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53 minutes ago, Janello said:

But...then it's not even a sentence. lol

I guess I should replace braniac with "pompous ass know it all" and calculator with knowing how to find information rather than thinking you know everything. :)

My buddy tells me stories about the highly edjucated engineers where he works that want to rip a whole machine apart before checking the gas valve. I'm not implying anyone here is a pompous ass, just saying I'd rather be the guy that checks the gas valve first and then pulls out a manual if I have to.

Well I meant to adjust the sentence appropriately. "Common sense usually trumps anyone that can't see the forest through the trees." I didn't type what I meant there. My bad sir.

But yeah I know the types you are talking about and on occasion I've been that guy too. There are so many factors that can play into a jaunt off into stupidity-land. As a programmer, I gotta do debugging and troubleshooting all the time and sometimes I run into an issue where my assumptions turned out to be invalid and I wasted a half hour trying to troubleshoot the wrong issue. It happens, feels like ass, but you learn and move on and hopefully avoid that in the future. But I just don't see the correlation between educated/smart and that. It's experience or .. sometimes just the amount of coffee you got before you started in on it. I know this is far off the fence thing, but just my thoughts there. I don't like blanket statements much and to me it seems like "common sense" is defined as "I didn't do something stupid that time!" Anyone is capable of making that mistake, regardless of education, gender, hair color, etc. :D

 

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Then I'll blame you for then teaching my kids that division is 8 goats divided by 3 blue rocks equals friendship. 

There's a lot I'd like to say here that I won't say, in light of the no politics rule.  I'll leave it at this... PARENTS are the big problem in this country, not teachers.

We discovered very quickly in middle school that the 'social skills' our son was learning were the kind most likely to get him a mug shot. We went home school, and never turned back. He has learning

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11 minutes ago, Tom Cancelleri said:

 I never understood people who didn't understand math. It seems so second nature to me. 

I never understood people who didn't understand people who didn't understand math, because people who don't understand math should be pretty easy to understand for people who do understand math.

 

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21 minutes ago, Immortan D said:

I never understood people who didn't understand people who didn't understand math, because people who don't understand math should be pretty easy to understand for people who do understand math.

 

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48 minutes ago, Tom Cancelleri said:

Can you guys explain this math stuff to me? Measure 38 times, cut once.... Buy more wood do it again!

Kidding of course. I never understood people who didn't understand math. It seems so second nature to me. 

Just a bit more for those who may not understand the 5-cut *process*. 

First, always rotate the edge of the cut toward the fence. If your block is to the left of the blade then rotate the block clockwise; to the right, counter-clockwise. If you rotate it the other way it will never work.

Interestingly the 5-cut method does NOT require that one start with a square piece of wood.  The first cut creates the initial reference edge.  The next three follow it and the fifth creates the 4x difference off the reference.  So you can start with an odd trapezoid and end up with the same difference on the final cut as if you had begun with a perfect square.  Again, it's just geometry.

But if one doesn't grasp geometry, think of it as a sequence of multiplication and subtraction.  Multiplying the difference until the last cut and subtracting excess material with each successive cut. One need not understand it to apply it.  (If one had to understand it all few would be using computers, that's fer sure.)

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1 minute ago, collinb said:

Just a bit more for those who may not understand the 5-cut *process*. 

First, always rotate the edge of the cut toward the fence. If your block is to the left of the blade then rotate the block clockwise; to the right, counter-clockwise. If you it the other way and it will never work.

Interestingly the 5-cut method does NOT require that one start with a square piece of wood.  The first cut creates the initial reference edge.  The next three follow it and the fifth creates the 4x difference off the reference.  So you can start with an odd trapezoid and end up with the same difference on the final cut as if you had begun with a perfect square.  Again, it's just geometry.

But if one doesn't grasp geometry, think of it as a sequence of multiplication and subtraction.  Multiplying the difference until the last cut and subtracting excess material with each successive cut. One need not understand it to apply it.  (If one had to understand it all few would be using computers, that's fer sure.)

I was being facetious. I am familiar with the 5 cut process and the math behind it. William Ng has a great video on it. 

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34 minutes ago, Tom Cancelleri said:

I was being facetious. I am familiar with the 5 cut process and the math behind it. William Ng has a great video on it. 

I realized too late that perhaps I shouldn't have quoted you.

I think that while people understand the *method* they may not fully grasp the *process* which Ng does not explain.  (Which also he did not need to explain.) 

I find there is always a segment of readers who want the theoretical how it works as much as the practical how it works. Let's call it "Philosophy of Woodworking, 101."

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36 minutes ago, collinb said:

Just a bit more for those who may not understand the 5-cut *process*. 

First, always rotate the edge of the cut toward the fence. If your block is to the left of the blade then rotate the block clockwise; to the right, counter-clockwise. If you rotate it the other way it will never work.

Interestingly the 5-cut method does NOT require that one start with a square piece of wood.  The first cut creates the initial reference edge.  The next three follow it and the fifth creates the 4x difference off the reference.  So you can start with an odd trapezoid and end up with the same difference on the final cut as if you had begun with a perfect square.  Again, it's just geometry.

