Setup/accessories for 14" bandsaw for just curves


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I've been on the CL lookout for a used 14" bandsaw I can use for just curves and finally got one. The fence looks to be junk and I'll probably remove it since no need for curves. I have some questions:

 

1. Anyone use the Carter Stabilizer? It replaces the upper guide and you remove the lower guide. The demos look pretty good and it can handle 1 - 6" stock.

http://www.carterproducts.com/band-saw-products/band-saw-stabilizer/standard-model-1-std1

 

2. It is currently wired for 110V/10A but can also run 220V/5A. Any benefits to switching it over?

 

3. Would a 1/4" 6 TPI blade but good to keep in it full-time?

 

4. The dust port is 2" OD. Would running my cyclone to it work with 4 -> 2 reducer at machine? Any ideas on making it better? Hook up Festool CT26 to it? Skip the DC on it completely?

 

IMG_0573.JPG

 

5. Any ideas on where to place it in my shop? My layout is below with router table between existing BS and cyclone. Maybe under air filter but need 8' infeed on 17" bandsaw on occasion (like now for Roubo). Could move it away from wall a bit.

 

post-8178-0-03911000-1427228279_thumb.pn

 

6. My 17" bandsaw will only be used for straight ripping and resawing and (says it) supports up to 1" blades. I currently use 1/2" 3 TPI in it but would going to 3/4" 3 TPI but better? 

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I have the Carter Stabilizer and it definitely allows you to make very tight curves...I have the Laguna 14-12 and the color even matches my original guides.   I got it so I could emulate the Holy Llama himself :) and make awesome reindeer...

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I have the carter stabilizer, I've been using it for over a year. I used it when making reindeer during the holidays. In the beginning of the vid you can see it in action.

 

 

Don't mind the mess I had stacks of wood everywhere, stuff just strewn about amidst the chaos.

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Thanks guys the Carter Stabilizer sounds like a go. Used WD-40 and green scotchbrite with finish sander and table cleaned up nicely. Belt has some pretty good set in it after sitting in one place for several years. Going to try and get cogged belt tomorrow.

Got #5 figured out and sometimes you just get lucky. Long boards on the 17" will go under the table on the 14".

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CT26 will work better unless you increase the opening, 4" to 2" will kill the air speed/ volume for a dust collector.

That's what I figured and I'll see if I can rig a 4" port on it somehow as I prefer the convenience of using the DC. My 17" has 2 4" ports and the dust collection sucks on it.

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When WE built this shop.... :P I thought we strung 220V receptacles all over. (?) ....."just in case"....and "just in case" is here. 

You'll pull a lot less amps/power/power bill if you run it on 220v instead of 110v.  Having said that, you're probably not running it 8 hours a day so the largest consideration in my mind is setting it where it will cut best for the stock you cut - shorter pieces or longer pieces and dust collection. It does make a mess and airborne exotic dust isn't good, so DC is a must in my mind.

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When WE built this shop.... :P I thought we strung 220V receptacles all over. (?) ....."just in case"....and "just in case" is here. 

You'll pull a lot less amps/power/power bill if you run it on 220v instead of 110v.  Having said that, you're probably not running it 8 hours a day so the largest consideration in my mind is setting it where it will cut best for the stock you cut - shorter pieces or longer pieces and dust collection. It does make a mess and airborne exotic dust isn't good, so DC is a must in my mind.

Of course WE ran outlets all over and the bandsaw has 3 separate ones to choose from! While 220 will cut the amps in half I don't think it will change the power bill. 

 

IMG_0576.JPG

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Whether you use 220 or 110 your power bill will remain the same. You are charged for kilowatt hours used, not in amps. 

 

Watts = Amps x Volts

 

10A x 110V = 1100 watts

5A x 220V = 1100 watts

 

How do you calculate the HP from watts for 220V tools? For example a 220V router drawing 1800W.

