hawkeyestoob

The 10,000th hand plane question ;)

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I have searched but am not finding exactly what I I am looking for. 

I have a couple of hand planes that were my grandfathers that I would like to restore to daily users. The first is a corrugated bottom Stanley 5 1/2. The second is a Bailey 3. These both seem to be relatively popular and good candidates for restoration. Does anyone have any tip or tricks for restoring either of these? Also who is the best source for replacement parts for these? From what I understand it is typically worthwhile to spend the money for new modern steel blades on these. Is there anything else that you would recommend replacing?

Thanks for your help.

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I've bought Hock blades for some of my old Stanley planes and they are fantastic. Huge upgrade from the original blade.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

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The Paul Sellers video above is a good one, as is @Lester Burnham's advice about trying the existing blades.  My rehabbed Stanley #4 with what appears to be an era appropriate blade works great.

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If you are on FaceBook, look for "hand plane building, restoring and collecting." The guys in that group have the best feel for where to source parts that I have encountered. They also often link to some pages of guys that do rehab work "blogs" that can be helpful. 

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@Lester Burnham Thanks for the link and those look great! 

@Dknapp34 I have read that the Hock blades typically hold a much better edge that 99% of the stock blades. I will check them out.

3 hours ago, sjk said:

 

The Paul Sellers video above is a good one

 

I will be sure to take a look at his video as well.

@C Shaffer I had not thought to check on FB. I will have to take a look there! 

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I'd see how you like the original blades before spending a bunch of money on new ones.  If nothing else it'll be some good sharpening practice before you get something expensive to screw up!  There isn't really anything else to replace other than the tote and knob if yours are damaged. 

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First thing you have to do with an old blade, is try flattening the back side (near the cutting edge, you don't need to flatten the entire blade). If you get a nice, even, polished surface near the cutting edge, then you can proceed to sharpen and use that blade. If not, do not waste your time, get a replacement blade.

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I have refurbed a few of my grandfathers old Stanleys. I used EvapoRust to clean them up. Works fantastic. I also put a Hock blade in one of his block planes. No complaints on the blade.

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3 minutes ago, Tom King said:

Like an old carpenter told me once: "sharp solves all sorts of problems."   which is especially true with old planes.

Thanks for the good advice there!

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On 2/14/2017 at 5:37 AM, C Shaffer said:

If you are on FaceBook, look for "hand plane building, restoring and collecting." The guys in that group have the best feel for where to source parts that I have encountered. They also often link to some pages of guys that do rehab work "blogs" that can be helpful. 

You are 100% correct on them being very helpful. They are helping me with my difficulties as I type this now!

Well crap. I apparently have a broken frog and perhaps some mismatched parts.

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1 hour ago, hawkeyestoob said:

That's almost where I am at with it. If it wasn't my grandfathers then the decision wold be made but sentimental value is keeping me hopeful that I can pick up the needed parts reasonably. The thought of using the same plane that my grandfather and great grandfather both used seems pretty cool to me. 

I have a transition plane given to me by a great uncle. It has so many problems that all it does is take it's deserved place in my shop.  I have 2 daily users from my grandfather.  Only you can decide if the time and effort are worth it.

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My grandpa's #6 lost it's lateral adjuster and tote horn at some point in its 100 year lifetime (probably dropped and landed on them).  I repaired the horn (optional but easy) and didn't bother with the lateral. 

The 5 1/2 is going to be used similarly to a 6, as a fore plane for rougher work.  If you camber the blade you won't miss the adjuster because you won't need it.  You can adjust with a brass mallet.

If it was a smoother you'd have issues, but it'll work just fine as a heavy jack, fore, or scrub plane.    The knob might be harder to repair. 

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