A Few Pic of My Shop to Share


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Hello Friends,

I thought I might take a few pictures of my shop and share them with everyone. These are four from different angles to give you a basic view. I've never posted pics before so we'll see how they look. I'll post a few more every day If you would like to see some more details. I also took a few pics of the current project I'm working on and I'll share them with everyone later this week. Hope you enjoy.

Dave

Hello friends,

I had promised some more photos of my shop and have been remiss so here are a few more. I'm going to start at my miter saw station and work around clockwise.

10. I built the miter station off of good old Norms patterns and it has served me well. I have a Festool miter saw on order so the dewalt will be replaced in a few weeks.

11. My radial arm is mostly used for cross cutting very long boards and dadoes in stock less than 12" wide. Now that I'm using routers more and getting the Kapex I think both my 12" saws will hit craigs list soon. The router fixture under the saw is from woodworkers supply and is their version of the mulitrouter, it works great but now that I have a domino I think it's on the way to the list as well.

11.5 This is my Jess em router table. I has the dial on the table top for exact calibration of the bit and the side mounted hand crank to raise and lower the bit.

12. My BOSS sanders' table was just a tad too small for alot of the sanding I was doing so I made a base for it and enlarged the top. It's so much easier now to support work.

13. These are my Jet 16/32 and PC belt/disk sanders. I tried to keep all my sanding tools on the one wall so they were all together and I wouldn't have to walk back and forth a lot.

14. Here you can see my 735 Delta planer and a couple of clamps. I have my PM 15" planer right next to it. I rough plane with the 15 and keep the 735 set to the final thickness I want and run everything thru that last. I keep sharp blades in it and it does a great job. The 4" PVC pipe that takes care of my DC runs along the wall of the shop and under the floor to the outside Grizzly DC. Very quiet this way. I can chat at a normal voice with it on.

14.5 Here is a shot of my 8" PM jointer. I bought the heliax cutter head version and it cuts super smooth and is quieter as well. I have a 15" PM Planer with the Heliax cutter head as well.

I hope you enjoy these new shots and I'll post some more tomorrow.

Dave

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Dave,

I'm sitting here with so much shop envy I'm turning green.

Those are some of the most beautiful pictures I've seen in a long time.

If I may make one suggestion; Get rid of that Radial Arm saw. With a shop that beautiful ... those things are just plain dangerous. I have a close friend who works for Sears. He told me Craftsman stopped making them due to the volume of lawsuits associated them. With today's sliding compound miters, they are pretty obsolete anyway.

Also, if you ever get tired of that PM 8" jointer, I'd be happy to come over and take it off your hands. It looks like it may be in the way anyhow.... Okay, can't blame a guy for trying.

Seriously, your shop is ridiculously awesome!

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Dave,

I'm sitting here with so much shop envy I'm turning green.

Those are some of the most beautiful pictures I've seen in a long time.

If I may make one suggestion; Get rid of that Radial Arm saw. With a shop that beautiful ... those things are just plain dangerous. I have a close friend who works for Sears. He told me Craftsman stopped making them due to the volume of lawsuits associated them. With today's sliding compound miters, they are pretty obsolete anyway.

Also, if you ever get tired of that PM 8" jointer, I'd be happy to come over and take it off your hands. It looks like it may be in the way anyhow.... Okay, can't blame a guy for trying.

Seriously, your shop is ridiculously awesome!

I was thinking about your advice on the RAS and I agree, it's hitting Craigs list tomorrow. Now I have a hole in my shop with nothing to fill it. I need your help in coming up with an idea of what to fill it with. Come on bro don't let me down, what can I put there?

Dave

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I was thinking about your advice on the RAS and I agree, it's hitting Craigs list tomorrow. Now I have a hole in my shop with nothing to fill it. I need your help in coming up with an idea of what to fill it with. Come on bro don't let me down, what can I put there?

Dave

I hear the festool sliding compound miter is nice... hint hint....

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Dave,

Groovy shop! I love the natural wood everywhere. The shop looks like it's on a raised slab but I see dust collection going into the floor. Is the main trunk the dust collection incorporated into the slab? Is the dust collection in an outside addition?

