Stanley Bedrock No. 604 Smoothing Plane


Keggers
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I have a Bedrock No. 604 that I got from my uncles estate. I have no use for it and am planning to sell it soon.  I was wondering if this was a sought after model. I haven't found much info when I googled it. It appears to be in very good "dirty" conditon. I didn't notice any rust. I'm sure the blade needs sharpening. The handle is tight and seems to have all the parts. I'm guessing the original owner had "Stolen from and then his name" engraved on the side of the plane. I'm positive my uncle didn't steal it from this person.

 

When I get around to selling it,  I'll post pictures in the forum to give anyone interested a chance to buy it. I'd rather one of you guys get it than just selling it on eBay.

 

If anyone can offer some info I'd sure appreciate it.

 

I'm GUESSING this is a smoothing plane. I'm really not very knowledgeable when it comes to hand planes.

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     If the iron is flat on the side it's more wanted, than the early models that are rounded as most Stanley planes... Restored the flat ones are selling on ebay for about $150 to $200, the rounded edge ones are going from $80 to $120.    I personally don't know if they are better than a normal #4, I've never used one!  I think it may be a gloat thing!

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The Lie Nielsen planes were modeled after the Bedrocks.  The LNs do have some improvements (thicker body, thicker blade and chip break, stress relieved ductile iron), but shape and tuning are pretty much the same.  I've got a Bedrock #8 that's just as usable as my LN #7.  Yours is a smoothing plane.  A 604 is the Bedrock version of a Bailey #4.  Fantastic planes.  You should have no problem getting rid of it no matter what shape it's in.  Obviously, the condition will determine the price.  

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Just a thought Keggers, you could hang on to it..  I'm not sure if you're a hand tool guy but, if you're not, it could be your entry into it. If you are a hand tool guy, at least it has some history in your family.   What ever you decide, I wish you the best of luck.

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Thank you for all the info. It's much appreciated! I think I'll blow the dust off of it and post a few pictures. I should have done that with the original post. I have two or three Veritas planes that I bought a few years ago that have yet to be used. They are still in their boxes - so I doubt that I will ever use this plane.

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I'm still attempting to gather information on this plane. I'm "guessing" that what I have is a Stanley No. 604-C plane since it has a corrugated bottom. The C designation because of the corrugation. Does that sound right to you guys?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Below is a great site for dating the plane, the type (aka date) is the key to the value. The great thing about the flat sided Bedrocks is that you can adjust the mouth opening without removing the iron/chip breaker. The bedrocks also have better frogs with more surface area for the blade to rest. Great tools with a family history are hard to come by so I'd think real hard before selling, especially if you have kids as that was one thing that drew my son in-using his great grandfathers old plane. Just a suggestion.

http://www.antique-used-tools.com/brtypes.htm

God bless,

Nate

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For fun, here is my #604. Possibly the Ultimate #604!

 

It is planing into some of the most interlocked grain - Fiddleback Marri - and leaving a glassy finish.

 

VeritasCustomPlanes4_html_1c26dd2d.jpg

 

The blade is a custom one made from CPM-M4 steel. This will last 3x that of A2 and twice D2 steel. It is very fine-grained and takes a wonderful edge (you do need ceramic and diamonds to hone it, however). Here is the steel chart ...

 

ChiselBladeTesting-5Steels_html_415fd1dc

 

The chipbreaker is from LV, and set around 0.4mm.

 

The handle is one I designed and built (in Jarrah) after much research (seek out my review on the Veritas Custom Planes for details). The angle is more vertical, which add more control and power when pushing.

 

Regards from Perth

 

Derek

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NT, some years ago they were offered on WoodNet by John Paine. 

 

They are hellish hard to hone, unless you hollow grind them to the edge, which is possible since they are impervious to being over-heated. A CBN wheel makes this easy. Honing on ceramic (such as Spyderco) or diamond (plates and paste) does a good job. The edge is excellent, and lasts a long time. Keep in mind that this was an experimental blade (I have others in different steels), and I would not recommend it unless you had the appropriate equipment.

 

Regards from Perth

 

Derek

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