Thoughts On Using Rust-Oleum Epoxyshield Basement For Woodshop Floor?


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Hi guys! This is (obviously) my first post here, but I joined the forum because I am an aspiring woodworker and have been very impressed with the videos and tutorials on The Wood Whisperer's website; thanks, Mark :-) I am at a point where I am just beginning to put together what will in time be my humble workshop, and I decided to take the opportunity now to do some repainting before I start building workbenches and shop furniture. I have a small area in our basement that's mostly unfinished, it's about 220 square feet or so, but in that space the furnace, hot water heater, washer and dryer, sump, and work sink must also live. I have cinder block half walls on two of the four walls, drywall on the rest, and a typical concrete slab for the floor. I repainted the drywall, so it looks at least much cleaner, though still not perfect (hey, this is a shop, right?), and I painted the cinder block walls with DryLok basement waterprooofer, which I had tinted blue, and I'm quite happy with that. I would now like to paint the concrete floor, and after some research and reading the reviews, I decided on and have already purchased the Rust-Oleum Epoxyshield Basement Floor kit. But, I do have some questions and concerns about it and its application, and I'm hoping some of the forum members might have had some experience with this product.

 

My biggest concern is with the included paint chips. I think they have a potential to look great, but some reviewers had trouble with them adhering correctly into the paint, and some reported that the paint chips could tear out, taking chunks of the epoxy paint along with it. So I'm wondering if it's worth trying the paint chips.

 

My second question really relates to the first in that in order to do the paint chips properly, you are supposed to work in small 4'x4' sections of floor, spreading the paint, then quickly sprinkling the paint chips in afterward. The instructions suggest you keep a "wet edge" to prevent seems, but some reviewers reported that this was nearly impossible because you would work in 4'x4' sections across the room, and by the time you moved on to the second row, the paint would already be drying, and you basically end up with a noticeable seem every four feet. So I'm not sure the bast way to apply this stuff.

 

So does anyone here have any experience using this product? Would you recommended the paint chips, especially in light of the fact that I want to use this for a hobby-level wood working shop, and will occasionally be rolling carts and sliding potentially heavy machines across the floor? Any help or advice on using this product would be greatly appreciated!

 

Thanks guys!

 

-TheWoodShouter

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This is typically a three part system with a hard clear coat flooded to keep the chips from ripping out. If you want this system, it is a great system. That said, do your research as different companies products will show varying reviews. I would try to find a second person or three to help. One can scatter while one to three paint.

Edit: Pro installers walk in metal frames like ice gear that keeps them from disturbing the bedded chips.

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This is typically a three part system with a hard clear coat flooded to keep the chips from ripping out. If you want this system, it is a great system. That said, do your research as different companies products will show varying reviews. I would try to find a second person or three to help. One can scatter while one to three paint.

Edit: Pro installers walk in metal frames like ice gear that keeps them from disturbing the bedded chips.

Hey, thanks for the reply! I had already enlisted the help of my wife, who will come behind me and sprinkle the chips (if we use them). I thought that would be the fastest/best way to keep that "wet edge" and sprinkle the chips effectively. I was also aware of the clear coat available, and have been considering it, but that kit is even more expensive than the Epoxyshield kit I have now, and covers literally twice as much square feet as I have. As far as I know, the clear coat is not available in a smaller size, at least not from Rust-Oleum in their Epoxyshield line. So I felt like the clear coat would be great, and it would definitely cover the paint chips, but it seems kind of wasteful in my situation. However, my thought was if I do the basement, and if it came out real good, I could maybe see my way to also doing the garage with the garage kit, and then getting the clear coat kit and sealing both my shop and the garage with the clear coat. However, that would then be a much more expensive and a much larger project than I had in mind here.

 

So the question is: am I asking for trouble using the paint chips without using a clear coat over the whole thing?

 

And as far as the spiked shoes - like golf shoes, is what I read about - I think that may cause part of the paint chip problem. I think people may paint their whole space, then go back with the spiked shoes to sprinkle the paint chips, and by that time the paint is starting to set up and the chips don't "sink" down into the paint like maybe the should. Of course, your point that professional painters do it this way can't be denied, and the above is just my speculation after reading many previous reviews of the product at that big online book store. For what it's worth, the basement kit specifically gets very good reviews, but most of the complaints are about the paint chips and/or winding up with noticeable seems in the paint job.

 

Oh, and just one more question, please: is it possible to mix up a small amount of the two part paint in the proper ratio, paint just a portion of the room, let that dry, move everything onto that portion, and paint the other half of the room? The three biggest things I just can't really move out of the room to do this is the washer and dryer and my table saw. My table saw does roll easily (the Ridgid R4512), so I'll do my best to work around these objects as best I can.

