Spending my $, New shop start Up


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Hi Gents and Ladies

I have been lucky enough for the last couple of years to have had access to a pretty well equipped university woodshop....well that time has passed so I am now setting up my own.  I have squirreled away 4500$ to get it going and just wanted to list my first purchases and see if anyone has a different based maybe on something I had not thought about.  (and after searching threads I just requested Setting Up :  by Sandor Nagyszalanczy)

The majority of thing I will use the shop for is building cabinets, built-ins, (old) home restoration projects of all kinds.  windows, trim work, flooring, small construction projects etc.  It will be in my basement and mostly in a smallish contained room, with an assembly table in the main part (just trying to keep dust away from the laundry room).  [I have already, Mitre Saw, Plunge router, Sander, Kreg Jig, chisels, block plane )  And will plan to build an assembly/outfeed table.  

1. Table saw (SS Contractor 36") 2000$

2. Planer (Dewalt DW735x) 600$

3. Jointer (Grizzly 6") 600$

4. Festool Domino 950$

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and once i save up some more $, I woulld go bandsaw, drill press, better dust collection

Thanks!!!!  

 

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Welcome!  There are lots of threads on the forum discussing what to buy for each of those items...

To get you a head start, most people are going to comment that you should "go all in" and get a cabinet saw or at least a hybrid, most everyone will agree about the 735x, and mentioning the domino before getting a router/bandsaw/DC/etc will probably turn this into another argument. :)

Happy hunting!

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30 minutes ago, Curtis Mann said:

Hi Gents and Ladies

I have been lucky enough for the last couple of years to have had access to a pretty well equipped university woodshop....well that time has passed so I am now setting up my own.  I have squirreled away 4500$ to get it going and just wanted to list my first purchases and see if anyone has a different based maybe on something I had not thought about.  (and after searching threads I just requested Setting Up :  by Sandor Nagyszalanczy)

The majority of thing I will use the shop for is building cabinets, built-ins, (old) home restoration projects of all kinds.  windows, trim work, flooring, small construction projects etc.  It will be in my basement and mostly in a smallish contained room, with an assembly table in the main part (just trying to keep dust away from the laundry room).  [I have already, Mitre Saw, Plunge router, Sander, Kreg Jig, chisels, block plane )  And will plan to build an assembly/outfeed table.  

1. Table saw (SS Contractor 36") 2000$

2. Planer (Dewalt DW735x) 600$

3. Jointer (Grizzly 6") 600$

4. Festool Domino 950$

--------------------- 

and once i save up some more $, I woulld go bandsaw, drill press, better dust collection

Thanks!!!!  

 

I think your list looks like a good start. Other things to keep in mind that cost a fair bit of money and that you will need are

1) Saw blade for the table saw (not sure what kind of blade comes with Saw Stop, but generally speaking the stock blade is pretty so-so)

2) A starter set of clamps is anywhere from $200 (think pipe clamps and inexpensive smaller clamps) to $500 (Bessey clamps)

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Yep, Domino comes later.  Do traditional M&T for a few years and then you have permission to get lazy.

The Big Five:

Table saw

Jointer

Planer

Bandsaw

Router table

These are your first purchases and if you buy anything else before you own these, you're working backwards.  You also "need" a DC but I don't really consider that a tool so it doesn't make the list.  Whatever you do after The Big Five is up to you and will depend upon the projects you have planned, but The Big Five is not up for debate...because I said so.  Buy the best and biggest you can afford.  That's what I did and I'm now in the process of upgrading all of them.

Are you from Canada$?

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Eric covered the basics now I will give my 2 cents.......... For beginning have you checked out Grizzly site yet? If not you owe yourself a visit.... They have everything and it is priced right for the beginner woodworker in my opinion.....

Table Saw----- G0690----------1675.00   3 HP Cabinet Saw

Planer-----------G0790----------- 369.00   12 1/2 in planer

Jointer-----------G0656W--------1025.00    8 in. jointer

Band Saw------G0555LNAV---634.00      14 in deluxe band saw

Router Table---Go528-----------568.00      stand alone table--- but I would make my own personally

Router-------------------------------350.00       Porter-Cable 7518  3 1/4 HP variable speed

Grand Total---------------------4621.00

Now this is over your budget but if you don't go to Starbucks for a week you will have saved that much......

And these are not just beginners they are buy it once and give them to your Grand Kids in 40 years..............

