaking and fixing as much as time allows.

The crazy part is that I do not want to build fine furniture. I want to build exquisite built-ins, with wifi, color and temperature changes from a smart device in a personal space that is well laid out using cutting edge insulation. Geothermal heating/cooling, that gives a very comfortable life. I am likely rambling now....

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As far as books or even online reading, read everything you can find, then go back and read some of them over again. Once you start actually doing some of the things you read about, you will have a different perspective on what you read.

 

Questions 2 through 5 I have absolutely no knowledge or experience with, so can offer no advice.

 

As for 6, the more different things you can learn and get good at, the easier the next one becomes.  Always do the best work you can, and always strive to do better.

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I don't know how old you are, but I respect the fact you're willing to travel coast to coast while relocating employment.

Some things I have to save for retirement for fear of loosing job security.  Schools like that are expensive and you'd have to relocate temporarily.  I guess an apartment would be the way to go here.    

 

I can't offer any assistance, I just wanted to offer my support and a little admiration.   :)  

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I would search your local high schools. One of our local high schools opens up the shop one night a week to people that are registered for the class and allows them to build a project with the instructor. The registration fee includes the use of the machines and the instructor. You supply the materials. The instructor is great and loves to help people learn.

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I have been eying the rosewood studio courses for the last year, trying to fit them into my schedule.

I have taken private instruction from both tom fridgen and William perry, which were excellent. I also have taken a cabinet making course from my local college, but that was pretty far from fine woodworking. It was a great introduction to the basics like jointing, ripping, planing, using a mortiser, etc. A real "nuts and bolts" of machine woodworking.

I would encourage you to find a local craftsman and see if he/ she teaches.

I am also a member of the guild, and I am quite impressed by the content. I can't imagine there is a better online resource than the guild.

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I would agree with franklin pug.  Look for a local community college to get the nuts and bolts of machine tool safety.  I took intro to woodworking classes at Seattle Central Community College, built a tool box and an independent project with advise from the instructor.  Many school programs also have open shop courses which basically cover machine costs but allows you to experiment before purchasing a shop's worth of tools, an instructor is usually there for safety and advice.  I liked boats so i started volunteering at the Center For Wooden Boats.  Call and visit local shops and furniture makers, call first some of us don't like dropins.  Explore on the cheap before dropping dough...it will also give you an better idea for a direction to head in.

 

I went to the NW School of Wooden boat building, cheaper then than now.  Another school I like because of my familiarity is the NW School of Woodworking, I've heard great things about their 12 week handtool intensive.

 

All this may apply more to a west coaster but if you're willing to make the trip it would be worth it.

 

Books:  Tage Frid teaches woodworking; The Complete Woodworker's companion, Roger Holmes;  Woodwork(ing?) Joints,

 

Don't Buy crappy tools.  One at a time, as you need.  Look for a tool collector club, they usually have yearly get togethers and good usable tools(not collector quality) can be found.

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