Questions on block plane and bench planes


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Are these two items different?

Yea they are different. I'm drastically over simplifying it, but a block plane is small and can be held with one hand. A bench plan is larger, and designed to be used with two hands, it has a tote (handle) in the back and a knob in the front.

What is the difference between low angle and high angle? Different applications?

Again I'm simplifying, but a low angle plane is good for end grain as it lowers cutting force, why a high angle is good for long/edge grain.

What is the Number mean on bench planes?

In "most" (note the quotes) cases it signifies size, #1 being the smallest, #8 being the largest.

What is a good all around bench plane and / or block plane?

Bench: #5

block: #60-1/2

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  • 3 weeks later...

Here's a video by Lie-Nielsen's Deneb Puchalski that will answer some of your questions. While your on LN's YouTube channel, check out the Large Format Block Planes video and sharpening videos.

Joe

Great video! I'm primarily a power tool guy but I am thinking about hand tools a lot lately (quieter, less dust, works well in small shops,etc).

Thanks for the link.

-Jim

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Great video! I'm primarily a power tool guy but I am thinking about hand tools a lot lately (quieter, less dust, works well in small shops,etc).

Thanks for the link.

-Jim

Jim,

If you can get your hands on a copy of Fine Woodworking's Tools & Shops, annual issue, winter 2007/2008, No. 195, there is an article on page 72 which is titled "Handplanes I Can't Live Without" by Garrett Hack. In this article Garrett goes through what he considers to be the 8 most important handplanes, what he uses them for, and why they are indispensible.

It's a pretty good article. He goes so far as to tell you which plane he owns. All of his are classic beauties. But he also mentions which contemporary versions are available new. If you can find the article it is a really good summary of handplanes, sizes, uses, etc...

I hope this helps.

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Jim,

If you can get your hands on a copy of Fine Woodworking's Tools & Shops, annual issue, winter 2007/2008, No. 195, there is an article on page 72 which is titled "Handplanes I Can't Live Without" by Garrett Hack. In this article Garrett goes through what he considers to be the 8 most important handplanes, what he uses them for, and why they are indispensible.

It's a pretty good article. He goes so far as to tell you which plane he owns. All of his are classic beauties. But he also mentions which contemporary versions are available new. If you can find the article it is a really good summary of handplanes, sizes, uses, etc...

I hope this helps.

Thanks for that heads up. I actually have that issue (I used the plan in there to make my router table) I may have glanced through the article before but I wasn't really that interested in the planes when that issue came out. I have some reading to do now :)

-Jim

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I would second the 60 1/2 plane(Lie-Nielson). Bought one at WIA and am in love with it. I am even getting my dad converted to some hand tools in the shop. Now, sharpening is still a black art and I am getting there. Great with chisels, still need to get better with the irons.

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