davewyo

Cabriole Thing

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4 hours ago, davewyo said:

I'm not very efficient with my shop time. I don't really get much done on a day to day basis. If I'm working on a procedure that I have a clear idea of what I'm doing I might spend 4 to 6 hours of productive work, but most of the time I spend an hour or three and much of that is goofing off.

You took the words right out of my month.  This is pretty much my M.O.

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You might want to invest in a good glass cutter. The one i have compared to the guy in the glass shop nearby is like comparing a 1977 pinto to a 2017 porsche. His cuts, mine scrapes!

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+1 to @Janello, you get what you pay for, invest in a good one and be done with it. also use a good straightedge that you can ride the shoulder of the cutter on and score only once, tape the straightedge in place if you have to, especially on long cuts.

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Hopefully I can get away with calling this, making good use of a topic and not hijacking it. I have a very old piece of glass (probably rom the 30's) that is in a door ( don't know how to tell if it's tempered or not?). It is opaque with one side smooth and the other textured. Is this somethng I could attempt to cut myself or leave it to the experts?

on second thought, if anyone has an answer, please pm me so it doesn't turn into a hj. Thanks

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29 minutes ago, K Cooper said:

Hopefully I can get away with calling this, making good use of a topic and not hijacking it. I have a very old piece of glass (probably rom the 30's) that is in a door ( don't know how to tell if it's tempered or not?). It is opaque with one side smooth and the other textured. Is this somethng I could attempt to cut myself or leave it to the experts?

on second thought, if anyone has an answer, please pm me so it doesn't turn into a hj. Thanks

No worries Coop. I would be interested in the answer too. It's not really off topic if we're learning something. :)

 

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If the glass is in a commercial office door it's probably tempered. Most tempered glass has a little label etched into the glass in one corner. If it's in a cabinet door or has no label it might not be tempered. But trying to cut tempered will result in little shards.

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This project is amazing!  I'm just seeing it now, and the workmanship is beautiful.  Have you figured out what you want to do with the mirror/glass so it lives up to the rest of the project? 

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11 minutes ago, Anna S said:

This project is amazing!  I'm just seeing it now, and the workmanship is beautiful.  Have you figured out what you want to do with the mirror/glass so it lives up to the rest of the project? 

Thanks Anna! My next step is to cut two rabbets into the back of the door frames. A smaller one for the glass and a slightly larger one for the backer board. I got a really thin mirror glass (1.5 mm, so about 1/16th inch). The doors are small(4"x10") so I want to keep them light. I have some 1/8" hardboard for the backer but I'm going to try to make them out of solid wood. I'm planning to secure them with two brass screws(top and bottom center) with sloppy slots so that the wood can move. If the solid backer boards bow significantly I'll go to the hardboard. I'll probably put a piece of card stock between the glass and the backer board as a sort of a squeeze block, so if things shift with seasonal movement the glass maybe won't crack.

During the finishing stages; after I get the doors complete, fitted, and the hinges installed I'm thinking of gilding the profiled edges of the doors with gold leaf. I got the stuff I need, but I'm not 100% sure if mirror with gilding alongside will look good on the Thing. I'll try it out on my test door before I commit.

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You could veneer the hardboard. Technically you should veneer both sides but the size is so small it should be ok. Or you could just lay up 3 layers of veneer, put the grain of center one at 90 degrees to the faces.

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22 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

You could veneer the hardboard. Technically you should veneer both sides but the size is so small it should be ok. Or you could just lay up 3 layers of veneer, put the grain of center one at 90 degrees to the faces.

That's another great idea, Steve!

I could make my own little sheet of "ply-wood" for the backer boards. I like that!

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At that size you could apply pressure with a few concrete blocks. I'm having fun following your project. Couldn't resist the temptation to encourage another layer of detail !

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I squeeze my mirrors with newspapers, folded as needed for thickness. That will also date my piece, in case someone takes it apart LOL

I use 1/8" white MDF for my backing boards, it's somehow more rigid than hardboard, and can also be veneered.

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How does the mirror look in the openings?  Just wondering, because the pieces looks so traditional and I wonder if the mirror will be awfully bright.  There are a bunch of ways to age/distress mirrors on youtube if you wanted the finish to look a little older.  

I love the idea of the newspaper to date the piece.  I imagine this will be a well loved cabinet for many years

 

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I see you made two steps, one for the mirror and the other one for the backing panel! Now that's dedication! I always make just one deep enough for both (plus the support trim depth if I'm gonna use that), ~1/8" wider than then mirror, then fill the gap with silicone and install the backing panel on top.

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6 hours ago, Immortan D said:

I see you made two steps, one for the mirror and the other one for the backing panel!

Yeah I want the glass to be easily replaceable so I need the lip for the backer panel to screw into.

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2 minutes ago, davewyo said:

Yeah I want the glass to be easily replaceable so I need the lip for the backer panel to screw into.

That is a great idea, I am going to have to remember that one.

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2 hours ago, davewyo said:

Yeah I want the glass to be easily replaceable so I need the lip for the backer panel to screw into.

It's a great method. I use trim attached to the frame with tiny almost headless nails. That also allows for mirror replacement, but the trim usually has to be replaced too. Besides your method is invaluable for frames thinner than 3/4"! I love It! 

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I am sure you would have rather used the Brusso's but there is nothing wrong with the way that came out.  I would be happy if it were me... but its not. 

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7 minutes ago, Immortan D said:

Those invisible hinges have a nicer face than the ones I'm about to use. Are them SOSS hinges? 

Yeah these are SOSS 100CUS4. I think they're the smallest they make. The larger ones look slightly different.

9 minutes ago, Chet K said:

I am sure you would have rather used the Brusso's but there is nothing wrong with the way that came out.  I would be happy if it were me... but its not. 

My biggest problem is that with the knife hinges I was going to use I would have ended up with a 1/16th" gap/reveal on three sides of each door. With these hinges the gap will only be on the top and bottom of the doors.

Also, there's going to be a lot of tweaking to do on the hinges pictured because they didn't go in perfectly. I'm going to have to plane the front of the door to make it flush with the case, and I'm definitely going to have to put in some powerful magnets to get the doors to close firmly.

And that first set of hinges was the easier of the two. I can see already that I got my holes poorly aligned on this next one. I might have to do some creative shimming and patching to get the second hinges in.

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