Is it important to have the capability of using dado blades?


Recommended Posts

I have been looking at small table saws, mainly the Dewalt dw745, because my old craftsman 10" is wearing out and becoming dangerous to use.  This seems to be the one that gets good reviews, however, I see it does not have the capacity to install a dado as my craftsman did.  Doing so few projects, and not really using the dado much, I would tend to use the router if I needed one for rabbets, etc. Would you consider this to be something you could live without.  Do you have any other recommendation of a table saw in this price range.  Price is my biggest concern at this point, next would be space in my makeshift shop.  Anything I am overlooking?

 

Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you buying the DW for price, or for the portability?  If it's price, I'd look to buy a full size cast iron saw with a belt drive induction motor instead...used is a viable option to stay in budget if necessary.  A portable saw gives up a lot of advantages for the sake of the portability if you don't need that benefit.

 

As far as dados go, you can do them with a router, but I generally prefer to have the mass and power of the TS on my side.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a jobsite that I started out with, and almost 5 years ago, I bought a 113 series craftsman contractor saw from craigslist (cast iron top, induction belt drive motor), and paid about $100 for it.  I put another $200 into with a fence and other updates.  It has been a proven machine for me.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Counterpoint: I haven't used my dado stack since I abandoned my old Craftsman jobsite saw in favor of a used Ridgid contractor saw, about 2 years ago.

And haven't missed it yet.

But man, what a difference the saw makes! I'll give up working wood before I go back to a jobsite saw.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been looking at small table saws, mainly the Dewalt dw745, because my old craftsman 10" is wearing out and becoming dangerous to use.  This seems to be the one that gets good reviews, however, I see it does not have the capacity to install a dado as my craftsman did.  Doing so few projects, and not really using the dado much, I would tend to use the router if I needed one for rabbets, etc. Would you consider this to be something you could live without.  Do you have any other recommendation of a table saw in this price range.  Price is my biggest concern at this point, next would be space in my makeshift shop.  Anything I am overlooking?

 

Thanks

I like having options.  If I could meet the TS need and still have the capability to use a dado stack, I'd go for it.  But then, I build things where I use the dado stack fairly regularly.  If you're asking the question, you probably do too.  Now.... are you willing to only use the router for cutting dados or rabbets?  You already know what you want to do...yes?  If you've been happy with the Craftsman and want another, they are ALL over craig's list for $100-$200.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a dado stack, yet, but I do plan on getting one. I've never used a small portable table saw before but I have used an older contractor style saw for awhile before I bought my current saw. Leaps and bounds above the previous one, even though it is only a hybrid. The size and weight of the machine are enough to make this decision pay for itself.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a table saw with the capability of mounting a dado set due to where I live - I don't miss it as I've never had it. To cut dadoes I just use the router table. If I can't get it on the router table I use an clamp guide in the middle of the board and use the router hand held.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a table saw with the capability of mounting a dado set due to where I live - I don't miss it as I've never had it. To cut dadoes I just use the router table. If I can't get it on the router table I use an clamp guide in the middle of the board and use the router hand held.

where do you live that a dado stack is not available?
Link to post
Share on other sites

They are not allowed in commercial shops and haven't been for many years. You can do what you want in home shops but most if not all table saws sold in the EU (Europe) have not got sufficient length on the arbor to fit a dado stack. You can get a new arbor made of course, you can buy dado stacks and use them in your home shop.

My particular table saw can't be fitted with a longer arbor. If you did the dado blade would hit the sliding table. Sliding tables are fitted to many table saws in the EU.

The sliding tables are designed so that they almost touch a regular 1/8" blade. No zero clearnce insert required although I've made them for mine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a good link from Carus that explains it. I'd forgotten about the 10 second ruling. This states that machinery should come to a stop within 10 seconds usually using a brake on the motor. The dado head potentially having a greater mass and therefore much more inertia than an 1/8" blade would be more difficult to stop within that time. My 1/8" blade stops in about 2 or 3 seconds but even if it stops within the 10 second limit or indeed 2 seconds it would still do much damage.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.