Gary

 

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Depends on how much you want the sawstop brake feature.  Personally I think you can be perfectly safe without it if you follow the necessary safety guidelines.  But I can certainly understand why someone would want it.  If you can live without it, you can get grizzly cabinet saw or save $1000 and get a hybrid saw.  If you go with the latter option, that could be more than enough for a bandsaw and still keep the domino.  If you go with a Grizzly 14" ultimate for example that is only $634 with freight.   I'd also go with an 8" jointer.

I think the Domino is fine to get now.  No reason you can't learn traditional joinery for certain projects and use the domino for others.  But it is a big expense.  Not only the tool itself but you have to factor in the extra bits you need, hose (or at least hose fittings), and of course the dominos. 

Lots of options.  Take your time and have fun.

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1 hour ago, Eric. said:

Are you from Canada$?

Hope not, cause then the list would be a B&D workmate & a Princess Auto hand saw.

I didn't look that closely at the SS contractor model, but the PCS is worth the cost even without the safety brake IMO.

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1 hour ago, drzaius said:

I didn't look that closely at the SS contractor model, but the PCS is worth the cost even without the safety brake IMO.

Contractor saw didn't exist when I bought mine so it wasn't a thought but I am with Frank, its a nice saw regardless.

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Thanks so much everyone. 

I am definitely wrestling with the saw choice. The school I was working at had the SS cab 3hp so I guess I was just comfortable with the SS.  

And the the festool I was just thinking would help speed up the built ins face frames etc. but was worried about the extra $ for bits, I hadn't even researched that yet.  Am just tempted by the luxury of the ease and speed.  I have a biscuit joiner.  

I think I will re-look at saw brand, and Festool. and also Clamps!  Hmm. 

Im also hoping maybe to find a Jointer and Bandsaw on Craigslist. 

Thanks for helping a first time (or 2nd?) poster  I obviously have stalked the forums for a while :) 

 

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3 hours ago, Eric. said:

Yep, Domino comes later.  Do traditional M&T for a few years and then you have permission to get lazy.

The Big Five:

Table saw

Jointer

Planer

Bandsaw

Router table

These are your first purchases and if you buy anything else before you own these, you're working backwards.  You also "need" a DC but I don't really consider that a tool so it doesn't make the list.  Whatever you do after The Big Five is up to you and will depend upon the projects you have planned, but The Big Five is not up for debate...because I said so.  Buy the best and biggest you can afford.  That's what I did and I'm now in the process of upgrading all of them.

 

 

Wow I'm accidentally sorta following your directions on accident. I did end up getting a drill press before the bandsaw but it was a gift. 

Curtis said he doesn't have equipment, not that he was a nooblet. If he's been using the university shop for a couple of years, he's probably cut some mortise and tenon. One hopes?

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I too would recommend bumping up to the PCS cabinet saw vs. the contractor saw even if it meant saving for a little while longer. That said, if you're looking at the SawStop PCS, don't overlook the 1.75 HP model. I've been using mine for over a year (most of that time with the stock blade that came with the saw. Only just recently upgraded to a Forrest blade) and have not had any problems with the motor getting bogged down - even when ripping 12/4 ash.

I was really concerned the motor wasn't going to be powerful enough before I purchased it because of what I had read on forums and I just have not experienced it. I haven't had to use a thin kerf blade. Yes, you have to adjust your feed rate and feed the material a bit slower if you're ripping something like 12/4 ash, but it's not like you're talking about resawing on an undersized bandsaw. It's only slightly slower than my typical feed rate.

So, think about what materials you are likely to be using. If you're going to be mostly working with plywood and domestic species, the 1.75 HP is probably more than sufficient. If you're going to be ripping 8/4 bubinga regularly, yeah.. the extra power on the 3HP model would probably come in handy. Something to consider, at least.

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I agree drop the Domino, they're lame (cuz i dot have one yet). And if youre not die-hard for Sawstop you could save a few bucks there on a 3hp Grizz or a Laguna or Powermatic hybrid. That way you can crosscut hotdogs like a boss. And that leaves money for a decent bandsaw.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

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As much as I've soured on Grizzly in the last few years, I can't recommend a new woodworker on a budget buy a SawStop.  If you have unlimited funds, great, it's a no-brainer.  But you can get so many other tools with what that one table saw will cost that it just doesn't make sense.

A lifetime is a long time...buy some starter tools that you can afford now, build a bunch of stuff, save up for the nice toys and slowly replace the beaters over the next five or ten or twenty years.  You'll appreciate them that much more because of it.

FWIW, my Grizzly table saw is the one Grizzly I own that I have no complaints about (since I've replaced the fence :) ).  YMMV

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Just starting out buying a lot of tools, the big tools you can plan for and see where the budget goes.

