collinb

Dado comparison

Recommended Posts

If you have a small and under powered saw I would get the 208.  If your saw is fine power wise I would get the 508.  I am like mat60 I have and am very happy with the 508 because of the bigger chippers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have both.  I use the 208 for ply and MDF and the 508 for hardwoods.  I do not use ply for visible parts so you should factor that in.  If I used hardwood veneered ply the higher tooth count of the 508 would probably be desirable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 508 is notably cleaner.  If budget is steering you toward the 208, the DW/Delta 7670 is cleaner than the 208 for not much more money...kind of in between the 208 and 508....plus it has a great carrying case and better shims.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's another vote for the Dewalt.  It's the only tool I have, out of many thousands, that I use the case it came with.  The chart in the case for dado width is dead on.   Sometime later, get a set of magnetic shims.  You don't need a large set of magnetic shims.  One will hold another that's not magnetic that comes in the Dewalt kit.

I marked with a Sharpie on the cutters which pieces to use with different thickness plywood, so there is no time wasted the next time I use that plywood.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Tom King said:

I marked with a Sharpie on the cutters which pieces to use with different thickness plywood, so there is no time wasted the next time I use that plywood.

Thats a really good idea Tom.  Thanks for sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Got it.   The ones I have had in Wisconsin were bland, maybe I bought the wrong kind...

Definitely bought the wrong kind. If they don't "squeak" when you bite then, they're not fresh enough. They should be tangy when plain, and there are all sorts of flavored types.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They were squeaky, just bland.  Not much cheese flavor.  

My taste in cheese runs more toward 5 year cheddars, blue, camambert or strong gruyere.  Wisconsin curds are poplar by comparison.  

 

Definitely different ends of the cheese spectrum. Curds are the potato chip of cheeses.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are much better cheese curds out there than bland.

Not going to get blue cheese curds... (I really want those now)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Eric. said:

Collin, you have to tell me why you have a carved sweet potato as your avatar.  There's gotta be a story there.

That's a cheese curd.

16 hours ago, Mike. said:

I think it is a cheese curd, Collin is a huge fan of them.  I live close enough to the Wisconsin border that the novelty has worn off.  The seem flavorless and rubbery to me. 

That generally depends on the cheese factory one goes to.

I like Arena the best. Carr Valley is good but does get old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheese lovers might consider brick. It's a Wisconsin-invented variation on limburger. Smells not as strong yet maintains that nutty taste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, C Shaffer said:

@Mike. They are sold as salt curds where I come from. 

http://www.cubacheese.com/mobile/CHEESE-CURD/departments/37/

On Saturday wife & I were at a cheese store in Amish country (Shishler's, just s/w of Canton, OH) and the owner spoke that she gets her curds from NY as well. Because there is no cheddar made in Ohio.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, freedhardwoods said:

Getting back to dado blades, would there be an advantage or disadvantage to the sd510 over the sd508?

Only if you need really deep dados(?). The cutter speed is higher due to the greater diameter and maybe someone can speak to this from a physics point of view.

I use an 8" because the Greene and Greene stuff I make benefits from the "reach".  If a 6" would do the job for me I would go with that.  I don't use a lot of sheet goods so maybe one of our pros could speak to dado diameter pluses and minuses for shallow cuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If anybody is looking to buy a dado stack, my 8" Dadonator set is still for sale. Check out marketplace. (Sorry for the advert).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/24/2017 at 3:41 AM, freedhardwoods said:

Getting back to dado blades, would there be an advantage or disadvantage to the sd510 over the sd508?

Not enough to justify the cost or the potential wear and tear on your saw.  A 10" dado stock would be a lot of mass to spin if you don't have a monster saw.  The upside is depth of cut, but that's not often an issue for a 6" stack, let alone an 8".  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Who's Online   1 Member, 0 Anonymous, 298 Guests (See full list)

  • Forum Statistics

    28906
    Total Topics
    390462
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    21829
    Total Members
    1529
    Most Online
    Nogglebaum
    Newest Member
    Nogglebaum
    Joined