Al Capwn

Nickelback..err Nicholbo!

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58 minutes ago, SawDustB said:

 I'm using Lee valleys 3/4 bushing and 3/4 Brad bit set to do it. It's not the cheapest method

I used this exact set up when I built my Nicholson bench a couple of years ago, it work great.  I drilled a hole with a Forshner bit in a scrap that was a little thicker the the bushing.  Mounted the bushing in the scrap and clamped the scrap in place to my top to hold it while I drilled the dog hole.  Nice straight was the result.

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Ok, 10-4 on the LV bushing. I already have some forstner bits. I even think I have a 3/4" brad already, but not sure if the LV brad bit is married to the bushing. The logical part of me says that 3/4" is 3/4" and to save my pennies. The other part of me says, "Do you really want to make two orders if you are wrong". I mean, good excuse for collecting more tools I suppose. . .

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3 hours ago, Al Capwn said:

not sure if the LV brad bit is married to the bushing

I don't know for sure but I think it probably is.  Wouldn't hurt to call and inquire.

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So the Lee Valley bushing and bit is on the way, as well as a couple other LV goodies - you know, to save on shipping costs...

This past weekend was spent on somewhat unrelated shop projects, namely constructing an upgraded crosscut sled and working on building a new router table. The Jessem benchtop router table I have isn't big enough to house the Triton (one of the horizontal cross members of the frame catches the adjustment knobs, preventing it from being lowered properly) so I am making a new cabinet for it, and salvaging the Jessem router table top.

It also marks an important milestone - my first serious attempt at M&T joinery. *gasp* I know, a woodworker who hasn't done M&T?! Well, decided to remedy my Kreg Jig addiction and apply some real woodworking practice to use. I'm constructing the sides of my router table cabinet using frame and panel construction, so I decided I would M&T the rails/stiles. I used the router plane to route a 1/4" groove for the plywood panel, and used the Veritas bar gauge to measure the internal size the panel needed to be. Worked brilliantly.

Cutting the tenons isn't so bad, but the mortises...not a big fan of doing it by hand or using the drill press/chisel method. This is one of those situations where a router table would be my preferred method, but I have to make the router table...I am noticing a lot of Catch 22s in woodworking.

Alas, I digress: workbench! While I am waiting for the bit & bushing to come in, I think I will focus on adding a shelf to the bottom to act as plane/tool storage - unless there is some practical/conventional wisdom in not doing so.

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If I'm not using the Domino, a plunge router and fence is my preferred method to create mortises.  A router table works too, but dropping a workpiece onto a spiral bit is just not my favorite thing to do.  Plus you can't see what's going on so you have to set up stops.  With a plunge router and fence, you just mark your lines, set your fence and bit depth...boom boom boom, you're done.  No table necessary.  If you're mortising thinner boards like 4/4, you can clamp another board to it to widen the surface your router is riding on so you limit the risk of wobble.  I'm not sure I've ever encountered a situation that required a router table to cut a mortise.  I have done it in the past, but mostly on small parts that make a handheld router dicey.  That's kind of rare though.

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3 minutes ago, Eric. said:

If you're mortising thinner boards like 4/4, you can clamp another board to it to widen the surface your router is riding on so you limit the risk of wobble.

Yeah, boards are a little wider, I am using the rest of my "not real wood" (SYP) before moving on to using primarily hardwoods from now on. I do now have a "new" plunge router, so I suppose I could use that, eh? My main concern was with the base being wider than the material, so it being a bit tippy. Clamping some "support blocks" to the sides to widen it sounds like the right idea. Guessing I need to find/puchase the edge guide, or is there a clever hack to get by?

Also, not sure how to accomplish "stopped chamfers" very will with the hand plane, ala panel doors. On the short stiles, it was easy enough to go all the way through, but performing a mid chamfer wasn't going as well as I'd planned.

Side note, you get credit for doing this the "hard way"; little voice in my head saying that I'll never improve if I never try. Get busy livin, or get busy dyin...

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9 minutes ago, Al Capwn said:

Guessing I need to find/puchase the edge guide, or is there a clever hack to get by?

Eh, not really.  I'd just get the fence.  They don't cost that much and you'll use it a lot.  A totally worthy investment that's almost impossible to regret...unless you're planning on upgrading your router soon.

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Just now, Eric. said:

Eh, not really.  I'd just get the fence.  They don't cost that much and you'll use it a lot.  A totally worthy investment that's almost impossible to regret...unless you're planning on upgrading your router soon.

Fair enough - is there an aftermarket one that soars high above the standard ones, or are they all more-or-less the same?

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As far as I know they're all proprietary and only fit the model (or series of models) of that particular brand.

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31 minutes ago, Eric. said:

As far as I know they're all proprietary and only fit the model (or series of models) of that particular brand.

So bad news is that the Ridgid 2900 / 2901 edge guide is discontinued...

Good news is that the Porter Cable micro-adjustable edge guide for the 690 fits in. Thanks to Amazon, should be here tomorrow.

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So bad news is that the Ridgid 2900 / 2901 edge guide is discontinued...

Good news is that the Porter Cable micro-adjustable edge guide for the 690 fits in. Thanks to Amazon, should be here tomorrow.

That's the one I have. It works reasonably well, although I found it worked a little better with an auxiliary melamine fence to bridge the gap between the halves. No major complaints.

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