These Boots are Made for Woodworking


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I take a tip from my surgeon wife. She is on her feet all day and her and most other medical professionals that are, wear these all day long:

http://www.dansko.com/

I have the clogs right now.

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But my next pair will probably be these:

http://www.dansko.com/Mens/Footwear/Collections/Walden/Wade/Brown%20Oily%20Nubuck/

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Dansko's aren't inexpensive, or cheap, but protect your feet well with good strong leather and provide proper posture and arch support. You can usually find them for around $75 - $120

http://www.zappos.com/search/brand/440/filter/gender/%22Mens%22/productTypeFacet/%22Shoes%22/sort/price/asc

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I figured I'd weigh in on this one because it took me about 15 years to figure it out. Shoes and boots are only one part of a system to prevent achy feet Most people probably don't need the extremes

I wear a pair of Bates "quarter boots" that I purchased from www.galls.com. Their service is great and their pricing isn't bad either. The boots I bought there were the same or less than the crappy on

I'm looking for recommendations on a comfortable work boot for concrete. My basement shop is wonderful in every way except for the concrete floor. What brand do you recommend? Thanks, Pete

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I wear something similar to those Nik. Made by Redback Boots out of Australia. I buy them direct from a guy down under for about $100.

Very well made, tough and comfortable. But I would still wear my crocs in the woodshop. But if your looking for more protection, this is a great boot!

The only issue to overcome is the UK sizing but they give US equivalent. I wear a 11US shoe and a 10UK Redback shoe

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  • 3 weeks later...

My Timberland boots are starting to get cracks in the uppers, so I went to Sears to get a new pair. The first boots I saw looked like Timberlands, but were labelled "Craftsman". The next aisle had "Harley Davidson". The aisle after that had "Dewalt". I finally found some Timberland boots that were labelled "Timberland".

I smiled at the thought of buying a pair of "Dewalt" boots, but bought the Timberlands.

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My most comfortable work boots over the years have been "CAT" as in Caterpillar.

http://www.catfootwear.com/

+1 I've have had my CAT steel toed boots for 5-6 years now and they are unbelievably comfortable when working. I tried getting a few other brands but haven't found anything as comfortable over the long run. In fact I have two other pairs of boots that I haven't worn in at least a year because they just aren't as comfortable. My wife keeps wanting to throw them out because the steel tips are showing through in the front and they have paint and stuff on them but I won't let her :)

Got to pickup another set soon though.

-Jim

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I find Danner to be the most comfortable workboot. But I have to admit I mostly wear cross-trainers in the shop.

I've heard that Crocs work great... Although I could never bring myself to buy them. I'm still feeling the sting of the parachute pant fad.

On a side note; Anyone want to buy a pair of parachute pants? - Only worn for about 4 weeks back in 1987.

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  • 3 weeks later...

For those who want the safety of a composite toe but the comfort of tennis shoes look at station boots, specifically slip ons. I wear a pair of 6" ones at work, and they are closer to the tennis shoe side of the comfort scale. Easy on, good toe protection and good arch support.

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It's funny, over the weekend we went out shopping and I finally gave in to my wife and bought a really nice new pair of Timberland steel tip work boots.

As we were leaving the store, my wife said, "...and don't wear them in the shop, they'll get all dirty" that's when I made the mistake of saying what I was thinking without running it through the buffer, "they are work boots, are you nuts, what do you think I bought them for?" Needless to say, the rest of the conversation went downhill from there. :rolleyes:

So now I have a nice, new pair of Timberland's and I'm still wearing the old comfortable Caterpillars in the workshop. Sometimes I don't know why I bother... :lol: :lol: :lol:

-Jim

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Jim, my wife said the same to me when I bought my last Timberlands. I bought them to do things in, not to look pretty. :-)

Anyway, I wear TImberland Pros most of the time. Other times it's a pair of Adidas MegaBounce or PowerBounce and on occasions my Keens. I also have about 20 of the 3/4" horse stall mats from Tractor Supply. They weigh a ton and are a pain to move. Expensive mats, but are fantastic on the feet and I used them for our gym in the house too. They go on sale every now and again.

chris

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  • 4 weeks later...

Can't believe no mention these?

Croc's! Yep.. by far the best thing I did for my feet in my woodshop/concrete floors.

I spend hours on end some days (10-12)in my shop and for the longest time, nothing helped.

Tried boots, sneakers, low cut hiking shoes, etc.

What I found best were Mens Crocs with a wool sock. It's like a slice of heaven!

The model is full covered top and sides so no sawdust get's it.

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The model I got was "Specialist", $29 and sometimes on sale with a coupon code.