 

Right now I'm leaning towards using the chips, and if it seems like it needs it I can consider the clear coat. I'm pretty sure the first part needs to cure for a good week or more before I could do the clear coat anyway. Any more thoughts?

 

Thanks very much for your help!

 

-TheWoodShouter

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Ok, I will try to address these issues. I would not use the vinyl chips without clearcoating. If you just want paint and texture, go for an epoxy paint that just has sand grit for texture. If you want the chips, you will not be satisfied leaving them exposed. It would kind of be like mudding drywall and then not painting it.

As far as problems with the install, I have painted a lot of epoxy paint. The most likely issue with chip adherence is too dry a coat. Epoxy paints offer superior adhesion making it possible to spread the paint "too thin." Since you want to use the chips, I would not try to do the floor in sections unless you can create a transition zone like in a doorway.

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I would avoid using the chips. Finding small parts dropped on a solid color floor is difficult enough...why make it more so?

Well, that's a great point, and one I hadn't thought of previously. My wife was originally turned off by the idea of a stark gray floor, but the Rust-Oleum kit comes with the paint chips, and we both thought that would be a great look. The paint I selected is gray, and the chips are a mix of white, black, and blue specks. Blue is kind of my thing, and I've painted the cinder block walls and the trim around the room blue, and we thought the blue specks in the floor paint chips would really look good. That said, I need to be able to use the space, so I definitely don't want the chips to interfere with moving large objects or machines across the floor. I am less concerned with finding dropped parts, but we've all been there, and it's definitely something to consider. Thanks very much for your input, you've really given me another point to consider that I hadn't considered before.

 

Has anyone else actually used this product, the Rust-Oleum Epoxyshiled basement floor treatment/paint system? I know it's a long-shot, and I appreciate everyone's help and comments, but it'd also be great to hear from anyone whose use this particular system.

 

Thanks to all for reading my post, and I very much appreciate everyone's help with this project!

 

-TheWoodShouter

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I hate to say this but since you are new to woodworking you better get used to it. Trial and error is the only way to find out if something's going to work. Try a little spot under the washer and see what happens. Experience is the best teacher. If everything worked right the first time it would take all the fun out of it.  

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Like any other finish, surface prep is key. A friend of mine had to remove the coating from his entire garage floor, using a 4" grinder with a wire brush, because insufficent prep prevented the epoxy from adhering. Follow the directions closely, and as woodbutcher said, test in an inconspicuous spot first, if at all possible.

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I hate to say this but since you are new to woodworking you better get used to it. Trial and error is the only way to find out if something's going to work. Try a little spot under the washer and see what happens. Experience is the best teacher. If everything worked right the first time it would take all the fun out of it.

That sounds like some sound advice. I'm really torn because my wife and I both like the look of the chips, but I'm worried they are not appropriate for a workshop floor for all the reasons I've talked about above. But I'm leaning towards trying to use the chips, and if need be adding a clear top coat to seal everything.

Would anyone know if the clear coat is available in a smaller size than the $100+ 500 square feet package I've seen at the home centers? Or is there another brand Or product I could use for the clear coating? The Rust-Oleum kit is more than twice as much clear coating as I'd actually need, and that seems kind of wasteful to me.

Thanks guys, I really appreciate the help!

-TheWoodShouter

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Whatever product you use be sure to apply the final clear sealer. It protects the paint surface and significantly improves durability.

OK, at this point I think I should either go without the paint chips, and in that case I would expect to not have to use use the clear coat based on what other Epoxyshield reviewers have said. Or, I will try the chips knowing that I will most likely have to apply the clear top coat afterwards. The biggest problem I have with the clear top coating is that it seems to me that Rust-Oleum only makes the clear coat kit in a size that's twice the price of the Epoxyshield floor paint kit I already have, and it covers more then twice as much floor space as I have to cover, which just seems like a huge waste to me. Does anyone know if Rust-Oleum makes the clear coat kit in a smaller size? Or, is there a completely compatible product from another manufacturer I could use instead?

 

Thanks guys, I really appreciate the help!

 

-TWS

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As stated above, prep is the key...

