Can you share a Black Cherry furniture pic?


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I had a black cherry tree come down in the residential buffer zone at work. It's on the neighbors fence and he asked for us to cut it up. I obliged of course !

I've never worked this wood before and I can't find any pics on the interwebz that I can rely on that have a natural finish. I'd like to see what this stuff looks like if you have pics.

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There is a difference in those Shane..  This top is black walnut and the base is regular Western walnut..

3fwx.jpg

It's not the best picture but, I think you get the point..

As for the difference between Cherry and Black cherry, I don't honestly know..

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There is a difference in those Shane..  This top is black walnut and the base is regular Western walnut..

3fwx.jpg

It's not the best picture but, I think you get the point..

As for the difference between Cherry and Black cherry, I don't honestly know..

As far as I know the its all the same. Walnut, black walnut and all the other names people give it. Unless of course your referring to claro or peruvian.

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In the sw, black walnut and walnut are not the same.  English walnut is called walnut or claro walnut.  Black walnut is black walnut. 

I always thought people just gave walnut a bunch of different names for the same thing- Black walnut.

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24 minutes ago, Mike. said:

  If it grows it the St Louis region some people call it "grumpy cherry" 

 

By that token,  is a Phoenix cherry a "sweaty cherry" cali a "bro cherry" and sw Missouri would be an "uncle grandpa cherry"?

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As far as I know all domestic cherry is the same wood regardless of the commmon name used. 

And walnut & black walnut are  Juglans nigra and the same. English walnut & Claro walnut are specialty woods that are almost always labeled as such.

Not if she is faster than her cousins ......

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1 hour ago, wdwerker said:

As far as I know all domestic cherry is the same wood regardless of the commmon name used. 

And walnut & black walnut are  Juglans nigra and the same. English walnut & Claro walnut are specialty woods that are almost always labeled as such.

Wanted to +1 this part and ignore the rest.

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As a rule, stick to genus to id woods in a particular fashion. English walnut, peruvian walnut, american walnut, all different species but all called "walnut".

Don't be fooled by monikers "black walnut" "bastogne walnut" "claro walnut" "crotch walnut" blah blah. It could all be from the same tree, it depends on the figuring, not the species (not necessarily... ).

To my knowledge, "black cherry" and "Cherry" are the same genus, and the same thing. The closest comparison I can think of is "swamp ash" and "northern ash". They are the same damn tree, but due to the location where they grow, they have some slightly different properties, but they do have a quite similar physical appearance.

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Black cherry is cherry, there is no difference.  It's just that people think they sound smarter if they add the "black" part.  What you have, John, is a cherry tree.

Same story with walnut.  People call walnut "black" walnut so it sounds cooler.  It's just walnut.  Out west there's a tiny geographical area where you can find claro walnut, and English walnut can be found where they were planted, but it is not a native species.  99.9% of the time, when you see a piece of walnut, it's just a piece of walnut, whether it's being called walnut or black walnut or chocolate salty walnut...it's just walnut.  If you see something labeled as claro or English or Turkish or something else, then that's what you have...otherwise it's just walnut.

I'll continue to disagree with Mike about the color differences in cherry from region to region.  The last pack of Pennsylvania cherry we got in was a sickly pale yellow color, while the Missouri cherry we have right now is a rich, deep salmon color.  I think a lot of it has to do with how long ago it was milled and how it was dried.

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Black cherry is cherry, there is no difference.  It's just that people think they sound smarter if they add the "black" part.  What you have, John, is a cherry tree.

Same story with walnut.  People call walnut "black" walnut so it sounds cooler.  It's just walnut.  Out west there's a tiny geographical area where you can find claro walnut, and English walnut can be found where they were planted, but it is not a native species.  99.9% of the time, when you see a piece of walnut, it's just a piece of walnut, whether it's being called walnut or black walnut or chocolate salty walnut...it's just walnut.  If you see something labeled as claro or English or Turkish or something else, then that's what you have...otherwise it's just walnut.

I'll continue to disagree with Mike about the color differences in cherry from region to region.  The last pack of Pennsylvania cherry we got in was a sickly pale yellow color, while the Missouri cherry we have right now is a rich, deep salmon color.  I think a lot of it has to do with how long ago it was milled and how it was dried.

Eric to the rescue ! This is what I always thought. Thanks for confirming

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1 minute ago, Mike. said:

in any species you can see huge color variations

 

Agreed, but I'm not so sure it's as geographical as you make it sound..."Pennsylvania cherry is redder."  Color can vary from mountain top to mountain top, or even tree to tree.  I'm not convinced yet that there's any universal rule about geographical differences in color.  Like I said, the last batch of Penn cherry that came in was nasty yellow...explain that one...

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8 hours ago, Eric. said:

Agreed, but I'm not so sure it's as geographical as you make it sound..."Pennsylvania cherry is redder."  Color can vary from mountain top to mountain top, or even tree to tree.  I'm not convinced yet that there's any universal rule about geographical differences in color.  Like I said, the last batch of Penn cherry that came in was nasty yellow...explain that one...

Weather and growing conditions are quite different, and do produce differences in trees. I think its fair to categorize them regionally, but it may not be universally accurate. The cherry I have right now is almost padauk red from michigan. I dont buy my wood in mississippi, so i cant say if they are "less red" lol. Northern woods are typically more dense, and that could account for color differences.

 

 

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7 hours ago, davewyo said:

http://revimgs.bevnet.com/media/drbrowns/drbrown-blackcherry.jpg

Made from "natural" black cherry.;)

 

Completely different animal. Where black cherry means something is in dietary marketing. Lumber cherry trees and edible cherry trees are vastly different. 

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