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battery powered circular saw?

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What are the feelings on battery powered circular saws? If I have plenty of batteries since Makita makes it and I have bought into their system ... 

Are they worth the money or should I just suck it up and get a corded one?

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I only use them for rough construction and have never tried a battery version.  My biggest fear would be that they're severely underpowered for normal construction use.  They may be fine for breaking down sheet goods?

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ya mainly my use would be breaking down sheet goods or quickly cutting some boards randomly to fix something easily. This would not be in a construction environment 

I was thinking this saw ... http://www.homedepot.com/p/Makita-18-Volt-LXT-Lithium-Ion-Brushless-6-1-2-in-Cordless-Circular-Saw-Tool-Only-XSH03Z/205875583

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My understanding is the Milwaukee Fuel is a very good cordless saw.  I'm not sure, but I bet Makita has a close competitor. 

I have a 18V Ryobi cordless circular saw and it's like a toy.  I think I will let my daughter chew on it when she starts teething.

My feeling is it won't likely replace a corded saw, but the cord free convenience can certainly be useful.

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I have the ridgid cordless circ saw.  There is no way it could replace a corded saw.

That being said, I find it very handy.  I take it (and a second battery) to the lumberyard to break down material for transport.  I can rip four sheets of ply in half without fully draining a battery.

If you want to rip 8/4 hardwood, forget it.  Cross cutting 4/4 is fine, have done lots of that as well.

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I have a worm drive skill saw that is corded and I have a Dewalt cordless... they do not compare in the power end of things, but I was always please with what the Dewalt WAS capable.  But it would not be the only one in my tool box.  Its a good portable option for quick jobs but not an all day beast.

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I have the single battery Makita cordless circular saw, and have surprised myself how much I both use it, and like it.  It's very smooth, and I can cut anything as well as I can with a tailed one.  My only complaint is that the dust chute works so well that it dumps all the sawdust in my shoe.

I had a previous model that used the big oval 18v non-LI batteries, and I never liked that one that much, but there were times that it was just so much easier to use than dragging out a cord.  If anyone has any use for that one, I'll send it to you.

The newer model is way better than the older one.

I just saw the link to the brushless one in your previous post.  Mine is not the brushless one, and I do use it on construction sites.  I bought mine less the battery for less than a hundred bucks a couple of years ago.  I wouldn't pay almost a hundred buck premium for brushless.

Here's the one I have, and the one I would buy again.  I use tools for a living, and get to deduct every dollar I spend on tools, but still don't throw them (dollars) away.

http://www.cpooutlets.com/factory-reconditioned-makita-xss02z-r-18v-cordless-lxt-lithium-ion-6-1-2-in--circular-saw--bare-tool-/mktrxss02z-r,default,pd.html&antisku=antiskuB&gclid=CjwKEAjwxoG5BRCC7ezlzNmR8HUSJAAre36jl68lqDzUYrnKTSc6mLBYOvqiNKdkQ9QWQJ8WJsIMTRoC51Dw_wcB&zmap=mktrxss02z-r&zmac=722&zmas=47&zmam=31282435&ref=pla

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I have the Dewalt 18v cordless. 3 cuts on plywood and battery is over. It doesn't cut square, not sure if that can be fixed or not. The cut is decent if you change blades to be the appropriate type. 

Wouldn't buy it again, but then when i bought it I had no interest in woodworking.

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13 minutes ago, Tom King said:

I have the single battery Makita cordless circular saw, and have surprised myself how much I both use it, and like it.  It's very smooth, and I can cut anything as well as I can with a tailed one.  My only complaint is that the dust chute works so well that it dumps all the sawdust in my shoe.

I had a previous model that used the big oval 18v non-LI batteries, and I never liked that one that much, but there were times that it was just so much easier to use than dragging out a cord.  If anyone has any use for that one, I'll send it to you.

The newer model is way better than the older one.

how many cuts can you make before you need to charge? Lets say you are breaking down 4x8 ply?

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I have a PC and use it for breaking down boards to fit safely in the car.  I rough cut 20 4/4x6 cedar boards before battery died.  

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I have a Milwaukee M18 Fuel Circ Saw.  It's been great. Obviously it doesn't have the power of my Wormdrive.  But unless I'm doing a lot of framing, or Cutting bigger beams, I don't really need it. It's great for smaller jobs.  Plenty of power and with the new 5.0 batteries the run time is even better. Can't say I've really ever counted cuts. But it seems to last a good while. The Rafter hook is a nice feature. Not sure if the competitors have them.   I Bought the 6 1/2 instead of the 7 1/4 because the blade is on the left like my big saw. Plus I like the lightness, especially on a ladder! 

I think if you're looking a the current generation of brushless pro level tools you'll be pleased by their performance. If you're looking a the the more DIY'er aimed tools, you're less likely to be satisfied if you're really putting it to work. Really depends on    I will say that since I got the Fuel Saw, the Wormdrive stays at home way more often!  

