Small Media Cabinet in Soul-Patch Asian


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She's a beauty Eric.  That bubinga and cherry blend is perfect.  I am lovin' the clean lines and hidden hardware along with the hint of Asian influence; subtle and obvious at the same time.  I know you've mentioned your preferences before but, what was your finishing protocol for the top if I may ask?

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43 minutes ago, Mike. said:

It comes from white guys with soul patch "beards" who sip tea from sake cups and decorate their mom's basement with samurai swords and black leather sofas.  

you mean the furniture this guy's going to make when he grows up?  (yes, those are 20s)

1929793_28122696224_2272_n.jpg

 

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Lol the term is hilarious now that you painted such a vivid picture. Decorate their mother's basement with katanas--so funny and so true.

 

Im not wild about the style either, but the craft and attention to detail is certainly there. I will be publicly stoned to death for this, but this is a case of too much figured wood. When everything is curly, i go into visual overload and it loses it's impact, personally. That top though...wow-wa-wee-wa! I only used bubinga once to make a bathroom vanity top, and it blew me away when i applied finish. This top looks AWESOME.

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2 hours ago, gee-dub said:

She's a beauty Eric.  That bubinga and cherry blend is perfect.  I am lovin' the clean lines and hidden hardware along with the hint of Asian influence; subtle and obvious at the same time.  I know you've mentioned your preferences before but, what was your finishing protocol for the top if I may ask?

My "schedule" (-Trip, RIP) is this...

ARS, satin, four coats.

1st coat full strength

sand 320

2nd coat full strength

sand 600

3rd coat thinned about 3:1 mineral spirits

sand 600

4th coat thinned about 1:1 mineral spirits

allow to cure

polish with 1000 or 2000 grit Platin pad, lubricated with 1:1 mix of mineral oil:mineral spirits...I do this by hand with the grain, not with ROS

wipe dry

48 minutes ago, Mike. said:

I don't think there is too much figured wood.  He used relatively tame, straight grain on the rails and stiles.  Most of the figure is in the top and panels, as it should be  But too each his own.

This would have been my response as well.

To be honest, the only "figured" wood I used was for the door panels...and it was very light figure.  I used quarter sawn stock for the rails and stiles so there is some ray fleck visible.  That's incidental.  The legs and the rest of the cherry for the case is just plain Jane cherry...what figure you see is just natural chatoyance.  And the bubinga isn't really figured either, it just has insane grain.  That's not figured, necessarily.

Also, the camera picks up every bit of reflected light from every bit of weird grain...so it looks much crazier in the pics than it does in person.  It's pretty tame when you stand in my bedroom and view it.

But like Mike said, to each his own.  I definitely didn't go out of my way to use the most visually stimulating wood for every part of the piece...quite the contrary to be honest...I prefer simple usually.  If you wanna see overdone figure, I can show you that...those boards are reserved for other projects. ;)

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On 11/7/2016 at 0:40 PM, Eric. said:

Soul-Patch Asian just means that generic phony-baloney "Asian-inspired" look.  Genuine Asian furniture design is specific...what guys like me do is add a few curves or tapers in certain ways to give something an Americanized Asian feel and we call it Asian...but it's not.  It's sweet and sour chicken.

You mean you didn't build this in the sashimono tradition?? :o:lol:

Lovely piece of furniture!

 

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21 hours ago, Eric. said:

My "schedule" (-Trip, RIP) is this...

Thanks Eric.  That finish has the look that draws me in.  Let's the material show through and makes you want to walk up and put your hand on it.  A great example of how a little more effort at the finishing stage really ups the appearance of a piece.

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3 hours ago, gee-dub said:

Thanks Eric.  That finish has the look that draws me in.  Let's the material show through and makes you want to walk up and put your hand on it.  A great example of how a little more effort at the finishing stage really ups the appearance of a piece.

