Cliff

My shop overhaul

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3 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I like my pvc ducting. I don't think I'll ever go metal.

I think it will be fine for my harbor freight collector. But once I upgrade to something more powerful (probably 2 years) I'll do something better. Or at least, bigger diameter. 

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7 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I like my pvc ducting. I don't think I'll ever go metal.

I check into using PVC, but almost all my ducts are 6", 7" or 8" & around here, it's a harder to get PVC & fittings above 4" that don't cost a fortune.

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7 hours ago, drzaius said:

I check into using PVC, but almost all my ducts are 6", 7" or 8" & around here, it's a harder to get PVC & fittings above 4" that don't cost a fortune.

Really?  PVC 6" wye on the internet $22, Norfab 6" wye $140.  Even a decent spiral 6" wye around here is $70.   I do see what you mean when you go above 6" in PVC.  What a price jump; almost double!  Glad I bought lots of spares before the price on PVC jumped some years back.  I got 10' sticks for about $9.  I see they are $17 now.  I haven't had to buy anything since and still have some 10' sticks, 45's and wyes in the rafters :)  What are people using that is less expensive than PVC?

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Some 26 Ga hvac ducting is strong enough for under 3 hp collectors and isn't expensive. When i was talking to someone else about pvc ducting i figured out that the prices are very regionally based and probably because of code and geology. If you live in rocky soil odds are there isn't going to be any demand for larger pvc because people won't dig it in them selves also based off the codes that require sizes or don't allow you to do it your self. I can buy up to 6" sdr35 off the shelf and could order 8" if i wanted to. For my shop i didn't need anything larger than 6" beings that I'd only ever have 1 gate open at a time. Size the ducts to the air that will flow through the duct not  the max the collector will flow.

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2 hours ago, gee-dub said:

Really?  PVC 6" wye on the internet $22, Norfab 6" wye $140.  Even a decent spiral 6" wye around here is $70.   I do see what you mean when you go above 6" in PVC.  What a price jump; almost double!  Glad I bought lots of spares before the price on PVC jumped some years back.  I got 10' sticks for about $9.  I see they are $17 now.  I haven't had to buy anything since and still have some 10' sticks, 45's and wyes in the rafters :)  What are people using that is less expensive than PVC?

Keep in mind that some of us are north of the border - I think @drzaius is in Alberta. Many options that are inexpensive in the US are not the same in Canada. By the time you try to ship something here and possibly pay customs fees on it, you're better off finding an alternative.

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14 hours ago, Cliff said:

Like the power box thing clearly requires a left handed person.

I didn't have a problem with this... Oh thats right I am a lefty.

We need more wide angle pictures so we can make sure you are setting your shop up correctly. :P

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20 hours ago, K Cooper said:

Looking good Cliff but please straighten that black level:D

If it was still in my shop I'd make sure it was crooked and send you a pic everyday. But it's not. It was just left behind by my stepfather from the floor build :)

 

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Dang dude, you been busy! Food for thought. I built my cover using 1 1x4’s as the frame,  uprights and cross pieces across the top, just big enough to enclose the slabs. Then bought black landscape fabric to cover the sides. This provides air circulation but provides rain protection for the sides. Then I laid corrugated metal panels over the top, anchored with building blocks or anything handy. I still have some under this after 4 years and have had to replace the fabric only once. All of the slabs are up off the concrete on building blocks and stickered. 

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3 minutes ago, K Cooper said:

Dang dude, you been busy! Food for thought. I built my cover using 1 1x4’s as the frame,  uprights and cross pieces across the top, just big enough to enclose the slabs. Then bought black landscape fabric to cover the sides. This provides air circulation but provides rain protection for the sides. Then I laid corrugated metal panels over the top, anchored with building blocks or anything handy. I still have some under this after 4 years and have had to replace the fabric only once. All of the slabs are up off the concrete on building blocks and stickered. 

