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Metric

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I sometimes use the metric system for work when a client requires it or I am doing work on a project that is outside of the USA.

For woodworking I have never used the metric system.

Having used both, I would switch over to the metric system if everybody else would but I am fairly confident that this will never happen in my lifetime.

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just saying that none of these metric using countries have made it to the moon. :lol:

that said i tend to use both systems for various things. when i was an engineer i would use primarily english, but not always, and now that i am a doctor, i tend to use metric, mostly for dosing meds, measuring small moles.....  then to top it off i will describe the size of things in relation to common objects, that mole is about the size of a dime,  that cyst the size of an egg...

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Same here.  I can tell a 6' board from a 7' board at a glance, but working in metric I either have to convert to feet and inches in my head, or spend equivalent time picturing what 13 centimeters would be.  If everything I bought was sized in metric, I'd probably get used to it pretty quickly.

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I turn in metric, because I learned from Australian authors, but when everything I work with is board feet of x/4 material, it would be silly even to try metric.

 

I was in school during the transition.  To this day, I use Celsius for most of the school year, but when it is warm I switch to Fahrenheit.

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Sometimes when I need more accuracy I run an entire job in metric. It forces you to work to a smaller scale. Probably takes me 15 minutes to swap the scale on my crosscut table and zero it out. Grab metric tapes and the Wixey scale on my tablesaw fence just have to push a button.

A client recently had a full set of plans that were all in Millimeters with exact sizes for every part. And we were building it from Baltic Birch which is metric size and thickness.

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As a Canadian, we are raised on the metric system.  All measurments taught in school are metric, and it makes sense.  The metric system is all multiples of 10, and this makes conversions very easy.  I dont know how americans keep track of how many ounces in this, or yards in that.  Most countries use metric, and I am unsure why the USA holds on so tight to imperial.  The same issue exists with celcius (again 100 parts in the scale, water freezing at 0 and boiling at 100) and fahrenheit (32 for freezing?).

 

Of course, the lumber and construction industry have never converted, probably due to our relationship with the USA.  I never really nothered with inches and feet until I started woodworking.  I feel comfortable working in both, but much prefer the imperial system when working wood or doing DIY, as I am so accustomed to it now.

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I come from a long of machinists and tradesmen. Metric is the absolute devil to them. I have no issues measuring things in 32nds or 64ths if I need to go with stuff that small. 

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As a Canadian, we are raised on the metric system.  All measurments taught in school are metric, and it makes sense.  The metric system is all multiples of 10, and this makes conversions very easy.  I dont know how americans keep track of how many ounces in this, or yards in that.  Most countries use metric, and I am unsure why the USA holds on so tight to imperial.  The same issue exists with celcius (again 100 parts in the scale, water freezing at 0 and boiling at 100) and fahrenheit (32 for freezing?).

 

Of course, the lumber and construction industry have never converted, probably due to our relationship with the USA.  I never really nothered with inches and feet until I started woodworking.  I feel comfortable working in both, but much prefer the imperial system when working wood or doing DIY, as I am so accustomed to it now.

 

 

32 for freezing, 212 for boiling. 

 

The base 10 system of metric is much easier to do mathematically, whereas imperial is base 2. 

 

10, 100, 1000 is much easier than 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, etc

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==>All measurments taught in school are metric

Same in the US (or at least it was for me)... From Grade School through Grad School -- all Metric... In the workplace: in/ft/yrd...

 

I'd love to work in Metric, but I can't "think" in Metric... So I look at a board and read 6' in my head, but have to think about the conversions... Actually, I use a dual-scale tape measure in the shop, so I just use that for quick conversions that are far more accurate than I can do in my head...

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Metric is easier to do math with because we all learned base 10 math in school. Imperial inches make sense in practice because each subdivision is 1/2 the previous unit. Its easy to cut something evenly in half, much harder to divide it into 10 equal parts. Also helps that common imperial units of inch and foot are easy to estimate by comparing to bodyparts.

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I would love to find plans for something i want to build and do it strictly in metric measurements.

Seems it would be difficult to transfer the plans from one to the other though.

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It don't really matter. I find units of 10 easy. Measuring is just a standardized language. If you've spoken imperial your whole life speaking metric is likely a waste of time. Wonder if they'll ever offer metric clocks?  :)

 

metropolis_fritz-lang-1.jpg

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A point of reference I rarely quote "height of a horse's ass" but will do so from now on. 

 

I'm here to help in any way possible.  :D 

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I'm here to help in any way possible.  :D

Actually the height of a horses ass is measured in hands not feet, inches or millimeters.  Maybe we should switch to wood working in hands. :(

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Ever seen a metric drive ratchet? No, 1/4, 3/8,1/2" drive is still the norm. So the metric system hasn't really taken on completely

Steve

 

Do you mean socket sets?  I have  2 metric sets for working on my car (Canadian "made" Toyota).

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It don't really matter. I find units of 10 easy. Measuring is just a standardized language. If you've spoken imperial your whole life speaking metric is likely a waste of time. 

 

 

 

 

This is an excellent point, really.  As long as we get there in the end, it doesnt really matter how we measure.  It would be nice if we all spoke the same measurement language though.

 

There are still a few terms of measurement I find amusing.  Stone, and fluid vs solid ounce.

 

There are still lots of instances where metric has not taken over.  CDN football uses yards, and not meters, for example.  I do like the idea of a metric clock - "I'll meet you at 14:87 at the coffee shop".  LOL

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