On 'showing off the shop'....I live in an older brick home that has a detached, 2 car garage (21x27) with a 7 foot ceiling that is 'my shop'. I basically have an extra wall to hang things on like clamps. Though, I love this hobby, my 'shop' has been mostly storage with a few paths. Because of all of the shop picts like yours and tours of the shops on Woodwhisperer site, I am motivated and am on a 'throwing away spree'. I WILL have a neat, usable shop. When it's presentable, I will show before and after picts. Thank you Dave and all the rest of you (Marc too!!!)for the help.

Tim

ps...I also have a radial arm saw. Never had any problems but I am curious too

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Awesome shop! I'd like to hear some of the construction details as well - how the ducting for the DC is done and also how you determined the electrical layout. I'll also be interested to hear how much improved your DC is with the new Kapex. I'm assuming you'll hook it up the same way as the Dewalt was and not hook directly to the Festool vac?

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Dave,

Groovy shop! I love the natural wood everywhere. The shop looks like it's on a raised slab but I see dust collection going into the floor. Is the main trunk the dust collection incorporated into the slab? Is the dust collection in an outside addition?

On 'showing off the shop'....I live in an older brick home that has a detached, 2 car garage (21x27) with a 7 foot ceiling that is 'my shop'. I basically have an extra wall to hang things on like clamps. Though, I love this hobby, my 'shop' has been mostly storage with a few paths. Because of all of the shop picts like yours and tours of the shops on Woodwhisperer site, I am motivated and am on a 'throwing away spree'. I WILL have a neat, usable shop. When it's presentable, I will show before and after picts. Thank you Dave and all the rest of you (Marc too!!!)for the help.

Tim

p.s....I also have a radial arm saw. Never had any problems but I am curious too

Hey Tim,

My property had a steep angle where I built the shop so I hauled in a couple of feet of fill to level things out. My slab is raised in the front of the shop and level with existing ground in the back. When I was digging the footings for the foundation I ran the 4" ducting to the tools in the center of the shop like my table saws and jointer as well as a couple of locations around the shop underground then up thru the slab. The dust collector is in a separate room of the shop but not detached. The pipes from the underground also come up thru the slab and into this room. I ran copper grounding wire thru the pipe and into grounding rods under the slab to help prevent any static electricity from getting to the collector and causing a problem. After I poured the slab I shot down 2x4's on 24" centers on the floor and cut 1 1/2" foam board to fit between them for filler, then I screwed down 3/4" plywood flooring and covered it with epoxy floor paint. It's warm, comfortable and easy on the feet and the dropped tools. Plus it's wood...gotta have wood.

Anyone who has any questions about anything at all please feel free to ask. Please show your shop to us as well. It might not be as big as some but any place you can work wood is a wonderful place to be. Any and all shops can be an inspiration so don't hold back. Get excited about your hobby and help us keep excited too.

Dave

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Awesome shop! I'd like to hear some of the construction details as well - how the ducting for the DC is done and also how you determined the electrical layout. I'll also be interested to hear how much improved your DC is with the new Kapex. I'm assuming you'll hook it up the same way as the Dewalt was and not hook directly to the Festool vac?

Cheers,

I can't wait to try the Kapex as well. When I ran the electrical I wanted no problems with power so I made sure to run all homeruns to my 220 volt machines. I put lots of plugs and both low and high locations but most importantly put any and all of your lighting on circuits for just that. You don't want to be using a power tool that trips a breaker and your lights go out too because they were on the same breaker. Very, very dangerous. I'll include some photos tomorrow night of a post I framed near my 3 tall tools. I wired inside the post and I have a flip switch for an independent DC that just goes to my bandsaw. I have plenty of power since I have a 200 amp service to it. Any more questions please feel free to ask.

Dave

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Dave,

Sounds like you put a lot of thought into everything. I like it! My old shop had lower ceilings and block walls, so all my outlets were on the ceiling. I am currently planning a new shop and would love to be able to run electrical and DC connections under the floor but not sure that will be in the cards. Having a bunch of cords and DC piping to trip over not exactly my idea of fun. Will look forward to seeing pictures of the post you mention - sounds like it's a good solution.