I hadn't thought of the landscaping fabric, I'll have to look into that. We've got leftover 20 foot tin roofing material from the machine shed build 10 years ago so that will be my top. I do have to make it bigger than the stack though, I have another 6' x 55" crotch piece that I need to get chainsaw milled that will need to fit in here. 

 

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At first I attached the fabric with a staple gun. I’m so gullible and lazy. Gentle breezes soon made me look like a fool. Now I use roofing nails with the plastic washers and it works great. 

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@Cliff I'm new to this forum but not too other WW forums and I literally feel your pain with other posters. Everyone wants to be "the guy" that discovers the fatal flaw in your (or any other)  project. It's human nature I guess. I don't spend as much time in forums as a used to for that exact reason. You could post about using a 6" clamp to pull 2 pieces together for a glue up and before you know it you've got 30 clamping "engineers" telling you how they would've done it. Meanwhile your glue up dried 3 days ago and looks perfect, so you must have done something right, right? 

Everyone means well and I get that but it can get very frustrating. Everyone is an expert on everything. (Full disclosure, I'm just as guilty of doing this as anyone else). When I was putting my shop together I ran a few new circuits. I put in about 8 4-plex outlet boxes most about 4' up from the floor. I don't have any idea if it meets code or not. I banged it out in a day and did clean work. They've worked flawlessly for almost 10 years now. At the time I thought it was too many outlets. Now I wish I would've doubled it!

Anyway, looks like you took the time and money to do things right and you are going to have one sweet, comfortable shop when all is said and done. Kudos to you and your friend for a job well done!

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35 minutes ago, applejackson said:

Everyone wants to be "the guy" that discovers the fatal flaw in your (or any other)  project. It's human nature I guess. I don't spend as much time in forums as a used to for that exact reason.

I make liberal use of the "block" feature on forums for these happy (read sarcasm) campers. This has allowed me to return to forums I had previously written off.  There are some folks I just really don't need to hear from. ;) 

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@gee-dub I might have comes off a little crabbier than I meant to. Most people just want to help, but some use the ruse of wanting to help to show off that they know more than others do. Comes with the territory, I guess. Take care!

Edited by applejackson
Typo

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I try to offer my approach as one way to do something. Even if I'm not explicitly clear at the time there is always more than one way to do things. The thing I find the most frustrating are people that are stubbornly looking for a validation of some shortcut they have either heard of or dreamed up. Even when multiple seasoned craftsmen try to explain methods & proven techniques they want to argue about it. I think  we all may be guilty of this at times. 

So even if it's not clear at times please consider any approach or opinion I offer as merely one way I know has worked for me. I've learned a lot the hard way by making time consuming & expensive mistakes and I'm trying to help others from repeating them.  I hope my intentions haven't come across as an irritating know it all. 

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11 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

Even when multiple seasoned craftsmen try to explain methods & proven techniques they want to argue about it. I think  we all may be guilty of this at times. 

Guilty.

Some times people need to make their own mistakes to learn why. I'm one of those people. It's very rare but some times i have found techniques that improve on common convention (not necessarily woodworking).

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1 hour ago, wdwerker said:

The thing I find the most frustrating are people that are stubbornly looking for a validation of some shortcut they have either heard of or dreamed up. Even when multiple seasoned craftsmen try to explain methods & proven techniques they want to argue about it.

Never a truer statment. ;)

 

57 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Some times people need to make their own mistakes to learn why.

This is also true.  Some times it sticks in your brain better if some one says thats not the best way and you still try and fail and you walk away saying, yea it didn't work for me either.

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3 hours ago, applejackson said:

@gee-dub I might have comes off a little crabbier than I meant to. Missy people just want to help, but some use the ruse of wanting to help to show off that they know more than others do. Comes with the territory, I guess. Take care!

No worries, I have a gift for being wrong about half the time despite my best intentions :)

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7 hours ago, Chet said:

I am wrong about half the time and I am not sure I know what I am talking about the other half.

x2 just ask my wife ;)

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This has been an interesting (and very good) thread and just like it is at my house when I take on a home improvement project, if the owner is happy with it then it's all good.

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