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Automatic Switch

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I think folks way over complicate these things. Tool vac switches are cheap and you will never build one cheaper than you can buy it unless your stealing the parts. Some people wire their blast gates to the DC but that destroys the motor with frequent on and off cycles. Our new shop has to be wired so that when any stationary power tool is running the dust collector will start this is mandated by code. The same goes for spray booths the exhaust fan must be on before air is supplied to the dispensing system. A simple current sensor switch inside the panel is really all it takes. Any time there is ample current draw the switch is closed activating a relay. The sensors are cheap and simply slide over the wire and require no connection to the line. We have ours set up to where any 10a draw will power the the DC system and the draw from the DC holds the draw until its shut down manually at break times or end of work day. For a sander vac system its very easy to install a sensor inside a normal wall box with the outlets and as long the vac is plugged in down stream of the sensor it will turn on and off with the sanders. A small vac like a shop vac does not even require a relay you simply connect the vac outlet to the sensors built in switch. None of this is complicated, expensive or dangerous. If you can install a light switch you can easily set up these sort of systems. Our DC system cost less than $50 to set up and took all of about 10 minutes. There is no need to mess with stringing low voltage systems all over your shop to fail down the road. 

 

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Details!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Make ayoutube video!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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The 9993 120v from phenix will power 1/3hp motors like your shop vac. 

http://www.phenixcontrols.com/Current_Sensor/Single_Phase/

The Fasco from cleave will power your dust collector up to 5hp 

http://www.clearvuecyclones.com/supporting-products/36-heavy-duty-motor-relay.html

 

Combine the two to power your dust collector via 110v. 

There are many other manufacturers of the current sensing relays they are popular for HVAC and cheap.

Here is one on amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Suncourt-SW100-Current-Switch/dp/B003ZZDLQM/ref=pd_sim_sbs_hi_1

You just need to watch the amperage if you want to skip the relay.

 

If you want to go hog wild and use amperage to monitor blades the go here and get displays cheap

http://www.crmagnetics.com/Products/CRM1000-Series-P172.aspx

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post-2720-13925627042359_thumb.jpg

Wired up a simple switch and outlet unit that is rated for 20 (once I replace the extension cord end). I made two types of units.

1. The switch provides power to both outlets.

2. The switch controls the top outlet. The bottom outlet is always on.

My work purchased the materials so it was economical. Made each one for about $23. And very heavy duty.

Still looking at the ivac system and replicating that but that maybe a bit far away. This will do for now.

Not really looking to save money but was a fun project.

Typing on cell phone. I appologize for any typing errors.

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If you are asking the question you just qualified for not being able to achieve the goal !

I absolutely, positively, disagree with this approach to life.  Man built it, man can rebuild it or replicate it.

Now.......I may have to get a lot more education than I'm willing to learn.... In this case, yeah, you can buy something easier and cheaper.  TimV recommended this controller a couple years ago.  I bought it and have been very satisfied. If you're a one man shop though You could plug your DC into the Vac Switch portion and then run a wire from each tool to connect together in a common box that has a male end to plug into the switch...again only if you're a one man shop.  Then whatever power tool is connected to the box and is turned on, triggers the DC to come on.

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I absolutely, positively, disagree with this approach to life.

I 100 agree. An individual would get no where in life if they stood by this model

Typing on cell phone. I apologize for any typing errors.

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Don,

Can you give me a Grainger # for the sensor?

What do you want to control? The one in the diagram would be phenix only but depending on what your controlling the options are endless. I won't buy from grainier they are way over priced on most everything they sell.

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TS (220v, 5 HP), Dewalt 735 planer, 15" drill press, Crapsman 6" jointer, and maybe the lathe (1HP 3phase with a VFD).  I have a membership with Farm Bureau Insurance and through the membership, I get a 20% discount from Grainger.  Phenix would be ok though.

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I'd normally agree, too...but I'm with Steve on this one...I leave some things to the pros if it's potentially dangerous.  Electricity is one of them.  I'm comfortable with the basics, but I'm not gonna burn my house down trying to be Mr. Can-Do-Everything.  I wouldn't do surgery on myself either.  I could read books and research how to do it...but I think I'll leave it to a doctor, thank you very much.

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TS (220v, 5 HP), Dewalt 735 planer, 15" drill press, Crapsman 6" jointer, and maybe the lathe (1HP 3phase with a VFD).  I have a membership with Farm Bureau Insurance and through the membership, I get a 20% discount from Grainger.  Phenix would be ok though.

Those would be the triggers. What are you switching. Dc?. Hp?

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DC Hp is 1.5....

 

Come on Eric....you know what I mean...with enough study, you can learn and do absolutely anything.  But I didn't count half#$$ learning something and then striking out. Yes the fire dept will be visiting.  I teach my sons the balance.  you may be able to do/learn this with enough time invested but sometimes you need to know when to eject.  For me and my sons...change your brakes? yep...CV joint...had to do some study initially, but yep again...overhaul the transmission - negative - Dirty Harry said, "A mans' gotta know his limitations"

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I am not sure why we automatically assume that since someone asks a "how-to" question that they know nothing. I think this is just a culture issue. I take electricity very seriously and want to add cautionary advice but don't want to down talk anyone. Sometimes the question is not out of lack if competence but just because someone needs a fresh look at things. I am glad that you all are posting cautionary advice so please do not think I am trying to be super critical.

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Check out the article by Robert Terry in the Jan/Feb 1988 issue of FWW (Volume 68,page 62).  He tells you how to make a dust collection switch and even sells (or sold) the parts for it for 46 bucks.  Of course that was 26 years ago so you'll have to factor in inflation.  Good luck!

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