It's buying your twentieth clamp, that fifth router bit, the second zero clearance insert, the new miter gauge, a decent mortise chisel set, the dado stack, a new random orbit sander... none of those things costs a lot but there are a lot of <$200 things that I seem to keep buying. So keep that in mind.

With your list, I would seriously consider downgrading the saw to a cheaper hybrid type so you can afford to pick up a dust collector and bandsaw. Probably dropping the domino (although I hope to pick one up fairly 'early' on). Working in the house trying to keep dust controlled, dust collection will become a priority. I just picked up Oneida's new molded mini gorilla and it is pretty neat. Throughout the house a regular shop vac with a nicer hose and some upgrades like a dust deputy can go a long way and be a fair bit cheaper than the Festool or Bosch options.

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Well, I had a long reply typed up and when I posted it, it deleted it somehow. Regardless most of what I had to say has been said, so no loss there. I think spending 2/3rd of your budget on an easy MT solution and a contractor saw is sorta foolish. I can't argue with convenience and safety, but I can argue with the gaping holes it will leave in your Arsenal. I would suggest going for the general tools, because at least you will be able to do tasks--albeit, slower and less convenient than a specialized tool could. Example, router with edge guide and router table with a fence can replace the domino. Domino is faster, but the router with edge guide and a router table can do umpteen more tasks that the domino can't. My last suggestion is towards the jointer. This is maybe the most overlooked tool for everyone, in my opinion. "The table saw is the heart of the shop!" Sure, it may be, but your table saw is nothing more than a gentle curve cutting machine without a good jointer next to it. Unless you are a turner or carver, you really don't have much if you don't have flat/square material. If you think a 6" will do it for you, then please go on Craigslist and buy a used machine. just don't settle for the crappiest jointer on the planet and spend $2,000 on a table saw. I can get behind that logic if you only work with sheet goods, but I can't if you work with solid wood. Then again, if you only work with sheet goods, then I would be voting for a track saw system over a contractor table saw to begin with. Best of luck to you, $4500 is some awesome coin to start with upfront. I think I started with $75 ?

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FYI, HF Dust Collector went back on sale for $169. Google Harbor Freight 20% off coupon and it goes down to $134. I shipped mine instead of driving an hour to get it so my price went back up $21. Plus $8 tax.  

Just a heads up if you are considering DC.

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Not sure if you made your decision yet, but it might be worth looking at some of the used combo machines. I see them on the market from time to time, and I think you get a lot of bang for your buck. Nearly all of them are euro made and could be classified as "light industrial". I think they are made for the one man professional in Europe, but some hobbyists pick them up here in America. They usually sit forever on the used market because they are expensive(guys trying to recoup most of their upfront investment) and a niche market. For a guy who needs everything off the bat, this might be a good buy for you. Don't know where you are located, but here are 2 within 2 hours of me.

 

https://cleveland.craigslist.org/tls/5380436957.html

https://columbus.craigslist.org/tls/5381171671.html

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On 1/29/2016 at 5:57 PM, Curtis said:

Thanks so much everyone. 

I am definitely wrestling with the saw choice. The school I was working at had the SS cab 3hp so I guess I was just comfortable with the SS.  

And the the festool I was just thinking would help speed up the built ins face frames etc. but was worried about the extra $ for bits, I hadn't even researched that yet.  Am just tempted by the luxury of the ease and speed.  I have a biscuit joiner.  

I think I will re-look at saw brand, and Festool. and also Clamps!  Hmm. 

Im also hoping maybe to find a Jointer and Bandsaw on Craigslist. 

Thanks for helping a first time (or 2nd?) poster  I obviously have stalked the forums for a while :) 

 

I would look for much of what you want on the used market, if it were me.  Unless you overpay, you can turn around and sell them for what you paid when you have a little more cabbage to upgrade later.

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As much as I like SawStop, I can't recommend you spend the money on that at this point. The buy once thing just isn't always practical. I had a Jet contractor saw for years that worked really well & was not expensive. The Bies fence on it was though.

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A couple people glossed over dust collection a bit, but in a small, enclosed  environment like that I'd recommend a good dust collection system be added in there as a must have with your initial list. Seriously consider what what type of materials you'll be using. Sheets goods or lumber? Then move from there. Festool is a great option for working with sheet goods, in my opinion. You already have a router, so that can be used for dadoes and many other things. A bandsaw is also more useful than one might think. There are options for working without a jointer as well, such as a planer sled for faces and a router table for edges. My point, I think, is that traditional is great but there's also many different ways to approach building. Think about you work and materials and grow from there. Then again, I'm new around here and probably a heretic to many because I don't own a table saw and really don't plan on getting one soon. 

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