Thanks GD.  I agree...nothing turns me off worse than a shiny, plasticky looking finish.  It ruins the look and feel of wood.  I'll never understand why a person would take the time to work with nice lumber then slather on glossy polyurethane in a thick film.

2 hours ago, Immortan D said:

Did you use a kit to install those hinges? Or did you build your own jig? I have some of those hinges in stock waiting to be used, I wonder if I have to buy a kit or improvise something.

No kit, just a simple shop-made jig.  Basically just a board with two stop-blocks glued to it, and you clamp it on the workpiece.  Takes a little time to get it dialed in, but auto-pilot after that.

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On 11/7/2016 at 7:46 AM, Eric. said:

My "schedule" (-Trip, RIP) is this...

ARS, satin, four coats.

1st coat full strength

sand 320

2nd coat full strength

sand 600

3rd coat thinned about 3:1 mineral spirits

sand 600

4th coat thinned about 1:1 mineral spirits

allow to cure

polish with 1000 or 2000 grit Platin pad, lubricated with 1:1 mix of mineral oil:mineral spirits...I do this by hand with the grain, not with ROS

wipe dry

 

Eric, with your 320 and 600 sanctions between coats,  are you sanding by hand or machine?

If hand, sanding pad? sponge? 

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Beautiful work Eric. I think the choices of wood, and the design details are just right for a piece of furniture in a normal persons home. Theres enough there to make it visually interesting, but its still palatable and easy on the eyes. No excessive figure making you dizzy, no harsh contrasts or bold details punching you in the face.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

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Clean design that should look good in a wide variety of settings ! Consider that such a well made piece will easily outlast your lifetime it will get moved around. The open space could be used to display something long after the need for accessible electronic components. 

Love that bubinga top !

Does bubinga darken over time ? I can picture the cherry getting darker with time and I think the combonation will still look great.

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16 hours ago, Brendon_t said:

Eric, with your 320 and 600 sanctions between coats,  are you sanding by hand or machine?

If hand, sanding pad? sponge? 

The sanding I do by hand with a folded piece of sandpaper.  Nothing fancy, just a light touch.  I'm only knocking down the dust nibs and creating a smooth surface for the next coat...it's less "sanding" than it is "smoothing."

8 hours ago, wdwerker said:

Does bubinga darken over time ?

Not really, not that I've noticed anyway.  I have a few bubinga pieces and the color seems to stay fairly consistent as the years go by.  The cherry will darken but there will always be a color contrast between the two species, and also a contrast of grain and texture.  I picked the species based on what I expect them to look like down the road...it was my intention to go for a more subtle complement than a stark contrast, which I'm kind of moving away from these days.  With exceptions.

Thanks for the compliments, guys.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On ‎11‎/‎7‎/‎2016 at 10:46 AM, Eric. said:

My "schedule" (-Trip, RIP) is this...

ARS, satin, four coats.

1st coat full strength

sand 320

2nd coat full strength

sand 600

3rd coat thinned about 3:1 mineral spirits

sand 600

4th coat thinned about 1:1 mineral spirits

allow to cure

polish with 1000 or 2000 grit Platin pad, lubricated with 1:1 mix of mineral oil:mineral spirits...I do this by hand with the grain, not with ROS

wipe dry

 

Eric, this is really helpful - when I first saw this, I copied it into a notebook for future reference...  and now the future is here!

I just finished my 4th coat of ARS tonight - everything's gone great, I love the finish.  Above, when you say "allow to cure" - does that mean 30 days like they say on the GF website?

 

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31 minutes ago, -MattK- said:

 

Eric, this is really helpful - when I first saw this, I copied it into a notebook for future reference...  and now the future is here!

I just finished my 4th coat of ARS tonight - everything's gone great, I love the finish.  Above, when you say "allow to cure" - does that mean 30 days like they say on the GF website?

 

I've "polished" as soon as 24 hours after the final coat, but the longer you can wait, the better.  I'd say you're perfectly safe after two or three days under normal conditions...wait a week if you're a really patient man.

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