Dust collection advice needed!!


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I have a bit of construction knowledge but not a lot of woodworking.  I have spent the last 15 years remodeling my house, a couple of rentals we own and a couple of houses we "flipped".  I have spent the last two years building my barn and finishing my workshop.  I'm  just now getting to building my cabinets and benches and am in desperate need of dust control.  I can live with sweeping shavings but the fine dust is not only hazardous but miserable.  I have a shop vac / dust collector and have seen some schematics for home made cyclone systems that run off those.  I'm not in a position to purchase new system right now and I don't know enough about them to judge some of these schematics for the "home made" ones.   Should I just muddle through trying to attach the shopvac to the sanders on a piece by piece basis or can somebody point me toward a credible schematic that would be worth the money and effort to build it.  Recently had back surgery and have had a lot of bed rest time I used internet searching and found the wood whisperer website and videos...they are excellent...2 weeks of binge watching and I'm itching to get back at it!!  Any advice would be appreciated...Thanks in advance.

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First, spend the $15 and get a quality mask if you haven't already.  If you spend that much time in any construction, its a no brainer.  From here, your immediate health should be protected, so long as you actually wear it (easier said than done).  The linked model is surprisingly comfortable though.

The budget will dictate the quality of DC you get.  You can search endless posts, and advice, and mine would just be one more.  So far, I haven't found any shortcuts.  If you have more time than budget, build your own system (Stumpy Nubs) has some decent information if you want to go this route.  If your time is more limited, there is no shortage of commercial units and solutions.  ClearVue, Onieda, Tempest, etc. etc.

 

I'd plan your DC like any other tool.  Spend what you need to get what you really want the first time.  I can tell you I have dumped too much money into progressively better solutions, and wish I'd have just saved my money and bought a real workhorse. Even a cheap DC will be a huge upgrade to a shopvac, but I'd really recommend starting with a full sized cyclone system.   At least $1000 on the very low end...probably too low end.  
 

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The answer to this question is going to depend on what machines you are trying to add dust control to and what is your budget. Assuming you don't want to spend much then your best bet is to buy a 2hp harbor freight dust collector. A lot of folks here either own one or have owned one previously and its pretty good for what it is and light years beyond a simple shopvac.

http://www.harborfreight.com/2-hp-industrial-5-micron-dust-collector-97869.html

Depending on budget you will want to replace the filter of course with something that traps finer particles. Folks really like the wynn canister filters.

http://wynnenv.com/woodworking-filters/

You can get a lot done by moving this from machine to machine and just skipping the whole ducting situation. If you get to a point where you want to add some more functionality you can add a second stage to it.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/158396/Super-Dust-Deputy-Mold-Cyclone.aspx?gclid=Cj0KEQjwl-e4BRCwqeWkv8TWqOoBEiQAMocbP8qBs0BGbs-FL3u4L0h93iyn_hAPulmulyioK8txmRoaAp3S8P8HAQ

That is about as far as you can take a harbor freight collector and it will do pretty good for single machine use and there are folks that do duct it in and run their whole shops on it. I have the harbor freight collector right now still using it with the original stock setup and I just wear a respirator when in the shop. I am getting ready to first add more electricity to my shop and then add a cyclone dust collector of some type (likely a grizzly 3hp model) along with ducting and an air filter. That is probably more then what you want to spend though.

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I hate to say it but the 3m respirators while terribly uncool and not the most ideal are probably the best thing for a quick cheap dust solution. I have worn mine probably at least 4 hours a day nearly every day for the last 2 years. I can't stress how awesome it is for anything that kicks up dust, heck i used it mowing the lawn some times. They are comfortable and not only knock out dust they often knock out bad smells even with the pink filters.

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Thanks for the input guys.  All of you have hit various parts of my dilemma on the head.  I will eventually put in a nice system and ducting will be no problem but my shop is full of tools that need to be upgraded because I didn't wait and buy a good one so I don't want to waste significant time and money until I can put in the proper system.  Unfortunately using just the mask isn't going to be sufficient.  My shop is also my cave if you will and the coat of fine dust I'm cleaning off of 900 sq ft of my stuff isn't going to cut it.  Not to mention my dog's lungs are just as important as mine and no matter how much beer I feed him I can't get him to wear a respirator...The shop vac I have is made for fine dust like drywall or concrete so it can get me by.  It is just really inefficient to keep switching around and loud.  I will look into the harbor freight option and check out Stumpy Nubs.  I'm not familiar with him/that but guessing a Google search will get me there eventually!  I've been looking forward to the day I could start some woodworking.  I've got the space, the basic tools and finally a little time!!  Tons to learn...pretty exciting for me!!

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I would say just do it right the first time if you can manage it. It's such a waste of time and money to put in something that you think is temporary and just to get by until you can do it the proper way.

You say your machines are in need of upgrading but why add a dust collection system that is in need of upgrading too? That just adds to the headache later.

I have about a 1000 square foot shop and my first dust collector will hopefully be my last. I checked craigslist daily and eventually found a 2hp Oneida cyclone system with a nice leeson motor for $900. I went to an hvac supply place and bought 6 inch 26 Guage ducting for way cheaper than you'd expect. I probably spent $300 for all the pipe and fittings for I think 5 drops. It's been a dream to have.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

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This might inspire you! Loads of vids on you tube for this, most using a shop vac to run the cyclone although this guy has used the dyson motor- trickiest bit is finding a rigid enough sealable drum.

You may be surprised how cheap used/broken dysons are - you may even be able to get for free.

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That is pretty cool, Chud.  I actually have an industrial shop vac meant for concrete dust and drywall dust.  Industrial Contractors Supply TP-12.  I got it at a garage sale for $40.  Everything works just needed a new filter and bags.  Was ecstatic to look it up on the Internet and find out it is a $500 plus vac.  Filters to .3 microns.  Not so happy to find that the filter cost me $85.  With all of my best intentions I'm probably going to end up with $200 wrapped up into a makeshift system that is going to ultimately need to be upgraded.  I guess we can all disregard my above posts about not wanting to do that to myself again. Nwhomesteader is exactly right but unfortunately I'm not in a position to lay out the thousand or so to do it right but I have to do something to address the dust immediately.

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