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Chris H

Winter is Coming!

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Any HVAC experts out there that can help me understand best heating options for a WI winter in a new shop?

We have propane on the property and there is no cost to run an extra line to the shop (they eat that cost assuming they'll make it up in additional tonnage).  In addition the shop has full 200 Amp electrical service with room in the panel for whatever is needed (assuming 240 power).

Building has ~R16 insulation (R13 Fiberglass + R3 Radiant Barrier).  I am not looking to keep it house temperatures.  Looking to keep it around 40 degerees to avoid freezing finishes and the like.  I'd probably knock it up to high 50s low 60s to work in.  I typically get 3-4 nights a week about 2-3 hours each of shop time.  What is the most economical way to heat that space?

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I have one of these.  Mine is natural gas.  I have a 3 car garage.  It can take my garage from 0-70 in less than an hour (I have never timed it, it might be as short as 20 minutes to get the garage heated).  I keep it at 55 all winter (even when I am not working) and it actually does not need to run all that much, even if the doors opening and closing.  I will kick it up to 70 and then turn it off when I am applying finish.  I keep it at 55 when I am working.   I don't notice a meaningful difference difference in my heating bill.  I am in northern illinois, so my climate is very similar to yours.   

https://www.appliancedepot.com/cayenne-series-75-000-btu-low-profile-natural-gas-garage-space-heater-fsan-75

If I were building from scratch; however, I would do in floor radiant heat.  

 

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Location hour north of Mpls MN...I have forced air heat and air in my current shop which I set to 50 when not in the shop and like 65ish when I am out there. I also have radiant floor heat in my attached garage and basement it is awesome way to heat a space except...I keep my attached garage at 52 degrees to bring that up to 65 would take an hour or better in my shop the forced air takes about 10 min...given the fact that a lot of times I only have an hour i went the forced air route...just food for thought.

On another note in my previous shop I used a unit like Mike posted above worked great but make sure if you go that route you are cognizant of where you keep things if you turn it down to low. My unit was placed directly above my glue/finish cabinet and I turned it down to like 40ish things froze that were inside the enclosed cabinet. Simple solutions to this, in my case I just left it at 50 which seemed to work fine but other options would be locations or simply opening doors.

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10 hours ago, Mike. said:

Too damn hot.  I can work in 20F.  I can't work in 90F. 

You can always add layers....you can only take so many off before the cops show up.

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16 hours ago, pkinneb said:

Location hour north of Mpls MN...I have forced air heat and air in my current shop which I set to 50 when not in the shop and like 65ish when I am out there. I also have radiant floor heat in my attached garage and basement it is awesome way to heat a space except...I keep my attached garage at 52 degrees to bring that up to 65 would take an hour or better in my shop the forced air takes about 10 min...given the fact that a lot of times I only have an hour i went the forced air route...just food for thought.

 

If I had in floor heat, I would just keep it at 55-60 whether I am in the shop or not.  It is pretty efficient, no?  I am most comfortable working in cooler temperatures.   I do like being able to quickly get my shop up to 70 (for finishing) or even 80 (if I want a waterbase finish to dry quickly, for example).  

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6 hours ago, Mike. said:

If I had in floor heat, I would just keep it at 55-60 whether I am in the shop or not.  It is pretty efficient, no?  I am most comfortable working in cooler temperatures.   I do like being able to quickly get my shop up to 70 (for finishing) or even 80 (if I want a waterbase finish to dry quickly, for example).  

I would agree it is more efficient than forced air from a cost perspective 

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Too damn hot.  I can work in 20F.  I can't work in 90F. 

Woodwork naked! Just remember your steel toes, in case you drop a chisel...

... and keep any loose, dangly items away from the lathe.

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With prices as they are, vented gas heaters are your best bang for the buck. I would take a hard look at the ceiling insulation and trying to add more. Bonus points if you can get a wifi thermostat and turn it up from your phone before you even step foot in the shop.

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CoolMax tee shirts and plenty of fans are the only way I manage to work in our summer heat.

Polyester/cotton blend wicks sweat away from your skin,fan evaporates it to cool you.

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With prices as they are, vented gas heaters are your best bang for the buck. I would take a hard look at the ceiling insulation and trying to add more. Bonus points if you can get a wifi thermostat and turn it up from your phone before you even step foot in the shop.

Wifi is already installed IMG_1517.thumb.JPG.4ac1d43dab38b2f8800a1

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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WInter is coming!?!  Winter is here . . . I had to wear a long sleeve shirt earlier this week and had a thermal on in the shop at about 5am this morning.

winter clothes.JPG

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