I've been eying the Kapex for awhile now, but truth be told I'm pretty happy with my Bosch 4410. It's precise and accurate and has served me well. It's a bit big and heavy and the DC isn't that great, but I can't justify replacing it at this point.

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Hello Friends,

I thought I might take a few pictures of my shop and share them with everyone. These are four from different angles to give you a basic view. I've never posted pics before so we'll see how they look. I'll post a few more every day If you would like to see some more details. I also took a few pics of the current project I'm working on and I'll share them with everyone later this week. Hope you enjoy.

Dave

Wow, awesome shop Dave! Thanks for sharing.

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Hey guys, I just wanted to add a few more photos this week of my shop.

20, 21. These are shots of what I call "the post" in the shop. I have three tools here and I chose them because they either have no dust collection at all or don't need much. My large Delta bandsaw has its own small collector hooked up to it that has a switch all to itself on the post at the same height as the switches on the saw. Makes it easy to turn both on and off without bending over too much. All the wiring runs down the center of the post to access my machines. I plan on adding a PM 14" bandsaw to the group next year.

22. This is both my small Jet lathe and the doorway into the rest of the shop.

23. This is my sharpening station. I have my Tormek wheel here as well as all my Shapton and King stones. The cabinet holds all my various jigs and holders for every type of tool you could imagine. I'm like most I guess and keep trying sharpening devices until you get the method that works. I finally settled on the Veritas II jig. It works so well and with the cambered roller it's easy to sharpen you plane blades.

24. More shots of the sharpening room. I have many of my most used screws hanging on the wall here for fast access yet tucked out of the way from the main shop.

25. This is just a left over shelf/cabinet from an old project I use as a catch all for finishing supplies that haven't made it back to the finishing room yet as well as other items not in use at the moment but will be soon.

I hope you enjoy my newest shots and if you have any questions feel free to ask.

Dave

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  • 2 weeks later...

I showed my wife the pics of your shop and told I was going to build one as big as yours. She said I should ask you if I can just move into yours? lol.

Lol, I'm real easy. Can you please verify if she is a good cook? Woodworking is a taxing hobby and if she doesn't mind whipping up some biscuits and gravy every now and then I don't see why not. You could give me a hand with these large sheets of plywood too. Hehe

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Very impressive,thanks for sharing your shop with us. Looks like you spent a lot of time designing your layout.

You mentioned your finishing room, could you post some picts. of that?

I promise to get the photos of the rest of my shop posted this week and I'll include my finishing room. It is a separate area from the shop for health and safety reasons but it's about 24' x 12' and it fits the bill for what I need it to do which is allow me to apply my finishes without worrying about dust or slowing down my work on another project while the finish cures on the first one. Thanks for your kind words.

Dave

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  • 4 weeks later...

Well I'm sorry to say I've had a bit of a setback here. I got back from the Atlanta Woodworking Show with a truckload of new toys for my shop, I was off the rest of the week due to Mardi Gras, I was looking forward to setting things up and testing some new stuff out, basically I was pumped. Wednesday morning just before dawn, a storm blew threw that spawned a few tornadoes very close to me and I guess it was a little too much for one piece of the metal ridge cap on my workshop. Maybe it was weakened from Katrina who knows but it gave way and let a deluge of water into my shop. The main torrent struck my new assembly table, yes the one i just finished, dead center and warped the top piece of hardboard pretty bad. I didn't head out to the shop that morning because it was till raining pretty bad so by that evening when I did make it out there it was pretty bad. Luckily all I had on the bench were some of my Starrett squares and a couple of Lie-Nielsen Planes and chisels and a few pieces of the mahogany Morris chair I'm building....NOT!!!

Took the hardboard top off and it looks like the torsion box didn't get very wet so that's a big plus. Soaked up all the water, fixed the roof, cleaned the rust off my tools, trying to dry the chair parts so they don't get water marks and now I have to start putting all the tools that I piled and pushed around to clear the wet area back where they go, yay.