But if one doesn't grasp geometry, think of it as a sequence of multiplication and subtraction.  Multiplying the difference until the last cut and subtracting excess material with each successive cut. One need not understand it to apply it.  (If one had to understand it all few would be using computers, that's fer sure.)

OMG thank yo so much for pointing this out I was about to turn mine into fire wood!! Thinking about it now it makes total sense but after 5 tries on Saturday I was like easy my a#$. I will go out tonight and see if I can finish it up :)

 

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Just now, pkinneb said:

OMG thank yo so much for pointing this out I was about to turn mine into fire wood!! Thinking about it now it makes total sense but after 5 tries on Saturday I was like easy my a#$. I will go out tonight and see if I can finish it up :)

 

Glad I could help.

Something that also helped me was, when putting in the final screw, predrilling it with a countersink so that the screw would go in easily.  First time I did it I couldn't get the screw in far enough and had to remove it, negating my effort.  Reboot. 

I also clamped it before removing it fully from the tracks for screwing.  It's just too difficult for me to get underneath it to put in the screw.  That way the screw can go in straight because you'll be able to control the angle of the screw much better, reducing any minute pulling.

(If you have a pin nailer ...) Also, to get that equidistant point for the adjustment I pin-nailed a scrap piece of oak on the inside of the sled for setting the adjustment.  The pins shot in also pop out easily.  Come to think of it, that might have been a good idea for setting the fence position before putting in the mounting screw.  But, alas, it is done and good.

Hope yours works out well, too.

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5 hours ago, collinb said:

Glad I could help.

Something that also helped me was, when putting in the final screw, predrilling it with a countersink so that the screw would go in easily.  First time I did it I couldn't get the screw in far enough and had to remove it, negating my effort.  Reboot. 

I also clamped it before removing it fully from the tracks for screwing.  It's just too difficult for me to get underneath it to put in the screw.  That way the screw can go in straight because you'll be able to control the angle of the screw much better, reducing any minute pulling.

(If you have a pin nailer ...) Also, to get that equidistant point for the adjustment I pin-nailed a scrap piece of oak on the inside of the sled for setting the adjustment.  The pins shot in also pop out easily.  Come to think of it, that might have been a good idea for setting the fence position before putting in the mounting screw.  But, alas, it is done and good.

Hope yours works out well, too.

Worked great made one set of cuts (the right way) after one adjustment was off .001 over 22" :)

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On 4/6/2016 at 4:31 AM, collinb said:

Get a slide rule. No batteries. 2 digits accuracy. Faster than a calculator for most common operations.

Sent from my MotoE2(4G-LTE) using Tapatalk

I'm in a different age class, but I ALWAYS have my phone at hand. I can't imagine keeping track of a slide rule, much less my pocket protector and bakelite glasses.

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3 hours ago, PlaneAndDestroy said:

I'm in a different age class, but I ALWAYS have my phone at hand. I can't imagine keeping track of a slide rule, much less my pocket protector and bakelite glasses.

Them's fightin' words . . . :D

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How did I ever get an education with paper flash cards, memorizing the multiplication tables, long hand writing with a fountain pen and, yes, slide rules?

I remember when the first calculators came out like the Texas Instruments SR-10.  If you didn't know how to set up the problem (do you divide or mulitply?), the calculator did you no good.  You got the wrong answer to 9 decimal points.

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8 hours ago, TIODS said:

That's because today they teach you how to take a test and run to an electronic device to solve a problem rather than teach you the actual information you need to solve the problem on your own.  Our education system sucks!

Wait TIODS, tell us how you really feel. :)  Even in the early 70's as a high-school senior I took basic math as an elective since the school system was quite content to let me graduate with really substandard skills in that area.  I lived through the "new math -- oh, never mind we were wrong, go back to the old away" era of education. Thank goodness for college.

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1 hour ago, gee-dub said:

Wait TIODS, tell us how you really feel. :)  Even in the early 70's as a high-school senior I took basic math as an elective since the school system was quite content to let me graduate with really substandard skills in that area.  I lived through the "new math -- oh, never mind we were wrong, go back to the old away" era of education. Thank goodness for college.

Colleges are just as bad if not worse.  Frankly, they're all only interested in money, not education.

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Just now, wtnhighlander said:

We discovered very quickly in middle school that the 'social skills' our son was learning were the kind most likely to get him a mug shot. We went home school, and never turned back. He has learning disabilities, but scored 8% higher on his standardized IQ test after a couple years of home school. If you think home school stigma is bad, try it with a special needs student. Stigma stinks, no matter if the results are good.

Good for you. Impressed. 

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1 minute ago, wtnhighlander said:

Its all my wife, 100%. I'm sure he learns a few things from me ... bad habits, mostly!?

Even with those "bad habits" it's still a far better education that he'd get in any public system!

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it does my heart good to see folks like you and your wife doing the right thing and the best thing for your child, not easy is an understatement, i always knew you were a good man Ross, lets hope the "bad habits" he picks up from you are woodworking

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