Filling spaces between sheets of plywood flooring


Niku
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I had a contractor replace the particle board in my kitchen floor with plywood. I hired a contractor because I wasn't confident that I could do the job. However, I now want to do the same thing in other parts of my mobile home, but  I'd like to do it myself this time. My only concern is the spaces that will inevitably appear between the sheets/pieces of plywood. What material would be best for this? Plastic wood would probably do a good job, but I want something cheaper. Since my job will probably have more such spaces than a professional's job, I expect to have to do a lot of patching. What's good and not too expensive?

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No reason for gaps. Lay out the first row, and don't nail anything. Stagger the next row, and persuade both to fit perfectly. Once there, fasten down, and the next rows should fit perfectly. The trick is not to fasten down the first piece until it's abutting its neighbor.

When you buy the plywood, select good pieces without beat up edges, and do what you have to getting it to the job without beating up the edges.

We did such a plywood floor for a sail loft once. They didn't even want nails in it other than around the edges.

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Fix All it's like a sheet rock hot mud once mixed apply expediently as it will set up in 5/10 min. they also make a feather patch it has a longer open time you can get that at a flooring store it's used by flooring installers to feather out areas that are going to get vinyl flooring Fix All is at home center HD or Lowes. I agree with tight joints on the original install but the way I'm reading this thread is he's already installed the plywood.  

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I too have a mobile home.  If there is water damage, you want to get the particle board out from under the walls too (that can be a challenge).  Replace the particle board with T&G plywood the same thickness of the original floor, the seams should line up over the joists.  I found this site when I first got my home and it has a wealth of good information.  http://mobilehomerepair.com/index.php

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No reason for gaps. Lay out the first row, and don't nail anything. Stagger the next row, and persuade both to fit perfectly. Once there, fasten down, and the next rows should fit perfectly. The trick is not to fasten down the first piece until it's abutting its neighbor.

When you buy the plywood, select good pieces without beat up edges, and do what you have to getting it to the job without beating up the edges.

We did such a plywood floor for a sail loft once. They didn't even want nails in it other than around the edges.

I don't want gaps, but sometimes I don't get what I want. My qustionn is what to do when gaps appear.

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Unless your gaps are huge, there's no reason to fill.  Like Tom said, just plan it out.  Measure twice and cut once.

Gaps can and will appear (it depends upon the skill of the one installing the sheets of plywood), and large gaps cannot be ignored. Installing linoleum over such gaps is asking for trouble.

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Fix All it's like a sheet rock hot mud once mixed apply expediently as it will set up in 5/10 min. they also make a feather patch it has a longer open time you can get that at a flooring store it's used by flooring installers to feather out areas that are going to get vinyl flooring Fix All is at home center HD or Lowes. I agree with tight joints on the original install but the way I'm reading this thread is he's already installed the plywood.  

No, I'm talking about future plywood installation, and it sounds as if "Fix All" is not the product for large gaps. However, since I may have misunderstood your remarks, I'll ask about it the next time I go to Home Depot.

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If in fact you Do end up with gaps you want filled go to Hd and get some floor leveling compound.

That might be what I'm looking for. Now that you mention it, I remember once using it for floor leveling in the bathroom prior to toilet installation. I remember sanding it until the floor was perfectly level. Thanks, I think it will do the job.

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I too have a mobile home.  If there is water damage, you want to get the particle board out from under the walls too (that can be a challenge).  Replace the particle board with T&G plywood the same thickness of the original floor, the seams should line up over the joists.  I found this site when I first got my home and it has a wealth of good information.  http://mobilehomerepair.com/index.php

Seeing this second mention of T&G, I had to look it up. I now remember planning to use Tongue and Grove panels on a front porch deck. I didn't, and later regretted it. Anyway, although I presume that they would be more expensive, it doesnt seem to me that they would be any more rigid than ordinary plywood. Even so, if there is not a significant price differential, I would prefer using T&G panels. I've bookmarked the blink you supplied.. I may have purchased their book years ago but it could have been someone else. I'll look into it.

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A floor levelling compound is too brittle.  Mobile homes move.  It does not matter if they are on frost line footings and anchored, they move.  It is just the nature of the beast.  So a cement type levelling compound will crack and peel away from the floor.  You should not have cracks that are very big in the new floor, but if you do here are a few things I would keep in mind.

 

If you are putting wall to wall carpet down, a good underlay material will help with a lot of them

Click lock laminates will span small cracks too, again, get a good underlay for it as the house will move as stated and your floor will have gentle dips in it.

If you want a vinyl floor, you may want to put a layer of 1/8" luan as an underlay.

 

Cracks should not be more than 1/8" in the floor.  If you are worried about them you can squeeze in some silicone of latex caulking as a "quick and dirty" remedy.  You are taking a bit of a chance on this one though.  I would cover the whole (new) floor with luan first.

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