Now that I have ranted a bit I have to say if water had to come in someplace it was probably best there. If it would have poured into my two tablesaws in the middle of the shop or my joiner or planer it would have been much worse and I couldn't have fixed it in a couple of days. Rusted tablesaw tops are a pain to clean not including water in a Sawstop mechanism. With that in mind I should follow the advice of a very wise man who once said to try to find the good in every situation and contentment in whatever you do.

What a miracle. I'm really a lucky guy. Truthfully I was blessed by having it leak in the one place that would hurt me the least. Thanks guys for giving me a small place to vent.

Dave

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Can't but admire your spirit, Dave.

...With that in mind I should follow the advice of a very wise man who once said to try to find the good in every situation and contentment in whatever you do.

What a miracle. I'm really a lucky guy. Truthfully I was blessed by having it leak in the one place that would hurt me the least. Thanks guys for giving me a small place to vent.

Dave

A very wise man indeed. Fortunately the damage was limited to property, not people. With your attitude to life I'm sure you'll soon be back building beautiful things in wood for us to see...

All the best,

John

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After I poured the slab I shot down 2x4's on 24" centers on the floor and cut 1 1/2" foam board to fit between them for filler, then I screwed down 3/4" plywood flooring and covered it with epoxy floor paint. It's warm, comfortable and easy on the feet and the dropped tools.

Dave,

I love your shop and since I'm in the process building my own shop I'm wondering if you could answer a couple of questions for me? Right now I'm having my electrical work inspected next week so I still have a good ways to go now is the time to ask.

You mentioned covering your floor with epoxy. Everything I've read is it's really hard stuff so I'm wondering if it really easier on the body versus a concrete floor? I plan on putting in 3/4" plywood down with the foam insulation same as you but i never thought about putting epoxy over it. Now that you've used it for a while now, would you still do the same if you had to do it over again?

I had planned on putting my 2x4s on 16" centers figuring anything further apart would allow the floor to sag with some of the heavy equipment. Does yours have any sags or dips where your heaviest items are?

Also, I had planned on installing plywood flooring and using drywall on the walls; painted white to reflect as much light as possible. How do you feel about the lighting now that you have darker walls and ceilings?

Even though your shop is opposite of what I had in mind, dark walls and white floor versus white walls and dark floors, it seems practical enough and looks great enough that I plan on researching how much more pine will cost versus drywall.

Maybe I'll post some beginning photos to show the process of getting a new shop...

thanks in advance for answering my questions if you get a chance. Funny how just a few photos completely changed my direction on this shop...lol.

Dave

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Dave,

I love your shop and since I'm in the process building my own shop I'm wondering if you could answer a couple of questions for me? Right now I'm having my electrical work inspected next week so I still have a good ways to go now is the time to ask.

You mentioned covering your floor with epoxy. Everything I've read is it's really hard stuff so I'm wondering if it really easier on the body versus a concrete floor? I plan on putting in 3/4" plywood down with the foam insulation same as you but i never thought about putting epoxy over it. Now that you've used it for a while now, would you still do the same if you had to do it over again?

I had planned on putting my 2x4s on 16" centers figuring anything further apart would allow the floor to sag with some of the heavy equipment. Does yours have any sags or dips where your heaviest items are?

Also, I had planned on installing plywood flooring and using drywall on the walls; painted white to reflect as much light as possible. How do you feel about the lighting now that you have darker walls and ceilings?

Even though your shop is opposite of what I had in mind, dark walls and white floor versus white walls and dark floors, it seems practical enough and looks great enough that I plan on researching how much more pine will cost versus drywall.

Maybe I'll post some beginning photos to show the process of getting a new shop...

thanks in advance for answering my questions if you get a chance. Funny how just a few photos completely changed my direction on this shop...lol.

Dave

Hey Dave,

Thanks for the kind words and I hope I can be some help to you on your journey.

First, I love the epoxy paint. It's hard but durable. It doesn't make the floor any harder to stand on by any means and it's NOWHERE as hard as concrete.

Second, if I had to do it all again I would put the 2x4's on 16" centers as you suggest. It doesn't affect many of my tools but it does the large and small bandsaws and my drill press. I had to put another piece of 3/4 plywood under each to get a good no rock situation. I used T&G plywood and I would have used regular 3/4" if I had to do it again. I screwed it down but I can't pull a sheet up to run wiring to a new machine because of the T&G. I recommend screwing it down for sure and you can pull pieces up later.

