IAHawk

Under Cabinet Lights for workbench

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Hello,

I am looking for some suggestions for lighting to go under my cabinets that hang above my new work bench I am building. I would prefer bright lights that I can use a switch to turn them on. I have found several options but most seem to need a transformer or need to be plugged into an outlet.

Also looking for a way to add a number of outlets just above the workbench top without have to install a bunch of outlets, this to I would like it to be hard wired and not use a plug in system.

The work bench is going to be about 10' long, it is not finished yet, but the cabinet are already installed. I do not have any pictures yet but can take some and post them if that would help.

 

Thank you

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LED strips are great under cabinets:

https://www.superbrightleds.com/cat/flexible-strips-and-bars/

And a long power bar like this is a quick way to add outlets:

http://m.harborfreight.com/12-outlet-4-ft-metal-power-strip-62494.html?utm_referrer=direct%2Fnot%20provided

Just remember that the load capacity is still only what the original feed circuit provides!

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Lee Valley sells highly configurable LED tape & extrusions to mount in as well as the switches, dimmers, drivers connectors etc.

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For the lights do you have to use a transformer or can you just hard wire it into the circuit and use a switch?

I imagine for the power strip you can hard wire it into the circuit, just cur of the plug and connect it to the a box in the wall.

One of the issues I have found with LED lighting is that it is not very bright, unless they have improved over the years.

Thanks for the suggestions

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Most under cabinet LED fixtures require a separate driver the come with a cord & plug. You can install a switched receptacle, or they commonly have a switch right on the driver, or an inline switch on the cord.

It's pretty simple stuff & very DIY friendly.

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In response to IAHawk, LEDs have made great strides in the past couple of years. You still need to be aware of the Lumen output, Color temperature, and CRI, so as to best meet your application.

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24 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

In response to IAHawk, LEDs have made great strides in the past couple of years. You still need to be aware of the Lumen output, Color temperature, and CRI, so as to best meet your application.

I have noticed that LED bulbs tend to have a strobe effect.  I stopped using them for that reason.  I haven't found bulbs that don't trigger a headache (although I haven't look too hard).    Do any of those specs indicate a bulbs that has a less noticeable strobe?  For example, last night we were at a restaurant and the LEDs made me feel motion sickness.  My wife did not notice the strobing unless I waved my hand.  then it became obvious. But I could notice the light bouncing off the walls and table.  

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The strobe effect is one of the perils of cheap no-name LED products. If you go shopping for the cheapest stuff on ebay, that's what you might get, along with short life, severe lumen depreciation, wide color temperature variation and poor color rendering.

For example, you can get LED tape for just a few $ per meter at the low end, or at the high end, we install LED tape in retail display cases that is almost $250/meter. You don't need to go that crazy though.

Buy from a place you can trust & that has the product on display so you can assure yourself that there is no objectionable strobe effect, the color temp is right & there is enough lumen output. If you do work that requires good color rendering, like stain selection or color matching, then get something with a CRI of 90 or above.

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LED strobe is not at all common as they are almost all DC driven. FL is where strobing gets me and that is usually indicative of cheap ballasts. 

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I agree with Carus. Although I have noticed the strobe effect with cheaper LED fixtures, I am much more bothered by it in Flourescents.

LED lighting (of quality) has a higher startup cost, but the results are worth it. With good hardware, you can usually reduce energy and maintenance costs to the point that payback is very short.

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If you want something very bright look at the puck lights by Lighting Ever (LE)

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LE5J4WK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awd_uCTgxb6DYTTT3

They run about $9. I bought 7 of them for my kitchen and plan to put them in this weekend. As mentioned you'll need a 12 volt driver for them. You can use a decent gauge speaker wire (18-16)to make the connections. These run 3 watts each and are considerably brighter than strip lights and are setup in a flood pattern to cast wide light.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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