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BACK IN THE DAY........Tim with a wife 4 young kids had himself a finnnnne conversion van. Mistake #1. 

Mistake #2 - Heater core leaking and as you may know, it's under the dash on the passenger side so the carpet KEPT getting damp.  [yeah, I needed to fix the heater core...but I just kept adding water]  Windshield fogged with sweet smelling anti-freeze.  Wife upset....Tim won't take time and properly fix. 

Mistake#3....Radiator runs dry, Tim forgot to add water. Engine burns up. *^%^&#%$*^,,,,Limited money....Instead of roll back, Dad and I pull it a long way to the garage with a chain. Something about the fluid not circulating in the transmission when the engine is not running.....transmission toasted so NOW.....I needed an engine, a transmission, AND still needed.......a heater core. 

      If you go to to Google and type in "image moron", my picture may be one in the list.  My conversion van is your scratch.

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I've got a new one as of today. While using the steel screw to tap some pre drilled holes for a beautiful set of brusso hinges, I snapped the steel screw off in the hole because I drilled a pilot hole too small.

Insert face in palm..

 

Think positive: now you have the opportunity to learn how to fix that particular screwup. Next time you'll know and it'll just be another step in the process if needed. The moral of your story is to not use a power driver to set hinge screws(or you've now learned how hard you can lean on a hand-powered screwdriver before you overtorque said screw).

 

Live and learn, if you don't learn something every day you're either dead or don't do anything. ;)

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Think positive: now you have the opportunity to learn how to fix that particular screwup. Next time you'll know and it'll just be another step in the process if needed. The moral of your story is to not use a power driver to set hinge screws(or you've now learned how hard you can lean on a hand-powered screwdriver before you overtorque said screw).

Live and learn, if you don't learn something every day you're either dead or don't do anything. ;)

Both very true and well said. Time will tell if my fix holds its own. Being that this box shouldn't be opened for a few years, I'm hoping I'm safe

Weirdly it was hand driving. I thought about grabbing it 2 my low torque 7v snap on driver but too the safe route instead. Lesson learned, drill a pilot hole the size of the screw body without threads.

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I've got a new one as of today. While using the steel screw to tap some pre drilled holes for a beautiful set of brusso hinges, I snapped the steel screw off in the hole because I drilled a pilot hole too small.

Insert face in palm..

I did this exact thing TWICE on my last project.

 

I ended up using a chisel to gouge out a depression between the two screws. Then I used a Dremel to expose the broken screws enough to get a needle-nose pliers on them. After the extraction was complete I chiseled out a rectangle shape and fit in a bit of wood.

Drill proper pilot holes, install hinges, and there you have it.

All of the repair is under the hinge, so you would have to remove it to view evidence of the whoops! moment.

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Wow...although I don't know you, I feel bad for you. 

 

Usually I'll have a bone-head moment at least once per project. 

 

Once I was cutting something with my Milwaukee cordless circ saw; the material was locked in my JawHorse.

 

Like yourself, I got so far and thought "why is this so hard to push though". Stopped and saw I added a "speed hole" to my JawHorse. Luckily it was my cordless and not my 15amp corded...damage would have been worse.

 

 

post-15474-0-05274400-1430617207_thumb.p

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There were no sparks...a metal blade (band saw or a cold cut saw (circ saw for metal)) do not create sparks. 

 

If it were an abrasion disc, then sparks aplenty. 

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There were no sparks...a metal blade (band saw or a cold cut saw (circ saw for metal)) do not create sparks.

If it were an abrasion disc, then sparks aplenty.

router bits will create sparks when it hits a screw... First hand experience.

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So will your 10" circular saw with a rip blade. I've run into my saw horse brackets a few times

a 10" circular saw? Man I bet that things a beast!
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a 10" circular saw? Man I bet that things a beast!

Here on the coast, contractors build houses raised on huge timbers - like 12x12s.  To cut them to length, they have these handheld circular saws that run something like a 12" or 14" blade.  They say the rpms are cut back a good bit so you can handle it if it pinches or kicks back.

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I was gluing up my workbench this weekend and it was too long for my assembly table alone so it was partially on my SawStop top. (Yes the scratched SawStop top that started this thread) I proceeded to glue up the workbench with some parchement paper on the SawStop to to protect it. When I took the clamps off and moved the workbench I realized the glue leaked through the parchment paper and stained the top for a good 12-16". I guess parchement paper and wax paper are two different things!!!! I've given up on keeping this top nice. It actually didn't bother me too much considering I had gotten over the scratch in it.

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Shaney, I don't know if i'd laugh or cry at that point.  I have a new SawStop on order & all this is making me paranoid.

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Here on the coast, contractors build houses raised on huge timbers - like 12x12s. To cut them to length, they have these handheld circular saws that run something like a 12" or 14" blade. They say the rpms are cut back a good bit so you can handle it if it pinches or kicks back.

oh I'm not saying they aren't out there, I just don't want to try to manhandle anything bigger than my 7 1/4! It's bad enough when one of those pinch, the big ones must have clutches or something cause it would take some power to spin this big blades and cut heavy timber!

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Heck yeah....I don't want kickback on anything handheld!!! I don't have the guns to hold a saw like that.

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Heck yeah....I don't want kickback on anything handheld!!! I don't have the guns to hold a saw like that.

i bet you'd be surprised how strong you are when that sucker starts to kick!

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