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Hi folks,
I'm thinking of building a magazine rack, something broadly similar to the one in this picture:

http://www.thedormyhouse.com/images/shop/magazine_holder.jpg

 

Using solid wood. The grain would run horizontally along the sides, and vertically on the ends.

 

(I think I landed there just for aesthetic reasons, although I also want some strength at the ends where the handle attaches, for supporting the weight when lifting, and I thought that lifting along the grain would be stronger).

 

So my question is:

 

Can I use tenons on the sides going into mortises in the ends (one long mortise? two smaller ones?) in this cross-grain scenario?  If I just leave a little space at each end of the tenon for the sides to expand, will that do it? Is this the best joinery option here, generally?

 

Thanks, cheers.

Bob Daniel

 

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I would use horizontal grain everywhere.  When you lift on the handle, you are pulling up on the center and the weight is downwards at the sides.  I think there's a chance of splitting if the grain is vertical.  Also, the strength difference doesn't matter - it's just a few magazines, not 50 reams of paper.   

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I agree on using horizontal grain on all 5 pieces. Center piece glued into a shallow dado will be more than adequate. Corner joints may be a little weak if just butt joints. Some options could be mitered joints with splines, box joints or dovetails. You could even go with the Greene & Greene look.

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I would use horizontal grain everywhere.  

Thanks (all) for the replies. That was my original idea. The reason I edged away from that (for now at least) was partly aesthetic, as I said (I like the look of grain running along the longer dimension of a board) but also partly because the sides will be fairly tall and I wanted to avoid gluing up a board to get that height.  I can get 12" pine fairly easily but not sure QS oak in 12" width will be that easy to get here (still debating wood choice as well).

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===> I can get 12" pine fairly easily but not sure QS oak in 12" width will be that easy to get here (still debating wood choice as well).

 

Why not do a panel glue up if your selection of wood isn't available in that width?

 

Another joinery option that would look good would be to let the sides overhang the front and back by a half inch and do a few evenly spaced through tennons.

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By the way, I disagree with horizontal everywhere. I think it would look much better with vertical grain on the sides and if you use a stable dry wood to start with, that panel is so small using a few through tenons or a stopped groove shouldn't effect it. 

 

A pictures worth a thousand words. 

post-14683-0-14139700-1437663022_thumb.j

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Another joinery option that would look good would be to let the sides overhang the front and back by a half inch and do a few evenly spaced through tennons.

Yes, that's how I've currently got it sketched. Or rather, I have it as the front and back overhanging the sides, with side tenons going into front and back mortises. But I'll have to see what the vice versa looks like, good idea, thanks!

 

But it sounds like everyone thinks the grain should all wrap around in the same direction. Okay, will give that serious consideration. Thanks all.

(EDIT: okay, almost everyone! :))

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===>Or rather, I have it as the front and back overhanging the sides, with side tenons going into front and back mortises

 

If you do go with alternating grain, that I think is a bad idea.

Not sure I follow why that is... isn't it, either way, a matter of one board expanding in a different direction than the other? Mind you the front and back are narrower, so they'll expand a bit less. Is that what you meant?

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If you do through tenons, or a stopped groove for that matter-  the way you suggested, as the front panel expands your joinery can potentially come apart (Panel expands, stub tenon doesn't). Going the other direction your front can buckle, but you can allow for some give in the latter situation by cutting your panel into a glue up, and shouldering your tenon.  

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I'm with Janello on this one.  I think the ends need to be vertical if not to be painted.  Although I agree that orienting it horizontal would alleviate a lot of expansion issues.

 

Unless the ends were quarter sawn I cant see them splitting out with a thru tenon.  But thru tenons wouldn't leave much ability to expand.  Maybe a doweled connection with the center tight and the edges in slots? 

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If you wanted to use the horizontal grain,  maybe you could make a style and rail frame with a full floating horizontal grain panel. (kinda like a raised panel door) This would give you the look you wanted but eliminate any of the inherent problems others have mentioned. 

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If you wanted to use the horizontal grain,  maybe you could make a style and rail frame with a full floating horizontal grain panel. (kinda like a raised panel door) This would give you the look you wanted but eliminate any of the inherent problems others have mentioned. 

 

I was going to mention this but I didn't think it was the look he was after. Personally, for this application...YUCK.  <_<

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Anyone recall the link for an online wood expansion calculator?

 

My "woodshop" app suggests eastern white pine and white oak (not QS) will both expand 5/32" across a 12" board if it goes from 10% to 50% humidity (like if it fell in the pool :)

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