Edge trimming planes vs. Shooting boards.


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Hi everyone!

 

It's exiciting when you find out about new tools, well at least new for me. I am relatively new in woodworking, and didn't know about edge-trimming planes, until today when I accidentaly found a video on the web, the video was shot somewhere in Europe, I don't even recognize the language, but I did recognize the tool's name, a LV edge plane.

I believe this planes can be good solution to square the end-grain edge of a not so thick board, and even long end-grain edges wich is something I can't do with a shooting board. Does anybody have some experience using this kind of planes? I am really interested on buying this tool.

 

Thanks!

Kanthøvel - Veritas by gustavsenas in youtube
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I have the LN version of this plane. Honestly, I haven't tried using it on end grain.

I have used it to true up a jointed edge. Works well for that. The only problem is the fence rides against the face of the board, which needs to be flat. So the plane assumes you know how to flatten the face of a board, but not an edge...

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The edge plane only does half of what a shooting board does.  It will make the edge square to the face of a board (what a jointer with a fence will do), but it does nothing to address the squareness of one edge in relation to its adjacent edge (what a miter saw or table saw with miter gauge or a handsaw and miter box, etc will do)...which is the primary job of the shooting board, usually squaring the end grain of a board to the edge grain of a board.  The edge plane is useful mostly to clean up already trued edges, not so much for cutting the joinery itself.

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Hey Calix, 

 

Long grain shooting boards were quite common back in the day, more so than end grain (I think) and were ideal for working on thin pieces. It's a hard call on planes like this. For some woodworkers they may be essential, or there may well be a good reason why Stanley & Record dropped tools like this from their line.......

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Hey Calix, 

 

Long grain shooting boards were quite common back in the day, more so than end grain (I think) and were ideal for working on thin pieces. It's a hard call on planes like this. For some woodworkers they may be essential, or there may well be a good reason why Stanley & Record dropped tools like this from their line.......

Hi Mr. Haydon!

You are right, definetly I can trim an end-grain edge with the tools I already have. Maybe in the near future I'll find a very good reason to buy this kind of planes.

 

Thanks for your comment.

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