 

I’ve now coated four shop spaces totaling around 18Ksqft. After seeing what’s involved to get a quality epoxy terrazzo floor, I’ll make a plea to hire a pro. Things are quite different with new construction and the experienced DIYer could expect good success, but coating existing construction is much more involved…

 

For existing construction, the pros use a mechanical surface abrader and acid treatment to prep the surface and extract any/all contaminants that compromise adhesion. If you shop around, you can get an epoxy terrazzo floor for about $6/sqft. That may sound expensive, but when you see what’s actually involved, it won’t seem so bad…

 

It takes a three-person crew around four days to coat one space: abrading, treating, prep, etc on day one, leveling coat on day two, anti-slip/terrazzo on day three and top coat on day four… For around a 1Ksqft space, the crew works 8 hrs on day one and around 3 hrs on days two-four. The coatings themselves are around $2-$3/sqft and you’re paying about $4/sqft for labor…

 

For me, it's always been worth it… I went Joe-DIY on one space and the coating didn't last much beyond five years until it started chipping... The pro-jobs are going strong after twenty... Point is, once the shop is setup and machinery bolted to the floor, recoating is a bitch...

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4-square, thank you very much for your suggestion, I understand where you're coming from, but what you are describing is simply far too expensive and involved for what we are looking for here. I think I'm just going to use the Epoxyshield kit I already have, and hope for the best. If it starts to peel in a few years, then you can say "I told you so" ;-)

Thanks for the help though!

-TWS

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I'm sorry, but my post was specifically about using the Rust-Oleum Epoxyshield floor paint kit, which I already have, and I still plan on using. No one asked about professional installation and the like, I asked for experiences with the Rust-Oleum product. No one is griping about the cost of anything, but it's seems terribly wasteful to buy the huge clear coat kit only to throw away over half of it. So again I will ask, does anyone know if the clear coat comes in a smaller size than the 2 gallon kit? Or, is there another compatible product?

Thanks!

-TWS

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Hi, I used the same kit that you are talking about and you do not need to worry about the clear coat for a shop.  Mine is 4 years old and wear has not been a problem.

Wow, thank you so much for your reply! I was really hoping for some first hand advice about the Rust-Oleum kit, so that's really reassuring to read about your experience. The stuff gets great reviews everywhere I've looked, with a few reviewers complaining about the things I've mentioned above. Can I please just ask you if you used the included paint chip flakes or not?

 

Thanks again for your help, I really appreciate it!

 

-TheWoodShouter

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I've used the product you have and my only install issue was I didn't get the flecks distrubuted evenly, simply a looks issue.  I didn't clear coat it and have succesfully chipped dried glue off with out a problem.  Yes, good surface prep is a must.  As mentioned earlier one down side is finding small lost parts.  The other is that i need to wear griperer (?sp) shoes.  THe floor can be slippery more so with saw dust on it.  If asked I'd say I would do it all over again.

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Wow, thank you so much for your reply! I was really hoping for some first hand advice about the Rust-Oleum kit, so that's really reassuring to read about your experience. The stuff gets great reviews everywhere I've looked, with a few reviewers complaining about the things I've mentioned above. Can I please just ask you if you used the included paint chip flakes or not?

 

Thanks again for your help, I really appreciate it!

 

-TheWoodShouter

Yes, I used the flakes. They are very light and seem to melt right into the paint.  I do not know if thats a good way to explain it other than pointing out that the flakes did not seem to add much texture to the finish.

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I also want to point out that I used the two part system that does not require a top coat. That one is durable enough that I think a clear coat on top would be a waste of time and money.

I've used the product you have and my only install issue was I didn't get the flecks distrubuted evenly, simply a looks issue. I didn't clear coat it and have succesfully chipped dried glue off with out a problem. Yes, good surface prep is a must. As mentioned earlier one down side is finding small lost parts. The other is that i need to wear griperer (?sp) shoes. THe floor can be slippery more so with saw dust on it. If asked I'd say I would do it all over again.

Hey guys, thanks so much for replying to my thread! I'm sorry that I didn't reply sooner, but it's great to hear such reassuring news about the Rust-Oleum Epoxyshield Basement floor kit. I read LOTS of reviews about this product before I bought it, and I have had high hopes, but your replies were exactly what I wanted to read. I was already planning on forging ahead with this whole project, but life and work have gotten in the way. I hope to get the floor prepped and ready for treatment in the next few days to a week. I will definitely post details, updates, and pictures of my project, good or bad, so that others may learn from my experience with the Rust-Oleum kit. Thanks again, I really appreciate the input!