 

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I'm not sure about the number of cuts.  I don't think I've ever run one battery down while doing what I needed to with it.  I built a bathroom vanity cabinet one day using it when I was too far away from home to run back and forth, and didn't have many tools with me.  I don't remember batteries dying ever being an issue with it. 

Another decent sized job I remember doing with it was framing a basement bathroom, and utility room with it.  Sometimes it gets used because it doesn't throw sawdust as badly as a tailed circular saw, and in the basement job that was why it got the call.  We did that one rainy morning, and did all the sawing in the basement.

The charger works so fast that I don't remember running both batteries down, and having to wait because the first one wasn't charged yet with any of those tools.  I just haven't found any reason at all to pay a premium price for the brushless tools, and I do this for a living. 

The impact driver has been used all day for more than a few days over the years that I've owned it.  I can't say how many hundreds of pounds of screws I've driven with it, but did drive 5 pounds with it yesterday.  I'm still on the original two batteries that came in the LXT kit several years ago.

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I have a Milwaukee 18V (not Fuel) that I really like. I just used it last night to cut a bunch of 1 1/8" beech counter top You have to go slow, but the cut is almost glue line ready. For sheet goods it has plenty of power. So much easier to use than my corded saw that it hardly ever gets used anymore.

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Ya for what I can envision it would be mainly used to break down big sheet goods to get them ready for the table saw for the most part. Unless it ends up being a great straight line cutter and then I would just do more with it on the sheet goods if it turns out to be easier.

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Personally, if you arent cutting stuff while hanging from trusses i see no point in having one. I have done roughing for years, finish and obviously cabinetry and woodworking, used cordless but never needed it nor found it particularly useful or nice to use. Iv never touched one that didnt feel like it had its bullocks lopped off.

I have a makita side winder that is about half as old as i am and still runs great, an 8 1/2" worm drive that can cut through most anything without the motor even slowing down significantly no matter how fast you are cutting and an old black and decker that IS as old as i am but is like 4lbs and is great for when cutting above head or whatever.

So many cons and the only pro is you dont have to run a cord.... which if you are in a shop isnt even a seconds effort.

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38 minutes ago, Miles11we said:

Personally, if you arent cutting stuff while hanging from trusses i see no point in having one. I have done roughing for years, finish and obviously cabinetry and woodworking, used cordless but never needed it nor found it particularly useful or nice to use. Iv never touched one that didnt feel like it had its bullocks lopped off.

I have a makita side winder that is about half as old as i am and still runs great, an 8 1/2" worm drive that can cut through most anything without the motor even slowing down significantly no matter how fast you are cutting and an old black and decker that IS as old as i am but is like 4lbs and is great for when cutting above head or whatever.

So many cons and the only pro is you dont have to run a cord.... which if you are in a shop isnt even a seconds effort.

You make good points there. Yet when I'm in my shop, with receptacles all around the walls and both corded & cordless saws just steps away, why do I almost always choose the cordless? Because it's lighter & easier to handle.

If I could have only one, though, I'd have a corded one

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With drills i use cordless all the time, even when i probably should use something with more mass and torque. Maybe im just really biased when it comes to saws. Also possible that the newer ones arent as crap as the ones i used, considering i havent used any in probably 5 years. 

 

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A few years ago I invested in the Milwaukee 28 volt kit. Came with a decent circular saw, reciprocating saw, hammer drill and a flash-light. I've replaced the batteries once and have gotten good use out of the circular saw. I did upgrade the blade. I use the saw for sheet goods in conjunction with a Bora edge guide. I would recommend it if asked. The flash-lights that come in these kits always amuse me, don't get much use from them.

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1 hour ago, Miles11we said:

With drills i use cordless all the time, even when i probably should use something with more mass and torque. Maybe im just really biased when it comes to saws. Also possible that the newer ones arent as crap as the ones i used, considering i havent used any in probably 5 years. 

 

I had an early 18V Dewalt that was truly horrible & it rarely got used.

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The newest generation is many factors better than previous generations.  I keep mine in the toolbox on the truck for when I need one, and am separated from the rest of my tools.

I have an old electric chainsaw I use working on old houses too.  I run a dry chain on it, so as not to throw oil where we don't want it.  The last use I remember was cutting access holes through 4x8 band beams on the outside of second floor joists, so we could vacuum out all the stinking mouse and insect nests, and sterilize the smell away out of the early 19th Century house.  That chainsaw is a bit of an odd tool to have, but nothing else is as fast.  I was surprised that it only took 2 chains to do that job with it running dry.  There were something like 34 of those holes to cut. 

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I have the 18v milwaukee and its a beast. I use it in the shop some but its more of a carpentry tool for me. Its has almost replaced my 120v saw even for heavyish use. I only bring out the 120 for framing all day. Ive used several different brands and i think the milwaukee is king. The older makita i used was like all the others, weak and didnt last long.

The 36v Makita looks interesting, never used it but ive seen a couple get returned at Depot, not sure why.

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