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I want to put a large chamfer on a table top -- something on the order of .25" x 3".  I can't put something this big on my table saw and don't have much in the way of planes.  I'm sort of picturing some kind of router jig, but I'm not really crazy about how I'm thinking that will work.  Any other suggestions?

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Marc's video is pretty straight forward.  I should have been a little more clear in what I am attempting.  I want the 3" dimension to be along the face of the table top and the 1/4" dimension to be along the edge.  To do what Marc shows in the video I'd have to set the circ saw at something like 75 degrees which doesn't make any sense.  If I run the saw along the edge (essentially 90 degrees from the setup Marc had) then I can set the saw to 15 degrees.  I'm thinking I'll need a fancy purpose built edge guide/jig so that the saw doesn't have a chance to tip.  Still not convinced this is the best approach but may try it on some scrap pieces to see if I can get it to work in a safe manor and still get the result I'm looking for.  I'm picturing a jig that kind of looks like the Greek letter pi that straddles the edge of the table top.

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A circ saw is not that wide. I don't think you need a saddle. I would ride my circ saw on a bench. You can even use a sheet of ply. By the time you screw a couple of two by to the sheet, your work piece is now blocked up. A shim to get your saw to ride at the right height and your two by and sheet corner gives you something to push the saw against. This requires good common sense as you would run the saw on its side. It also requires working close to the edge of the ply so your saw motor clears. I think this is a lot faster than building a saddle.

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It's definitely something I'd tackle with hand planes.  I know that doesn't help you at the moment but maybe it's a good time to invest in a low angle jack.  I'm sure a jig can be built to do this with a circular saw...just be very careful.

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Belt sander maybe? Secure the piece to your bench and hold the sander at a slight angle to slowly work down the corner. It would actually work a lot like a hand plane would, just mark your board on the face and the edge with where you want to come down to and make multiple passes taking a little bit at a time until you meet both your marks.

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Without hand planes, Stobes21's belt sand suggestion sounds the most reasonable. I don't think the typical circ saw will cut 3" deep, and a straight router bit that long might be hard to find as well. Either would require extra support along the table edge to keep them in line.

Using the belt sander to work close to a layout line, then fine ttuning with a card scraper or sanding block may be the best choice, short of new tool acquisition.

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Router jig sounds pretty simple but it's going to take a while and make a mess.  Table top sitting on the bench, close to the edge.  One angled rail off the table top and one on top of it and the router attached to a long base plate that spans the two rails with enough extra to move across the whole chamfer.  Like flattening a cutting board except at an angle.

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Belt sander maybe? Secure the piece to your bench and hold the sander at a slight angle to slowly work down the corner. It would actually work a lot like a hand plane would, just mark your board on the face and the edge with where you want to come down to and make multiple passes taking a little bit at a time until you meet both your marks.

 

 

A power plane would make quick work of this as well, and possibly give you a flatter surface.

 

A sureform tool would go a long way as well, and are less finicky than a hand plane, and are cheaper, don't tear out as much but leave unique marks that require more attention while sanding. these are available at your choice of box store. I would not buy a hand plane from one of these outlets, they are worthy of a stronger investment.

 

Someone mentioned scrapers as well...If you don't want to buy a card scraper buy a 50 pack of utility knife blades, these will wreak havoc on your fingers so you might want to cushion the edges with electrical tape. 

 

No matter how you decide to go about your chamfer, I would suggest making a large sanding block. Take two 4 1/2" x 22" x 3/4" long pieces of mdf and glue/screw them face to face. This thicker piece of mdf will give you a nice flat surface to adhere sandpaper to. The reason to make it these dimensions all has to do with sandpaper size. cut a sheet in half and glue the two pieces end to end onto the block. use spray adhesive and a low grit sand paper. this should give you ample surface area to finish flattening out and remove tool marks from your chamfer in a very controlled way.

 

hope this helps and good luck. 

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A power plane would make quick work of this as well, and possibly give you a flatter surface.

A power planer is a good suggestion. Just be sure to take a really light pass, as light as your planer can take, until you establish your angle and have a good reference surface to work off of. Those things can take off a lot of wood very, very quickly so be careful.

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I want to put a large chamfer on a table top -- something on the order of .25" x 3".  I can't put something this big on my table saw and don't have much in the way of planes.  I'm sort of picturing some kind of router jig, but I'm not really crazy about how I'm thinking that will work.  Any other suggestions?

 

Is this top already built?

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Lots of interesting suggestions.  I really appreciate the input.  The top is actually for a side boards piece of furniture so the top is approximately 20" x 60" (yes, it's like a large raised panel).  The long edge I can do on the table saw once I make a tall fence (that's pretty easy).  The short edges I'll have to use some other method like discussed above since I can't stand a 60" piece up on the table saw.  I may take the plunge and get a plane as this really seems like the right way to go.  My second choice is leaning towards building the router jig (like for flattening a large piece of wood) at an angle.  I do like the suggestion too of making a large sanding block.  

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Lots of interesting suggestions.  I really appreciate the input.  The top is actually for a side boards piece of furniture so the top is approximately 20" x 60" (yes, it's like a large raised panel).  The long edge I can do on the table saw once I make a tall fence (that's pretty easy).  The short edges I'll have to use some other method like discussed above since I can't stand a 60" piece up on the table saw.  I may take the plunge and get a plane as this really seems like the right way to go.  My second choice is leaning towards building the router jig (like for flattening a large piece of wood) at an angle.  I do like the suggestion too of making a large sanding block.  

 

Is this a floating panel. If so 60" is to long and needs a center rail.

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It's not a floating panel.  The top is like a raised panel without the surrounding rails and styles.  Somebody mentioned a shaper, but 1) don't have a shaper, and 2) I'm not confident I could find the exact profile I'm looking for.  I do have a 3HP router and router table.  The more I think about it I'm leaning towards a plane and a bit of practice.

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You won't get it with a shaper unless you had custom knives made for a vertical cut not gunna happen with a horizontal cut without a custom 8" head either. May me easier to drag the tables saw outside with a tall fence. Personally I'd just us the jointer.

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