-TheWoodShouter

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Oh, and to Beerboss re: your "slippery surfaces", I'm obviously not speaking from first hand experience just yet, but "slippery" was also one of the few knocks on this product that I read about. And by that I should say that most of what I read said the floor was slippery only when wet. My understanding is that this problem is easily overcome by the addition of a relatively inexpensive product also offered by Rust-Oleum that is a "no-slip" additive. Basically, a "special" sand that can be mixed into the Epoxyshield floor paint. Is it OK to post a link or picture of the products I'm talking about? I don't want to break any forum rules. But anyway, there's a sand-type product you can mix in to help with that. From the reviews I've read, I'm considering using the product but at about 1/3-/1/2 the recommended amount; just enough to help with that slip, but not so much as to give an overly textured look to the finish.

It's great to hear from those of you that have used this Rust-Oleum product, and if anyone else has any suggestions I'd really welcome your opinion. Again, as soon as time allows I hope to forge ahead and paint my humble shop floor with this prodcuct, and I will post my results as well.

Thanks again to everyone for taking the time to read and consider my post, I really appreciate it!

-TheWoodShouter

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I have used this exact product.  Mine was on new concrete.  As stated, prep is the key. Since mine was new concrete, I washed only once but after using the etching acid, I had to rinse several times to remove all the acid residue.  I had one helper and basically just kept behind him a little ways with the chips and kept a continuous  flow going, if this makes sense.  I highly recommend using the chips if only for your concern of a big grey bland floor because it does help as it does look ugly without them (in my opinion).  We did mine in about 3 hours and I am extremely happy with it.  We did it one evening and other than a lost duck (yes, duck) that decided to walk in and inspect my wet floor it turned out great.  Just painted over the duck prints, chips and all and slung more chips down and you can't even tell where it was.

SToutage181.jpg

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I have used this exact product.  Mine was on new concrete.  As stated, prep is the key. Since mine was new concrete, I washed only once but after using the etching acid, I had to rinse several times to remove all the acid residue.  I had one helper and basically just kept behind him a little ways with the chips and kept a continuous  flow going, if this makes sense.  I highly recommend using the chips if only for your concern of a big grey bland floor because it does help as it does look ugly without them (in my opinion).  We did mine in about 3 hours and I am extremely happy with it.  We did it one evening and other than a lost duck (yes, duck) that decided to walk in and inspect my wet floor it turned out great.  Just painted over the duck prints, chips and all and slung more chips down and you can't even tell where it was.

SToutage181.jpg

Wow! Thanks again for your first-hand account of this product, and for posting a picture of your finished floor; it looks really great! I understood everything you're telling me, including how the all gray floor would seem kind of ugly, and about painting and sprinkling in basically a continuous motion. That was my plan too, and I"ve already got my wife recruited to help with this. Based only on the reviews I read, I think the mistake people make with the chips is waiting too long to put them on. I believe if, for example, you paint the whole floor and then go back with those special spiked shoes to sprinkle the chips, you've waited too long, and the chips will not adhere correctly. Again, that's just my belief from reading the reviews, and so I too will try to apply the chips quickly as we go as I think the look is great - as your picture proves.

 

I also understand that once mixed the paint has a pot life of about 11 or 16 hours or so, I forget exactly. But it's long enough to paint at night, let it dry overnight, and then touch up any flaws as best as possible in the morning. We don't have any ducks wondering around, but we do have a wide variety of critters in our house, including dogs, cats, and reptiles, so just in case one of them gets in that room before the paint drys we can try to fix it. Good to know ;-)

 

EDIT: Coxy, could I please ask what is the approximate square footage of that area you painted, and how many gallons or kits did you use? I know this stuff goes further on new concrete, but your space looks to be much larger than my area. Thanks!

 

Could I also please clarify what is the best way to prep the floor first as I'm definitely ready to get started on this now? For the record, my floor is not new, it is old, but it's in very good shape, I'd say. It's never been painted or sealed, and there's zero issues with moisture. It is a little dirty, and I'm sure it would benefit from a good cleaning/degreasing first, but I'm not sure how to do this. My idea was to first vacuum well, then simply use a good household detergent soap, water and a stiff deck brush, give it a real good scrubbing, and letting it dry completely. Then, I would use the acid etch product that I think Rust-Oleum makes for just this purpose. My understanding is that the etch really helps prepare the concrete surface so the floor paint will adhere correctly. Is that all true?

 

Thanks very much, I really appreciate the help!

 

-TWS

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Sounds like your plan is right on.  Definitely make sure it’s clean.  I believe there are recommendations on what to use in the directions.  My shop is 24 x 32 outside dimension so about 760 sq. feet inside. I believe the systems come in one and two-gallon sizes.  I used one of each and had about a quarter gallon left.  I have had zero problems with the chips lifting.  As a matter of fact, as I added them as soon as we painted the floor, they seemed to have "settled" into the epoxy.  I have had no issues with cleaning and sweeping. 

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