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sneakobaggin

I messed up, help

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I've been working on building up my first pair of speakers over the last few weeks. I finally finished veneering them (my first time veneering, I know looks meh) last night and was eager to get some stain on. So of course without testing the stain on a scrap of veneer first I just started slapping it on there. Immediate regret. Any ideas on how to fix this catastrophe? I can sand them a bit, but I'm not sure it would be enough. You guys will know better than me

Before stain, I like the mappa burl and how knotty it is, obviously my bookmarking wasn't great. Live and learn.
gkAMaQk.jpg

After stain, gross. Lost all the appeal they had. Just look blob like now. I did want them to be a bit darker, used the same stain I have on my desk, but this is not what I was looking for. At this point I don't care if they match anything else, I just want them to look decent.
aYOXzPY.jpg

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I have had good luck wiping with strong solvents like lacquer thinner to pull most of the stain out. Do it outdoors, wear a respirator and gloves, test on scraps first etc.

Depending on the stain paint thinner or mineral spirits might work. Keep switching to a clean rags and hang all the used rags outside to dry.

Try diluting the stain and making test boards. I often dilute stain with the " Natural " stain from the same brand. It has all the solvents , resins and binders without any pigment. Sometimes 2 or 3 coats of diluted stain can be used to creep up on the color you want.

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If Steve's advice doesn't work out for you, I fear there is little else you can try.  But lesson learned and next time you'll test on scrap, yeah?

 

My advice?  That was a nice burl veneer.  Nature grew it that color.  Embrace it.  Let it be what it is.  When you want a darker color, choose a darker species.

 

This message brought to you by the resident stain hater.  Take with healthy dose of that in mind.

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Neutral stain base can enhance the grain in figured woods. It is not as dramatic as BLO or a Danish oil but it does help bring out the curl , flame and birdseyes without darkening substantially . If find I useful under water based finishes that do not add any amber tint that most people have come to expect.

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 Make a sample board with exactly what you have now and finish it all the way just in case you like what you have with finish on it.

 

 What kind of stain did you use? Some stains have a binder in them and after drying overnight are much more difficult to get off. Also, how did you glue the veneer on? If you used contact cement washing the stain down with a strong solvent is probably not a good idea. You will probably be able to get most of the stain off by sanding with 180 grit. Be very careful not to sand through the veneer! Practice this on the sample pieces you made first.

 

 After getting most of the stain off you will probably have to add some thin stain just to even everything out, use a dye stain if possible so you don't loose any clarity.

 

Post again when you get to this point and let us know how it looks and how your samples turned out.

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 Make a sample board with exactly what you have now and finish it all the way just in case you like what you have with finish on it.

 

 What kind of stain did you use? Some stains have a binder in them and after drying overnight are much more difficult to get off. Also, how did you glue the veneer on? If you used contact cement washing the stain down with a strong solvent is probably not a good idea. You will probably be able to get most of the stain off by sanding with 180 grit. Be very careful not to sand through the veneer! Practice this on the sample pieces you made first.

 

 After getting most of the stain off you will probably have to add some thin stain just to even everything out, use a dye stain if possible so you don't loose any clarity.

 

Post again when you get to this point and let us know how it looks and how your samples turned out.

I used an oil based Minwax wood finish.

The veneer was glued on with hide glue, it came in a powder and I had to heat and mix it myself. Not sure what sort of effect solvents would have on that.

I don't have any topcoat picked out yet. Any recomendations for this?

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First order of business:  Take a deep breath and walk away from the project for a spell.  Work on something else, clean up the shop or just leave and come back a few days later.

 

That done, I'm with Rick:  Sand and topcoat.  I remember in Flexner's book that the only time coarse, cheap pigment stains (i.e. Minwax) actually looked tolerable was when applied to expensive, figured lumber.  In a nutshell, you're trying to pop the grain.  Sand as much as you dare, you'll be left with stain that highlights all the figure that the veneer has.  Then topcoat with your choice of a.) shellac, B) poly or c.) lacquer.

 

Good luck.

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Since you used hide glue you should be able to wipe down with acetone after sanding to even out whatever color is left. Then you can apply a dye stain or just finish as is depending on what your samples told you.

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Why use a stain at all? "If" you want to change the color or even just the "Hue" or "Shade"? Use dye from the start. Yeah, it is faster and easier and a bit cheaper. BUT, With "stains"? Your pretty much just "Stuck" if a mistake happens..., As you are..... And "Test Pieces" while nice? They aren't exactly the "Holy Grail" of what you'll end up with because of the differences in wood even when from the same tree!

Use "Dye", It is way easier to control and your NOT stuck with a manufacturers color palette! Just the limits of your imagination. but maybe the best thing? Usually? You can either completely sand off "most", initial mistakes using dyes if you make mistakes, "As we all do"! At worst you may need to stick with the color you first used, "Like I have had to when using Blue" but I can mix the next dye batch differently! I many times will make it into a "Teal", or "Cobalt". And I am NEVER just "Stuck"!

   I, "Just say NO", to Stain!

      Scott

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Welcome to the forums Scott.  You do realize that this is a very old thread and the OP last visited in 2014 so, probably isn't going to see your response.

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Yes welcome.  I'll just mention that adding additional info to existing threads still adds value to the folks who come after us.  I just don't expect to necessarily see any response to my additions.  Again, welcome.

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