Dtxdude125

Citristrip stained my table!

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I've been looking on here to see if anyone has the same problem and it looks like they haven't. 

I bought this old mid century coffee table which I believe is walnut and sanded a lot of it down the other day. I decided to use citristrip to try and get the rest of the varnish off and make it easier and it has now stained my table! It won't come off at all and almost looks like I added a varnish... I've tried using denatured alcohol and mineral spirits to get it off but it won't work, please help!!

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I don't have any experience with Citrisrip, but if it were me, I'd contact the manufacturer and see what they suggest.

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Hi - am having the same problem. I used citristrip first on the flat surface of a round oak coffee table I am working on to strip it. It did a fair job but left some more tenacious bits around the edges. I then applied it to only the edges of the table. On the second time applying it to the edges, it stained the wood. I have tried mineral spirits and KleanStrip but it’s not removing the stain. 
OP - Were you ever able to get the stain out? 
TIA. 

0AA3692C-C8EF-43A9-B4A2-8BDDB6ACEAAE.jpeg

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I would contact the companies tech support people. Chances are they have heard this question before.

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Have you tried the stripper itself? As I recall, it comes as a gel and is supposed to be kept from drying. Maybe test a small area with fresh stripper? Also, that does not look like veneer. I’d be tempted to see what light sanding achieved before trying a ton of other chemicals. Not arguing with the post above. Just suggesting a thing or two to try if their tech support is not helpful. 

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It is not uncommon for porous materials like wood to react that way. Doesn't matter if the applied material is stain, paint, or stripper. The area that has had two applications is going to appear different. Sanding to a fresh surface is probably the fastest remedy, but you might also try repeated applications of the Citristrip to the entire surface, and using a nylon scrup brush to work the material evenly along the grain, until the color is uniform.

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Here is what makes me suspect this is dried stripper. You were stripping the edge. Notice the unaffected portions at the edge contrasting with darker toward the center. I suspect the area of focus was applied more heavily, and stayed damp. (Red) 

969B46F9-E8F4-4461-88AF-D3F83FB705D0.jpeg

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