Inherited from great grandfather - need refurb


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I've gotten a hold of an antique tool box full of tools that belonged to my wife's great grandfather.  I'm not sure of the ages of the pieces.  Some were additions from her grand father.  Posting here for a couple of reasons.  First, I think they're cool and wanted to share.  Second, I'm thinking of refurbishing as much as I can without harming their integrity and building a nice shadow box to display them.  So that brings me to my question.  Looking for suggestions on how to best treat the wood (and even metal) parts of these to clean them up and get them looking as good as possible.

 

The marking gauge and the double handled 12.5 plane are my favorites.  The plane actually has a wood foot on it rather than metal like today's planes.  I'm actually considering using the marking gauge, but would also like to display it.  Debating that one.  

 

So, back to my question on refurbishing techniques...

 

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The 12 1/2 is a scraper plane. I have one just like it ! The handle is rosewood. I am not the most knowledgeable guy on the board for tool restoration tips. Murphy's oil soap on a rag is a good place to start cleaning up the wood parts.

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Some decent stuff in there. Prepare to use some elbow grease!

 

I think Logan Cabinet Shoppe some advice on using white vinegar baths more on that process on this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3lf32wojUM

 

On the wood, a wipe down might be all you need, if it's got bad a light sanding a treat with BLO/danish oil would most likely be the most appropriate way.

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I was thinking about this. Why renovate them to display them? Why not renovate them to use them? If these tools are as old as you say they are, they are probably excellent examples of period tools which are entirely serviceable. They may even be better quality than many of the tools on the market these days (premium grade tools aside).

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Check the tool box for the depth stop, fence and parts for that # 278. If they're there you're very lucky. Even without the additional parts you'll find the #278 is more than worth the effort of tuning up. In my years working as a finish carpenter, my #278 became one of my most frequently used planes.

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