Ideas for breaking down rough lumber?


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Now that I have a bigger shop I don't have as much need for my UTS. I have a dedicated router table, rarely use my miter saw, and now have a Festool sanding system so the downdraft table isn't really needed. That one thing it is great for is breaking down rough lumber with the open center and clamping channels. I have a friend that will buy it from me if I sell it, and if I can come up with a new way to break down rough lumber, will let it go.

 

Here is what I do now. Any new suggestions if I sell it other than a couple of sawhorses where boards fall once cut? 

 

utsLG-14.jpg

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What type of outfeed do you have for your table saw? If I need to chop up some lumber to rough length, I usually lay it across my outfeed/assembly table and my table saw. There is a small gap between them that I can run my hand saw, or circular saw in.

 

http://i2.wp.com/dlgwoodworkblg.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/DSCN0177.jpg

 

That link is a picture of my setup. The table saw is almost out the shot on the right. But you can break down rough lumber lots of ways. 

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Depending on length, often I'll throw the piece on my large ts sled and cut that way. You could get a piece of thick foam insulation and use a circ saw like many use to break down sheet goods. Could use sawhorses and roller stands to give each side two points of support to keep them from falling.

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I have the space for breaking down ply, but getting it home in a full sheet is problematic.  I usually have them do a couple basic cuts to break it down, then I will make more precise cuts when I get them home.  

 

For rough stock, I usually clamp the work piece to my bench, use a couple scraps to lift it up so that I don't cut into my bench, and make the cut with a circ saw.  There are a couple corded smaller circ saws available now, I have been considering buying one of those for breaking down 4/4 stock.

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2" foam over the tablesaw and outfeed table, tracksaw. I cut a sheet of 2" foam into a 2x8 and (2) 2x4 pieces . It's pretty easy to arrange it to support long & wide boards as well as sheet goods. I've got a 30" by 60" table on wheels at tablesaw height that's real handy to support heavy stock on the infeed side if I'm ripping.

I have a sliding crosscut table on one of my Unisaws which can handle an 8 or 10 ft plank pretty easy but any longer and I use the tracksaw. Used to use a homemade straightedge and a skilsaw.

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I only cut an 1/8 into the foam usually. The foam doesn't add to the mess much. The vac picks up a great deal of the dust while I'm cutting. That's the same set up I use for 14' glue line rips too. Scraps of the same thickness wood being cut supports the excess track and makes things stable and easy for 1 man to handle.

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What type of outfeed do you have for your table saw? If I need to chop up some lumber to rough length, I usually lay it across my outfeed/assembly table and my table saw. There is a small gap between them that I can run my hand saw, or circular saw in.

http://i2.wp.com/dlgwoodworkblg.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/DSCN0177.jpg

That link is a picture of my setup. The table saw is almost out the shot on the right. But you can break down rough lumber lots of ways.

No gap but plenty of surface to clamp to

IMG_0428.JPG

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No more than the saw dust you'll already be vac'ing up. :)

Added bonus, no problems with gravity.

You using white or pink stuff? I've always found those white insulation balls a PITA to try and sweep up, especially if you sneeze!

But insulation would be good for both sheet and hardwood breakdowns.

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I do most of my rough crosscuts on the miter saw unless a board is really gnarly, which it rarely is because I generally don't buy those boards...but in that case I'll break down with the jigsaw and just support the off-fall with my free hand.  In the rare case the off-fall is too big for that I'll set up saw horses or some other jury-rigged contraption.  Very rare need for that.  Rough rips on the bandsaw.

 

If I had endless shop space I think I'd keep that contraption you built, Mike...looks quite handy.  You might hold onto it until you have a good reason to make more space.

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I do most of my rough crosscuts on the miter saw unless a board is really gnarly, which it rarely is because I generally don't buy those boards...but in that case I'll break down with the jigsaw and just support the off-fall with my free hand. In the rare case the off-fall is too big for that I'll set up saw horses or some other jury-rigged contraption. Very rare need for that. Rough rips on the bandsaw.

If I had endless shop space I think I'd keep that contraption you built, Mike...looks quite handy. You might hold onto it until you have a good reason to make more space.

Eric after thinking about it last night I agree with you about keeping it. Those channels are great for clamping my Leigh jigs, Kreg, etc.

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