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How do you calculate the HP from watts for 220V tools? For example a 220V router drawing 1800W.

 

You don't a router is a universal brush type motor. To calculate the hp of a router you have to ask your magic 8 ball, thats how the manufacturers do it.

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There is no where in that calculation figuring rpm. You can't calculate hp of universal motors like that. In the case of a router peak hp is rated at maximum rpm. As rpm falls as does hp. With induction motors the speed is changed with pulleys the motor rpm is not changed.

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There is no where in that calculation figuring rpm. You can't calculate hp of universal motors like that. In the case of a router peak hp is rated at maximum rpm. As rpm falls as does hp. With induction motors the speed is changed with pulleys the motor rpm is not changed.

 

Correct, for a motor that runs at a constant speed like 3450 RPM that's the formula. variable speed is a different story and again like I said you are partially right. Asking the magic 8ball is the correct way to do it.

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Also, if you think about it as wattage decreases and power decreases, the HP lowers so the formula should still hold true. ie: instead of running at 1800w it's now running at 1000 watts which should make the HP drop to 1.3HP

 

The way it was explained to me was those calculations work fine if your calculating the hp of a light bulb. Motors in general and especially cheap motors you need to look at power factor to calculate HP thus the difference between real power and apparent power. This is really why so many induction motors produced today don't really have stated HP.

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PB is technically correct. Alternating current through an inductive load (a motor) does not behave like direct current through a resistive load, so the simple amps x volts formula does not produce true power. Also, watts / 746 only gives you the heat equivalent of hp, not the true ability of a motor to do work. Torqe and rpm measurements are necessary to truly determine hp.

Having said all that, bigger is still generally better!

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I get it, you guys have a Bromance.  how sweet.  

Yes.....and your point???? We love Mike AND the shop.  It's like my wiener dog loves me but WHEN I SIT DOWN WITH A SNACK....WELL..... 

#2 So all of you seem to be telling me that there is ABSOLUTELY NO POWER SAVINGS to wire with 220v instead of 110v??? Then why do it???

#3 My point holds true....if there IS a savings....this mathematical pissing match still doesn't matter unless Mike will be running the thing 8 hours a day. 

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There is no savings on your power bill by converting to 220V. If you had a convertible 110/220 hot tub then yes the potential to save is big but not for just because you switched to 220v. That said there are reasons to switch to 220 thus why they are convertible. If your lights flicker when you start the saw then you need to switch to 220v. Flickering lights is telling you that your shortening the life of your motor every time you push the start button. The motors in general will always last longer when run on 220. The centrifugal switch and capacitors will live a much longer life on 220v. Hobby shops tend to short cycle their machines this is all the more reason to run 220v. Start up is the hardest part of a motors life so if you can make it easier then there is no reason not to do so.

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Now.....that's sound reasoning.  Thanks PB.  Then tell me, why do metal working shops opt for 440v?

 

For that it becomes a complete different discussion and becomes the merits of 3phase over single phase and the differences between 220v 3ph vs 440v 3ph No need to muddy up the thread that far IMO.

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The biggest reason to use larger voltage is to produce the same POWER with less current. Less current means less energy lost as heat in the conductors, and often smaller conductors can be used. Smaller conductors are less expensive, so there is your savings.

Regarding PB's comment about 3 phase, there are applications that use 3-phase at 230 volts, many at 460, and quite a few that run at 4160 volts and higher. One motor at the plant where I work runs at 4160 volts, producing 8000 hp. Attempting to do that with even 460 volts would require motor leads (and windings) over 5" in diameter.

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The belt on the machine probably sat in the same position for years. I bought a cogged belt and the machine vibrated for a few minutes then smoothed out. Pulleys are aligned and wheels spin freely so hopefully after the belt gets broken in everything will be smooth.

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Also got my Carter Stabilizer and removed all the top and bottom guides. $18 for ground shipping was a little steep but if it performs as advertised I'll get over it :)

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