Molding


trz
 Share

Recommended Posts

Looking for a good book on cutting/installing molding.

    I'm doimg some molding (mostly baseboard) in an old farm house where most corners that should be 90s aren't necessarily 90, if you know what I mean! So my 45s are going to be a little more or a little less than.

 

I'm looking for a good book that might help me figure out how to cut those less than perfect miter joints I'll be dealing with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Finish Carpentry " by Gary Katz is a great one. Not really sure you need a book for what you are describing though. Get yourself an angle finder or a little trial and error works as well.

http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Tools/Pages/BoschProductDetail.aspx?pid=DAF220K

Edited by shaneymack
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Finish Carpentry " by Gary Katz is a great one. Not really sure you need a book for what you are describing though. Get yourself an angle finder or a little trial and error works as well.

http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Tools/Pages/BoschProductDetail.aspx?pid=DAF220K

wanted a book simply because I want to learn more about molding and trim work.  You're right I could get by on this one job without but, i would like to learn as much as I can !

     I'll check that book out, thanks.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't need a book.  I learned how to do this stuff from tool catalogs by seeing what tools there are to help. 

 You need a sliding bevel, and an angle divider.  The old Stanley angle dividers are expensive if you can find them though. https://www.google.com/search?q=stanley+angle+divider&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=979&tbm=isch&imgil=JMaKrd9iWxArGM%253A%253BUfCMe5KyFL9ahM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.antiqbuyer.com%25252FAll_Archives%25252FSTANLEY%25252Farchive-miscStanleytools.htm&source=iu&pf=m&fir=JMaKrd9iWxArGM%253A%252CUfCMe5KyFL9ahM%252C_&usg=__8QfVn-lPdhFT1LfMxeCp5PQ-heo%3D&ved=0CFEQyjdqFQoTCIOwlofZ6McCFQKPDQoddt4Ggg&ei=P33vVcOULIKeNva8m5AI#imgrc=JMaKrd9iWxArGM%3A&usg=__8QfVn-lPdhFT1LfMxeCp5PQ-heo%3D

Another alternative is a cheap digital angle gauge bought cheap on ebay.

 or the igaging bevel gauge (with center finding scale on other side) http://www.ebay.com/itm/iGaging-12-Center-Finding-Rule-Bevel-Angle-Gauge-Carpenter-Woodworking-/370835719149?hash=item56578803ed

I use all these methods with preference in that order.

Mark outside corners with a preacher (you have to make that) and cut with sharp handsaw using one of the above methods to mark the top starting cut line.

For coping tight curves on unusual molding for inside corners, a jewelers saw is worth having, as is the coping saw for more sweeping curves.

Sometimes you need a simple pencil compass too. http://www.amazon.com/General-Tools-843-Compass-Scriber/dp/B00004T7R8

 

Edited by Tom King
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't need a book.  I learned how to do this stuff from tool catalogs by seeing what tools there are to help. 

 You need a sliding bevel, and an angle divider.  The old Stanley angle dividers are expensive if you can find them though. https://www.google.com/search?q=stanley+angle+divider&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=979&tbm=isch&imgil=JMaKrd9iWxArGM%253A%253BUfCMe5KyFL9ahM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.antiqbuyer.com%25252FAll_Archives%25252FSTANLEY%25252Farchive-miscStanleytools.htm&source=iu&pf=m&fir=JMaKrd9iWxArGM%253A%252CUfCMe5KyFL9ahM%252C_&usg=__8QfVn-lPdhFT1LfMxeCp5PQ-heo%3D&ved=0CFEQyjdqFQoTCIOwlofZ6McCFQKPDQoddt4Ggg&ei=P33vVcOULIKeNva8m5AI#imgrc=JMaKrd9iWxArGM%3A&usg=__8QfVn-lPdhFT1LfMxeCp5PQ-heo%3D

Another alternative is a cheap digital angle gauge bought cheap on ebay.

 or the igaging bevel gauge (with center finding scale on other side) http://www.ebay.com/itm/iGaging-12-Center-Finding-Rule-Bevel-Angle-Gauge-Carpenter-Woodworking-/370835719149?hash=item56578803ed

I use all these methods with preference in that order.

Mark outside corners with a preacher (you have to make that) and cut with sharp handsaw using one of the above methods to mark the top starting cut line.

For coping tight curves on unusual molding for inside corners, a jewelers saw is worth having, as is the coping saw for more sweeping curves.

Sometimes you need a simple pencil compass too. http://www.amazon.com/General-Tools-843-Compass-Scriber/dp/B00004T7R8

 

there's a couple tools I'm not familiar with.....yet!

The 'correct' way to install baseboard in corners is to install one piece flush and cop the other piece to the profile - miter joints will never look perfect and tend to show gaps more readily due to seasonal wood movement.

that makes sense. And I should have remembered that from the home building course I took 40 yrs. ago.

    What about outside corners?

boy, I really need a refresher course!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're gonna spend money I'd just get the back issues of Fine Homebuilding on DVD.  Numerous authors (pros) provide multiple perspectives on thousands of different projects.

Check Amazon.com from time to time and you can usually get one used for under $60.00.   It's an awesome resource.  When you're done with it you can sell it back on Amazon.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're gonna spend money I'd just get the back issues of Fine Homebuilding on DVD.  Numerous authors (pros) provide multiple perspectives on thousands of different projects.

Check Amazon.com from time to time and you can usually get one used for under $60.00.   It's an awesome resource.  When you're done with it you can sell it back on Amazon.com

Agreed.  You can also get an online membership for $40, which has all the old content in pdf form.  They have a ton of articles on finish carpentry, everything from design ideas to techniques.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

there's a couple tools I'm not familiar with.....yet!

that makes sense. And I should have remembered that from the home building course I took 40 yrs. ago.

    What about outside corners?

boy, I really need a refresher course!

Outside corners get fastened in a way that encourages seasonal movement at the coped end. Outside to outside is the riskiest. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share