Pbmaster11

Vertical Sheet Good Storage

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Hello WTO'er,

 

I am working on a way to properly store sheet good vertically. My question is will the sheet good bend or bow if not pressed to keep straight?

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It can if it is really humid, but it takes a while. Not a problem in most places, but in my unheated, uncooled garage in west TN, I have seen a sheet or two sag after standing this way all summer. If that concerns you, just lean your sheets the other direction once in a while.

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I gotta say I'm really surprised Higtron doesn't get bowing storing sheets like that...maybe not a stack of a dozen sheets, since they act to support each other, but a single sheet or two or three?  Every time I lean a piece of ply against a wall for an extended period of time, it bows to one degree or another eventually.  I don't have enough space in my shop to store sheet goods, so I buy only what I intend to use immediately.  But if I were to build a storage unit, I'd definitely at least try to find a way to press them.

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I gotta say I'm really surprised Higtron doesn't get bowing storing sheets like that...maybe not a stack of a dozen sheets, since they act to support each other, but a single sheet or two or three? Every time I lean a piece of ply against a wall for an extended period of time, it bows to one degree or another eventually. I don't have enough space in my shop to store sheet goods, so I buy only what I intend to use immediately. But if I were to build a storage unit, I'd definitely at least try to find a way to press them.

My same thoughts Eric

Typing on cell phone. I apologize for any typing errors.

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Sheet goods should be stored horizontally or even better laying flat with a cover sheet. The best way to store sheet good is to let your supplier store them for you, don't buy them until you need them. All my sheet goods go from the truck to the saw.

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Hey I agree with you guy's that's why I don't store my stuff at your shops :) I got the idea from Cross Cut Hardwoods in Seattle they store their plywood vertically it's easier to inspect the sheets and, slip one out without breaking down a stack of plywood to find the piece you want. Now normally my ply is standing more vertically but, I had just gone through the stack for some sheets for a cabinet project and, no I don't have a huge bowing issue that Eric imagines. I do have a shop that is big enough for a vertical rack I have 9' 6" ceiling height so that's not an issue. Now I buy plywood on sale so if there is a good price on some decent ply I buy more than I need so I have it on hand I don't have to run to town every time I want to do something if I was doing an entire kitchen like PB than I would probably agree with him on only buying for the project but, he's not a hobbyist he wouldn't be building the things I build I do it for fun going to the store to buy plywood isn't all that fun so I like to have it on hand. Pbmaster11 was asking about vertical storage I was showing him my system I'm not trying to talk someone into anything just like that old 70's song lyrics said "it's your thing do what you want to do"

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Hey I agree with you guy's that's why I don't store my stuff at your shops :) I got the idea from Cross Cut Hardwoods in Seattle they store their plywood vertically it's easier to inspect the sheets and, slip one out without breaking down a stack of plywood to find the piece you want. Now normally my ply is standing more vertically but, I had just gone through the stack for some sheets for a cabinet project and, no I don't have a huge bowing issue that Eric imagines. I do have a shop that is big enough for a vertical rack I have 9' 6" ceiling height so that's not an issue. Now I buy plywood on sale so if there is a good price on some decent ply I buy more than I need so I have it on hand I don't have to run to town every time I want to do something if I was doing an entire kitchen like PB than I would probably agree with him on only buying for the project but, he's not a hobbyist he wouldn't be building the things I build I do it for fun going to the store to buy plywood isn't all that fun so I like to have it on hand. Pbmaster11 was asking about vertical storage I was showing him my system I'm not trying to talk someone into anything just like that old 70's song lyrics said "it's your thing do what you want to do"

 

All that stuff from crosscut is warped. :) As are the prices.

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I agree dalrun. It apears that horizontal storage is alway inadequately supported

Typing on cell phone. I apologize for any typing errors.

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You could build a 5 or 10 degree vertical support and deck it to lean sheets on. I would have a stop opposite to it so you could flip a few sheets and clamp them off to allow access to a sheet on the back of the stack. Having a stack fall could be dangerous.

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I had a vertical rack, but with a slightly taller than 8' ceiling, after hanging new shop lights, it was a bear to use. Vertical is really nice for some of the mentioned reasons, but horizontal on a moving cart has its merits too... If your shop is small though, not storing any ply is ideal. All depends on how far your supplier is and if you use sheet goods a lot. I think that the vertical is the absolute best method if you have the height to accommodate it, the surface of the rack itself doubles as a storage area. On mine I hung shelves and put all my finishes up there, made it easy to see what I had on hand.

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One of Marc's early videos shows his plywood storage (pre-evolution?).  I know it was upright, but I do not recall if it was horizontal or vertical.  He also added some veneer presses, to eliminate that awkward 'teenage plywood sag.'  

 

I store the few pieces of plywood I have in the house vertically, and leaning at about a 5 degree angle.  So far the stuff has remained fairly straight (7 months now), but I don't keep much on hand normally.  This stuff is still around because my saws got snowed out, and the plywood snowed in.  Next month, I'll finally be able to fix that.  (Need to trim 2" off all the pieces, so I can fit through the doorway it's blocking.)

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