Yodiebuzz

First Project

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So, I know my clamping situation sucks right now. I'm in the process of remedying that at lunch time.

 

 

I thought I would be ok with what I had for this small of a panel...Wrong.. looked at her this morning and somewhere along the line I got the pipe clamp too tight and put a hell of a cup in the panel. Hopefully I can save this without having my nice 3/4" top become 3/8" to be flat.

 

 

It occured to me, though, should I have just gotten each of these boards flat with on one face only and jointed the edges for glue up, and then surfaced the top to final thickness to help prevent what I'm facing now?

 

 

I think from here out, these end tables will be referred to as my "Live and Learn Tables"

 

 

I knew going into this that all the YouTube and books I could consume would never equal experience, but I didn't know I'd be finding that out right out the gate.

 

 

Also, A. Mahogany was a dumb choice for a first project. Dumb.

 

 

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20 minutes ago, Yodiebuzz said:

So, I know my clamping situation sucks right now. I'm in the process of remedying that at lunch time.

I thought I would be ok with what I had for this small of a panel...Wrong.. looked at her this morning and somewhere along the line I got the pipe clamp too tight and put a hell of a cup in the panel. Hopefully I can save this without having my nice 3/4" top become 3/8" to be flat.

I have one word for you: Cauls. I see you used one on the end, but more will be beneficial. Also, if you have to put that much pressure on the board, it's better to go back and flatten/joint the edges more.

Assuming you have a tablesaw, rip them back apart and re-glue... Any cup is likely to get worse with time rather than better.

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It occured to me, though, should I have just gotten each of these boards flat with on one face only and jointed the edges for glue up, and then surfaced the top to final thickness to help prevent what I'm facing now?

Probably. Even with alignment aids (dominos/biscuits) it's hard to get the boards perfectly flat. I usually get everything to the same thickness with my power planer, and then smooth out any miss alignment with the hand planes after the glue up.

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I think from here out, these end tables will be referred to as my "Live and Learn Tables"

I knew going into this that all the YouTube and books I could consume would never equal experience, but I didn't know I'd be finding that out right out the gate.

Every project is a "Live and Learn" project. Or at least it is for me. If you aren't learning, you aren't doing anything new.

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No pictures tonight. Frustrated to say the least. Cupping from my inadequate clamping was not AS bad as initial thoughts, still had to compromise and accept that my top will now be 5/8" instead of 3/4", still plenty thick enough, just frustrating that its out of my plan.

 

My comment to this A. Mahogany not being a good first choice is the tearout, man the tearout.

 

I will be going with cherry most likely next project after these tables are complete.

 

I did get the panel flat and true on both faces, need to trim the ends flush and it's dome for now, ready to start the base.

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I will add that Sapele 1) tends to look nicer than African 2) Does not tear out as much and 3) is only marginally more expensive.  

 

 

Exactly the same price at my yard. Sapele is a superior species in every way IMO.

 

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I haven't used AM/khaya but I have used Sapele and can agree with the above about its 'workability' properties. The stuff I used was all quartersawn/ribbon stripe so it still had some tearout along the stripes but it was very shallow and minor

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I wish I could find Sapele near me, I don't have much in the way of hardwoods in my area, I'm in St Louis area often for work, keep forgetting to do any looking when I'm up there, may find some place nice.

 

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I wish I could find Sapele near me, I don't have much in the way of hardwoods in my area, I'm in St Louis area often for work, keep forgetting to do any looking when I'm up there, may find some place nice.

 

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I work at U-Pick Hardwoods in St. Peters most Saturdays and some Fridays. Pop in some time and I'll hook you up. We have plenty of sapele and lots of other good stuff.

 

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I work at U-Pick Hardwoods in St. Peters most Saturdays and some Fridays. Pop in some time and I'll hook you up. We have plenty of sapele and lots of other good stuff.

 

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Good to know, my boats come into the shipyards over in the Alton/Wood River area across the river. Looking at the map St Peters isn't too terribly far from there, I'm mainly only up M-F, not there much on weekends.

