Nyles

Forrest Woodworker II

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Greetings,

I was hoping to get some insight/thoughts opinions on a purchase i plan to make soon.

I am eyeballing a Forrest Woodworker II thin kerf blade for my tablesaw.  It's a craftsman 10" cabinet saw, pry about 10 years old.  Don't know the motor size off hand but i am going to say its on the smaller side so was looking at the thin kerf blades.

I noticed there appears to be a 2 different woodworker II options, a 10" 40 tooth flat grind and a 10" 48 tooth blade.  I am looking for suggestions on which one I should pick up.

This would be my go to blade for ripping and cross cuts on the table saw.  My workflow is to rip to width on the table saw and then to generally cut to rough length on my compound miter saw then make all my final cross cuts on my table saw sled.

Most stock i work with is 4/4 domestics and i don't see my self working with 8/8 very often for the type of projects i usually under take. I do occasionally use plywood for projects so I'd like to find something that works for that as well.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated as far as which one of these fine blades i should lean towards.... i am personally leaning towards the 48 tooth?

Currently I am using a Freud Diablo blade, i don't recall the tooth count but its a combo blade so this would be a definite upgrade for me.

thank you!

 

http://www.woodcraft.com/product/151314/forrest-woodworker-ii-saw-blade-10-x-48-tooth-thin-kerf.aspx

http://www.woodcraft.com/product/153696/forrest-ww10401100-woodworker-ii-10-40t-1-grind-thin-kerf.aspx

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I use the Freud industrial series, and they are great.  I use a dedicated 24 tooth Rip blade, which leaves a flat surface (important for splines, grooves, dados, etc).

I also Keep a 50 tooth blade for running a mitre sled.  All my finish crosscut in solid wood are usually done on the kapex.

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I've never heard anything too bad about Forrest blades except resharpening. They're pretty addicted to TENRYU at work and do a very good job. I would look at cost and sharpening versus use to make the decision.

We actually just switched sharpeners to FASTENAL  as the have a CNC sharpener...

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I have a bunch of forrest blades, their recommendations are actually correct on what a blade will do.

In the long run, especially if you are a professional they are the cheapest way to go and still get amazing results. (Find a local sharpener you can trust to sharpen and retooth for fast turn around and it should be slightly cheaper)

Flat tooth- only really want to use it for box joints and bottomed cuts like that.

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Thanks for the feedback guys! 

 

Eric,

I saw that blade as well but its not a thin kerf? 

also i dont for see working any exotic materials in the near future and again i rarely do anything thicker than 4/4 stock.

I almost always back my work piece when cutting with something sacrificial when i am worried about any tear out on my cross cuts.

would you suggest forgoing the thin kerf and getting the 40T woodworker II or getting the 48T woodworker II thin kerf?  i didnt see a 40T thin kerf on the woodcraft site.  Will 8 teeth really make that much of a difference on my rips? im always mindfull of my feeding speed when making rips on my table saw.

i know ideally I would be better suited to get 2 blades but i have 3 kids and a very tight budget and its xmas time, so i am trying to find something nicer then what i have that will give me a happy medium/dual purpose for the time being.  Ideally for my birthday in a few months ill pick up a ripping blade and have both...

thanks again for all the feedback!

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Nyles said:

Thanks for the feedback guys! 

 

Eric,

I saw that blade as well but its not a thin kerf? 

 

 

 

Oh sorry, I missed that part.  He's a thin kerf...

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/415861/Forrest-WW2-5-38-40T-564K.aspx?gclid=CjwKEAiAmo_CBRC9qbGQssjqi28SJABYTgZxjngYVD5ofOrIP0zt9S1_Mk_C3FdeWaMyRykD3TyiGBoCp5fw_wcB

415861.jpg?rand=381208175

The two combo blades I use are a 40T Forrest and a 50T Freud Industrial.  I don't notice much difference between the two in regard to crosscutting, but the 40T definitely rips easier and it's not because it's a Forrest.  Yes the extra 8 teeth will make a difference, and as long as you're doing more rips than crosscuts at the table saw (which is likely), I'd err on the side of fewer teeth rather than more teeth.

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3 hours ago, Keggers said:

I agree with Eric. Forrest blades are all I use. They have a great product.

Same here. Dont own any other brand anymore.

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11 hours ago, Mike. said:

The forrest 40t blade is nice, but I recently installed it after having it re-sharpened by forrest and it is leaving swirls on my cuts.

hey Mike, any idea on whats causing the swirl? i'm about to send my woodworker2 in for sharpening as i don't trust anyone around here to do the job.

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I've been a fan of Ridge Carbide blades, I think [don't know for sure] that they are equal in quality to Forrest or Freud. 

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When you are looking at this price point your choices really open up.  I had never been very impressed with the WWII but, many folks who's opinion I respect praise it so maybe it was just me.  You have read here that a "one size fits all" blade used for ripping and crosscutting is a compromise for both functions and this is true.  Still, I have a general purpose blade and use it quite a bit for . . . well . . . general purpose cuts.

I also have dedicated rip and crosscut blades and others in my arsenal but, you are looking for a general purpose, thin kerf blade of good quality.  At a range of $75 to $125, the choice is yours.  I have migrated to Carbide Processors and eventually all my Lietz, Freud, Forrest, Amana, etc. got replaced with these as they reached the end of their useful life.