In the summer, I drop the wool socks and just plain ankle socks..

No, it's not steel toe and truthfully I don't see the need for a steel toe shoe in a woodshop.

I wear steel toe in my other job and find most not comfortable at all. Especially ones made for Police/Fire/EMS (I'm a FF)

I have had the big brands too. Very well made but tough to be in all day.

No, I wouldn't wear these doing construction, remodeling or metal work. But in a furniture woodshop, hell yes!

I have dropped a few 10' x 1" x wide Maple boards near my feet and didn't feel a thing. It would have the same thickness as a hiking shoe at the top/toe area.

Try the croc's. Then you'll see why hospital/restaurant workers wear them all day.

-Peter

I agree with you 110%. I have been complaning and looking for the right shop shoe for about five years. A the same time making fun of my wife (a nurse) for wearing these goofy looking shoes called crocs. she has every color made. About 6 months ago I had enough and during my hissy fit about being sick of my feet hurting she says "i dont know you dont just try crocs". and to prove her wrong i went directly to their on line site and ordered a pair called biestro. Made for the food industry and has no holes in the toe area. I got the shoes about a week later and talk about a big piece of crow i had to eat these things are a dream come true. I have all my fatigue mats stacked up in the back of my shop ready to go on craigs list. So now The only complaint i have is I have to here my wife say I told you so, but who cares no more foot problems!

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The only problem with Crocs is if you wear them in public, everyone asks you which hospital you work at. :P

I've got a pair, and they are quite comfortable, but do not offer the same protection as boots, which is what the original poster was asking about.

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  • 1 month later...

My most comfortable work boots over the years have been "CAT" as in Caterpillar.

http://www.catfootwear.com/

Everyday shoes are high end New Balance running/cross trainers. They consistently have a wider "toe box" and great cushioning.

Bottomline everyone has differences and should be fitted properly and buy regardless of brand.

p.s. No mention of "Crocs"? ;)

Thats funny you say that, because I actually DO wear crocs while in the shop.

Only downside is wood shaving get in them on your socks and make your feet itch, but they are like having anti-fatigue mats on your feet.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I take a tip from my surgeon wife. She is on her feet all day and her and most other medical professionals that are, wear these all day long:

http://www.dansko.com/

I have the clogs right now.

standard_206020202.jpg

But my next pair will probably be these:

http://www.dansko.com/Mens/Footwear/Collections/Walden/Wade/Brown%20Oily%20Nubuck/

standard_87057878.jpg

Dansko's aren't inexpensive, or cheap, but protect your feet well with good strong leather and provide proper posture and arch support. You can usually find them for around $75 - $120

http://www.zappos.com/search/brand/440/filter/gender/%22Mens%22/productTypeFacet/%22Shoes%22/sort/price/asc

I have to second you on the clogs. I worked as a cook for a while and feel in love with clog. I love my dansko's and they are easy to slip on and off.

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I've had three pairs of Cats, and I was underwhelmed with their longetivity. I've been sporting a pair of Redwings for six years now. As much as I love them when they finally wear out I'm picking up some Blundstones. It's tough to deal with bootlaces when you're at a clients house with a big piece of furniture, and I want a slip-off boot. I'll stick with the steel toes, it gives me a non-marring place to rest tabletops while waiting for someone to open the door.

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I would say Redwings are the best. I wear them everyday.

Whether I'm going to work, to the bar, or the grocery store, they are my constant companions.

And my feet, knees and back feel great.

Redwings have five or six different soles they'll use on their boots, and you can check the spex for each of them on their website. I think the ones I have are called "vibram". It looks like they took a black boot sole and dipped it in semi-clear gum rubber. Absolutely awesome on concrete.

Redwings Shoe Co. recently split some of their manufacturing overseas. And there is a noticeable drop in quality as you go down their pricelist. Stay away from anything in the "WORX" label. I only buy boots "Made in USA" and pay close to $300 for them, but the quality is excellent.

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  • 1 month later...

For years the only shoes I have found comfortable have been skater's shoes. They are made for comfort, flexibility and traction on concrete and asphalt surfaces, and for being constantly rubbed against sandpaper (skateboard griptape). I give them lots of abuse! I have wide feet too, so I have to be picky about what I stick them in :)

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I hear those fatigue mats are pretty good. I bought some steel toe survivors from wally world. They are fine unless I'm standing in one spot to long like when I use my scroll saw. Gonna probably get some gel inserts. Hope this helps :D

honestly the best thing that i have done was get the mats and a deck chair....the type they use on deep sea boats and mount it to a set of rollers. then i can just push it around for when i have to do some hand sanding, glueing up, when ever im not doing some major cuting.

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