Teri

Hand saw?

Recommended Posts

I would not buy it.  It is pretty recent, based on the aluminum medallion and the shape of the handle.  I like the Disstons from before 1930ish.  The reason I would not buy this saw is the plate is pretty rusty for newer saw and is probably not great quality steel,  the handle would not be comfortable (and is not sized for a typical 3 fingered grip), also the hang looks really high to me. It is properly priced though. 

 

Almost any saw that buy buy used (CL eBay or other) is going to require a little work...at the very least sharpening, and more than likely a bit of jointing, and cleaning.  If you buy one from Patrick Leach or Joshua Clark you'll know the condition, and may require substantially less setup. The only way to get one that is ready to go is to buy from a new manufacturer (Bad Axe, L-N, LV etc.) or from a old saw restorer...whose names currently escape me, I know Mark Harrell of Bad Axe sometimes has some, and Matt Cianci might, and I forgot the rest.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For your very first handsaw it's not a bad idea to go to local big box store and pick up a hardpoint saw for around $20. They are very sharp and actually work a lot better than you would expect. Use the saw for rough breakdown of stock for your projects. If you like using the handsaw than think about getting a rip and crosscut saw. It's always handy to have a Hardpoint, they are great for breaking down 2x4's or anything that you don't want your nice saws to touch. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great saws for a lower entry price are made by Lee Valley: try their Veritas saws--dovetail, carcass, or tenon. 

 

NO, I don't own or use them; but, I have learned after restoring a bunch of old saws that the LVs are quite a deal once all set up costs are considered for refurbishing!

 

Nor would I hesitate to suggest that you consider a Wenzloff, a Bad Axe, an Adria, or a LN saw. These are excellent quality at mostly a fair price. You do get what you pay for!!!!!! Buy once, buy right!

 

Blessings,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any thoughts regarding a brand based on a hand size?  I looked at the Bad Axe website... and one day I may be ready to spend that kind of money on a saw, but not today.  But I notice they customize based on hand size - and based on their measurements I would need an extra small.  I guess I probably need to just get into a store and handle a couple and see how they feel. I just wondered if there was a brand that maybe ran small...?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one of these and use it quiet often.... to lay my glue brush on to keep it off of my work bench. Don't waste your money

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Lee Valley dovetail and carcass saws.  I think they are great, and at a very good price point.  I have used their larger saws a couple times and they were fine as well.  They are sharp on arrival, but after sharpening my dovetail saw the performance was outstanding, so a quick pass with a file wouldn't hurt. The other nice thing about the Lee Valley saws, is they have made available patterns for the handles.  You could adjust the dimensions to fit your hand, just keep the shaft hole and mating surface consistent:  http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=63262

 

 As far as hand size, I think the trick is to try and get some saw in your hands; LV are at Woodcraft, and many times antique stores have saws that may or may not be great purchases but give you an opportunity to feel the handles.  I have large but low volume hands, and it seems whatever the pre-1920 Disston size is fits me the best.  But the Bad Axe standard size and Lee Valley handles are comfortable enough for a few hours.

 

As far as which saw first, think about what you will be doing with it.  rough stock break down, final dimensioning,  joinery, dovetails, etc.  That should drive your first purchase, from there, any handle that is wood you can adapt or swap to fit your hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have time but no money for a Veritas or Wenzloff or what have you, you could buy that saw (or a hardware store saw) and remove the handle and make one from a template here:

 

http://www.blackburntools.com/articles/saw-handle-templates/index.html

 

Then you can customize it to your hand.  Fancy antique saws used applewood handles.  It is hard to get in large pieces, so when I rehandled my Grandpa's old back saw I used cherry.  His was just a cheapo Craftsman saw but with a nice cherry handle and hand-sharpened and set teeth it is a great saw.  I didn't like the screws that were in the original handle so I bought these:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Great-Neck-Hand-Replacement-Screws/dp/B000G33PA8

 

Not as fancy as the boutique makers' split screws but they look better than machine screws and work well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.