Third, this is my third shop. My first had wood floors and sheetrock walls painted white. My second had concrete floors and sheetrock walls painted white. I will never have sheetrock walls again. I love the warmth of wood and the feeling of being in a woodworking shop. The shops of old that built masterpieces probably weren't sheetrock and white right? Now please, I'm not saying anybody who uses sheetrock is wrong by any means, it's just not for me this time around. In my opinion, unless you are performing surgery you don't need all that white and light. My shop has all the light I need and I have no problem seeing anything. Remember, I'm 52 and I wear glasses for reading and yet I have tons of light. I can also hang anything anywhere and if I hit a wall with a 2x6 or a sheet of plywood you don't even notice. I drill holes and use dowels glued in to hang things and it's pretty nice. If I want to move it I flush saw it off and sand it down and you don't even have a nail hole. My floor is grey and is the paint they use on garage floors. It doesn't show dirt very much and it is light but not reflective.

I would love to see some photos of your shop! Please post them and I'm sure everyone else would love to see some as well.

Dave

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Second, if I had to do it all again I would put the 2x4's on 16" centers as you suggest. It doesn't affect many of my tools but it does the large and small bandsaws and my drill press. I had to put another piece of 3/4 plywood under each to get a good no rock situation. I used T&G plywood and I would have used regular 3/4" if I had to do it again. I screwed it down but I can't pull a sheet up to run wiring to a new machine because of the T&G. I recommend screwing it down for sure and you can pull pieces up later.

Dave, thanks for answering my questions. I'll try and get some pics of the pre-shop this weekend. Your recommendation of using regular 3/4" plywood, is this actual plywood like you used on your floors in the past or the pine sheets without the tongue and groove? I've put in plenty of 110/220 outlets so hopefully there will be little need to remove the walls but screwing the panels down is a good idea. Now that I'm thinking of it, I planned to screw down my floors so I can run wire to the center of the shop for the TS etc. Did you screw the floor down and did you use T&G on the floor? I would prefer to use T&G on the floors to ensure the edges stay even but if I ever decide to move the power going under the floor, I couldn't do it. So I haven't decided yet on that one... lol. Hmm, this changes everything too if I use the epoxy like you did. Much to ponder over. Have you had to get to under your floors yet and run into problems?

Dave

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Dave, thanks for answering my questions. I'll try and get some pics of the pre-shop this weekend. Your recommendation of using regular 3/4" plywood, is this actual plywood like you used on your floors in the past or the pine sheets without the tongue and groove? I've put in plenty of 110/220 outlets so hopefully there will be little need to remove the walls but screwing the panels down is a good idea. Now that I'm thinking of it, I planned to screw down my floors so I can run wire to the center of the shop for the TS etc. Did you screw the floor down and did you use T&G on the floor? I would prefer to use T&G on the floors to ensure the edges stay even but if I ever decide to move the power going under the floor, I couldn't do it. So I haven't decided yet on that one... lol. Hmm, this changes everything too if I use the epoxy like you did. Much to ponder over. Have you had to get to under your floors yet and run into problems?

Dave

Hey Dave,

I might have given you the impression I screwed my walls but I had actually said or meant to say my floors.

I did use T&G 3/4 ply on the floor and I screwed it down. I might not use T&G again because it prevents you from pulling up just 1 panel to work below it but it does keep the edges even. I have had to unscrew sections of the floor to add my second TS and my jointer. I might plan a chase thru the middle of the shop that isn't T&G to make easy access if I ever do it again. My wife tells me this is my last shop but I think I might be able to squeeze in an addition to this one in a few years hehe. My walls are 1x6 v-grooved clear pine which I bought in 12' lengths. They are very light in color and reflect light well. I love them and would do it again in a heart beat. I can't wait to see some pics of your shop.

I promised to post some photos of my lumber storage, sharpening area and finish room but I haven't had the chance. I'll try to get some up tomorrow.

Dave

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