Which blade for lots of plywood?


rodger.
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Doing some ripping of plywood sheets on the TS.  I am currently using my rip blade, but I was wondering if a combo blade would be more appropriate.  I don't really need a dedicated plywood blade, so I would just like to use one of the three blades I have (Rip 24T, combo 40T or combo 50T).  All blades are high quality blades, and are clean and sharp.  Which one is best?

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More teeth is better. My plywood saw holds a 60tooth blade (7.25") and it works wonderfully for ply doesn't tear out nearly as much. I break down sheets with a circ saw because i don't have enough room to maneuver a full sheet in my shop.

I've also done the arguably unsafe climb cut that Matthias Wandel suggested to get clean ply cuts and it works well.

https://woodgears.ca/shop-tricks/tearout.html

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More teeth is better. For a cleaner tearout free cut, you can lower the blade and take a small scoring of the underside that's about 1/16" deep before raising the blade to complete the cut. I did that a bunch on the vanity when I did the drawer faces, just for extra tear out protection. A Zero Clearance insert will also help.

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I use the Forrest Duraline AT blade for plywood and surfaced goods. I get very little to no tearout on either face. No a cheap blade, but since I seem to cut a lot of sheet goods, worth every penny to me. It is a 60 tooth, high ATB blade.

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I'd use a 40T or 50T over a dedicated ripping blade....both will leave a better cut.  If all else is equal, I think the 50T will have better edge life than the 40T.  If your plywood volumes are really high, and cut quality isn't a top priority, it might be worth looking into a blade with a triple chip grind (TCG)...best edge life of all other grinds. .For best cut quality, a good Hi-ATB grind will be hard to beat, but edge life isn't as good.

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+1 to the more teeth is better camp.  I use an 80T 10" on my TS for plywood and get pretty good results.

For better chipout control there are 3 things you can do:

  • plywood blade (60 or 80T on a 10" blade).
  • zero clearance insert.
  • scribe the keeper side of the kerf with a knife.

Blue tape can help but I find it a bit of a nuisance.

Another way to improve chipout is to use higher quality plywood like baltic birch.

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Thanks for all the replies fellas.  I have used the blue tape trick many times with ply, but I have 4 full sheets to break down into many pieces.  This is too much material to realistically use blue tape.  I'll switch out the blade for the 50T, and continue to use my ZCI.

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Good suggestions.  I would add to put your show face up on a table saw too.  That way the blade is going "into" the show face as it cuts, compressing the fibres into the wood instead of trying to tear it out as if exits.  Opposite for a circular saw, show face down.

 

This works:

 

 

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