question about sharpening stones


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I'm going to be getting a couple combination waterstones at least as a starter set for sharpening, I am a bit tired of using sandpaper.  I've looked at the Norton "starter set" for about $138 but I di

I use the cheap $45 or so combo stone from woodcraft, and a regular dmt coarse stone for flattening. And I use a vertias honing jig. Never had a problem. I've thought about upgrading, but there isn'

The only way I've seen to even come close to beating TfJ prices on the high end stones, is to have a friend that's going through Osaka anyway.  TfJ prices look to be 20 to 25% cheaper than anywhere el

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==>strop eliminates a lot of re-honing

Stropping single bevel edges is not best practice...  Here's something just as fast and will leave a better edge....

 

Diamond lapping paste on scrap MDF: http://www.knifecenter.com/item/DMTDPK/DMT-DPK-Dia-Paste-Diamond-Compound-Kit-of-1-3-and-6-Micron

 

From dull edge to re-honed in under 2 mins: Get some scrap MDF from pile, squirt a small line of paste, lap for 30 seconds, toss MDF, back to work…

 

I happened to list DMT's product -- but you can get lapping paste for quite a bit less... I think my last supply came from McMaster-Carr...

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I find that using the strop eliminates a lot of re-honing. I hit my tools with a stone maybe once or twice a year, but strop fairly often. It keeps the edge highly polished, so unless I nick something, stoning just isn't needed.

I see what hhh had to say about diamond lapping paste but I also work with leather and have plenty to spare and jewelers rouge at my disposal...

 

I've seen may debates as to which side of the leather to use... smooth-skin side or the rough-back side.  Can you share what you have found works best?  I'm leaning towards the smooth skin side, that seems to make the most sense. 

 

This thread has been a great read.  Thanks to all that contributed!

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==>strop eliminates a lot of re-honing

Stropping single bevel edges is not best practice... Here's something just as fast and will leave a better edge....

Diamond lapping paste on scrap MDF: http://www.knifecenter.com/item/DMTDPK/DMT-DPK-Dia-Paste-Diamond-Compound-Kit-of-1-3-and-6-Micron

From dull edge to re-honed in under 2 mins: Get some scrap MDF from pile, squirt a small line of paste, lap for 30 seconds, toss MDF, back to work…

I happened to list DMT's product -- but you can get lapping paste for quite a bit less... I think my last supply came from McMaster-Carr...

Consider that hair thoroughly split. Are you really nay-saying the practice of stropping or merely updating the practice with modern material?

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stb,

When I was using the Norton stones, and that same plate with sandpaper to flatten them, I kept trying

coarser grits. 220 will work, but it will be really slow. I got to 80 and stopped there because it was

really fast, and if anything, it

made the stones cut faster. Even the 8000 still cuts just fine after flattening with 80 grit. When you

first flatten a

new Norton, you will probably see that it's not

flat to the corners. I wouldn't worry about going all the way to the corners until you get there on the

next flattenings.

I've never stropped an edge. With the fine stones, you really don't need to. It only takes a few strokes on them anyway. I don't know about longevity one way or the other. The only gauge I can really remember was one day inlaying pieces into a White Oak floor all day. I remember I rehoned the one chisel I was

using three times that day on the 8,000 stone. My back was a lot worse off that day than the chisel, at

the end of the day.

The plumbing tools are next to the sharpening sink, so I grab the trigger igniting propane torch to dry

whatever just got sharpened.

Anyone have any ideas about the weird formatting, and text not wrapping issues I'm having?

Tools for Working Wood selling stopping stuff if anyone feels the need. I never have.

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the way I see it, stropping can't be terribly bad as paul sellers makes lovely shavings with restored planes all the time, and he seems to swear by it...

 

TK, thanks for the tip I will definitely look to coarser stuff if the 220 doesn't work but from what I can tell the norton 4k is pretty flat now, so is the 1200 for that matter.  maybe I lucked into a good one :).  Today turned out kinda crazy so I didn't get into the shop to do much more than clean up some (long story, if you read my fire thread you might know - spent a few hours cleaning up stuff that is drying in my garage rather than woodworking). 

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==>Consider that hair thoroughly split.

Not really... Big diference between stropping on leather and lapping paste on MDF... One is great for a quick touch-up on single bevel tools and the other will likely do more harm than good...

 

 

==>Are you really nay-saying the practice of stropping or merely updating the practice with modern material?

Covered sharpening workflow in some detail, but can’t search for topics prior to Dec’13, so the details covering stropping are out there in luminiferous aether...

 

30K flyover---

 

For the vast majority, stropping a single bevel edge probably does more harm than good. If you want to give it a try, have at it... Cost of entry is very low...

 

If you’re maintaining double-bevel tools, then stropping is probably a push… If you maintain profiled edged tools, stropping can help manage the wire edge…

 

For the hobbyist that sharpens occasionally, lapping paste on MDF is decidedly safer – little risk of overworking the steel and/or rounding the edge and/or corners…

 

 

==>Tools for Working Wood selling stopping stuff if anyone feels the need

I've got their stropping gear --- it's good stuff... Use it all the time......on my double-bevel carving gouges...

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I see what hhh had to say about diamond lapping paste but I also work with leather and have plenty to spare and jewelers rouge at my disposal...

I've seen may debates as to which side of the leather to use... smooth-skin side or the rough-back side. Can you share what you have found works best? I'm leaning towards the smooth skin side, that seems to make the most sense.

This thread has been a great read. Thanks to all that contributed!

I use the smooth side. Some folks use compound on a slab of MDF.
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The only way I've seen to even come close to beating TfJ prices on the high end stones, is to have a friend that's going through Osaka anyway.  TfJ prices look to be 20 to 25% cheaper than anywhere else I've seen.  There is no "best' for every user.  There is always some compromise on hardness, feel, quickness of cut, and price.  This includes the full range, from oil stones, to diamond. The best waterstones for me cut almost as fast as diamond, still have some feedback, but don't have to be flattened every time you use one, and don't cost double what one that is very close costs.

 

To quote a friend, good enough is good enough, but better is better.  I'll add, once you have better in your hands, the bar for good enough is raised to better.

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