 

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Good to know, my boats come into the shipyards over in the Alton/Wood River area across the river. Looking at the map St Peters isn't too terribly far from there, I'm mainly only up M-F, not there much on weekends.

 

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It's worth the drive if you're after anything other than red oak which you can get anywhere. We have a big selection of both domestics and exotics of the highest quality. We also cater primarily to the hobbyist so it's a casual atmosphere.

 

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^What he said.  A couple days ago I made the mistake of trying the closer dealer.  That was a waste of time, they have a jacked up prices and a lousy selection.  I made the 35'ish minute drive up to see Eric like I should have done in the first place.  Trying to save time at the closer place just cost me time.

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OP, I agree with @BonPacific. Rip 'em back apart and clamp back together with less pressure use cauls on both top and bottom on both ends, unless you just really like thin table tops?

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I get zero tear out milling Khaya ! I use my drum sander. Sapele is superior. 

 

Would be a good option, except I'm on this journey hand tool only.

 

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OP, I agree with @BonPacific. Rip 'em back apart and clamp back together with less pressure use cauls on both top and bottom on both ends, unless you just really like thin table tops?

 

I may do that, the cup, though would still be present some and need more flattening, I'm down to 5/8" now, borderline for what I wanted anyway, this will probably get ripped up and used as joinery test pieces for the rest of the project as well as finish sampling, so, not a total waste, just a dissapoinent.

 

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I remember reading that now. Only thing I can recommend is razor sharp tools and possibly skewing your plane in those troubling areas.

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On 3/14/2017 at 11:57 AM, Yodiebuzz said:

So, I know my clamping situation sucks right now. I'm in the process of remedying that at lunch time.

If I can offer a little advise. I notice in your picture you have both large bar clamps on one face of your panel that clearly won the tug of war with the red pipe clamp. You should stagger one up, one down, and try for equal pressure and spacing . I usually clamp my two ends with medium pressure, and look at the joints. Have a mallet and scrap block near by to tap the boards flush if needed, Clamp the center lightly, then add more clamps- one up, one down with relatively even spacing across the whole panel.  

Trick is to clamp lightly and evenly until everything is just right., then torque them all up. Having all one style clamp helps to feel the torque is being applied even.

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Well, I guess I forgot about this journal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's been slow going die to work and life and such.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I do have the table assembled and shot with the first coat of laquer tonight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big jump I know, I never think about snapshots of my progress when I'm working.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For some reason the pictures make the top look skewed to the base, it's not.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Far from the quality of most of you guys/gals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's the best I can do with this particular project, I don't want to take away from the fact that my skills lack severely and I have a long journey ahead of me, but I still REALLY dislike this wood. If I wasn't so bullheaded I may have already given up. I would rather shutter my shop than use Khaya again. The gentleman that's been mentoring me gave me some cherry to play with for some shop projects, I'm liking working with that.

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Yeah, it looks great! I'm less proud of my first project than I would be of that. It's really nice.

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Some of the "mahogany's" we get our hands on can be very porous, fuzz badly and are generally cantankerous to get a decent surface on.  I think your table came out fine and you had a lot of enjoyment (come on, admit it) learning some things along the way. 

One trick for that material is to seal it with a light cut of shellac flooded on the surface and allowed to soak in.  This stiffens up the fibers and allows them to be scraped or sanded to a smoother surface.  This will also change your finishing approach so factor that in if you give it a go.

This frame is some pale African Mahogany.

5767df7726d6e_11-14-frame(15).jpg.0f45b09f2fd6a490997ad8de8e9db079.jpg574b0d4c5dc57_11-14-frame(24).jpg.a50f04df028b5385b1b6197f09aa61cc.jpg

The chatoyance is what made this stock interesting.

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Before you give up on the "second cousins", take a read here.  I will say though that after the khaya, the cherry will seem like you're working buttah'.

 

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