For whatever reason, CP's price on TK blades is higher than their price for full kerf cutters so they may not be a good fit for you. I moved to Carbide Processors for the level of service they provide.  They are also just two states up from me on the left coast.  However, Infinity, Tenryu and others mentioned are all pretty much top notch cutters.  This will not be the last blade you ever buy so, don't get caught in analysis-to-paralysis.  You've made the choice to move to quality cutters; do your research, make your choice and enjoy.

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Best blades I have are the forrest woodworker II and Tenyu.   When new they cut well but the Tenyu blades seem to stay sharp way longer to me. A friend with a cabinet shop likes the amana blades and I think I will give them a try also.

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What is the downside to having the flat top teeth every so often?  I need a couple blades and was thinking of getting a Freud glue line rip and a fairly high tooth count general purpose with the flat tooth every so often.  Seems like it would be handy for doing joinery without having to swap blades unless I wanted to do some heavy ripping. 

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i don't see a downside to a ATB-R blade, i have a Freud with the flat raker and also a couple of Forrest Woodworker2 blades that are just ATB blades, my next one will be a Forrest Woodworker 2 with a flat raker for joinery work to replace the Freud.

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 The first blade I got from carbide processors was a 50 tooth ATB-R with a flat raker. The teeth were ground so that the raker left a truly flat bottomed kerf. I use this for small splines and other special joinery.

Based on the quality and longevity of that blade I eventually replaced all my cutters, as they aged out, with carbide processor blades.  I will say that the CP blades run noticeably longer between sharpening than those I have used in the past.  This may have to do with their cermet II tips. Again, as stated, once you move into this arena of quality your choices open up.

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I have two standard WWII and an option 1 WWII. The later is special grind that gives a flat bottom cut, crosscut almost as well as the standard WWII and rips much better than the standard WWII. It is my main blade - I really like it and recommend it. I routinely rip 8/4 stock with it without problems and don't have to change blades for the rest of my work.

I also have dedicated rip blades, and a special Forrest Hi-AT blade for plywood and melamine sheet goods.

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2 hours ago, Robby W said:

I have two standard WWII and an option 1 WWII. The later is special grind that gives a flat bottom cut, crosscut almost as well as the standard WWII and rips much better than the standard WWII. It is my main blade - I really like it and recommend it. I routinely rip 8/4 stock with it without problems and don't have to change blades for the rest of my work.

I also have dedicated rip blades, and a special Forrest Hi-AT blade for plywood and melamine sheet goods.

Ive got all of those too as well as the Dado King, but so far the flat grind WWII has only been for finger joints. Never thought about using it for ripping and was planning on picking up a WWII 30T or something similar for rough/quick ripping.

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Hi, Ben - the WWII option 1 blade isn't a true flat bring. Most of the teeth have some angle grind on them. If you look at the teeth, it looks weird, but it works well. My standard WWII blades don't get used much. The option 1 blade is my go to blade and lives on the saw unless I need a speciality blade. The rip difference alone makes the minor difference in crosscut worth it. If you have an option 1 blade, five it a try for day-to-day use. I think you will like it.

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5 minutes ago, Robby W said:

Hi, Ben - the WWII option 1 blade isn't a true flat bring. Most of the teeth have some angle grind on them. If you look at the teeth, it looks weird, but it works well. My standard WWII blades don't get used much. The option 1 blade is my go to blade and lives on the saw unless I need a speciality blade. The rip difference alone makes the minor difference in crosscut worth it. If you have an option 1 blade, five it a try for day-to-day use. I think you will like it.

I do have one and will give it a try! Thanks!

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The Forrest is a good blade, but it's about the most expensive option in a general purpose blade (which is a compromise by design).  Similar money spent on decent dedicated blades will yield better results. If it's got to be a WWII, get the 48T...it'll be better at fine cuts, crosscuts, and ply than the 40T.  Then look to add a $30 Diablo or Irwin Marples 24T ripper.  

Both the Infinity Super General and Freud Premier Fusion will achieve similar results as the WWII 48T for less money.  I used to love my WWII 40T...then I starting trying a lot of other blades, and found many them to be comparable or better for less money....especially the 60T and 80T crosscut blades.  The WWII is still a good blade, but it's not worth the premium for what it is IMO.

 

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On 12/9/2016 at 2:37 PM, knotscott said:

The Forrest is a good blade, but it's about the most expensive option in a general purpose blade (which is a compromise by design).  Similar money spent on decent dedicated blades will yield better results. If it's got to be a WWII, get the 48T...it'll be better at fine cuts, crosscuts, and ply than the 40T.  Then look to add a $30 Diablo or Irwin Marples 24T ripper.  

Both the Infinity Super General and Freud Premier Fusion will achieve similar results as the WWII 48T for less money.  I used to love my WWII 40T...then I starting trying a lot of other blades, and found many them to be comparable or better for less money....especially the 60T and 80T crosscut blades.  The WWII is still a good blade, but it's not worth the premium for what it is IMO.

 

Dont know anything about them, but how many times can they be sharpened before they need replacing?

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27 minutes ago, ben_r_ said:

Dont know anything about them, but how many times can they be sharpened before they need replacing?

The more salient issue is how big are the carbide bits since different people will wait different times to sharpen a blade.  The Super General and Premier Fusion have similar sized bits to the WWII.  Some of the more commercial oriented blades will have even more carbide but they also move up in price.  

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