Tablesaw thought process...


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6c5745220c47d5c86a1454b4d88cf9c9.jpg

 

So going off the above picture ... my thought process is all over the place

 

First I would like 3hp because why not, if I'm going to get a nice tool might as well especially on something that will last a lifetime.

 

But then it gets tricky ... I know I don't need a 52" table it is just too big. I could fit it but doubt I will ever use it that much. Although it's kinda like you are spending all the money why not spend $250ish more or whatever.

 

Now 30-36" is there any extra benefit to the 6"? Is it worth the extra $150ish? What am I missing that they go 30-36-52 instead of something in the 40" range.

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Go 36". 30 realy can be a limiting factor in the kind of work I see discussed most here. 52" must be intended for cabinet shops that use mostly sheet stock. I can't imagine cross-cutting a board that long often enough to need a permanent support table. Of course, it CAN double as assembly space.

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Go 36" at 3hp. Thats what I just got and finished setting up. Super nice and I know I will never want for more power. The 36 is also much better rails and fence system compared to the 30"

 

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None of the images above appear to be of the industrial model It has the cabinet door on the right hand side. The industrial is a whole lot easier to use a sled with, in particular you have an extra 5 inches prior to the blade if my memory serves me, as the table is much larger than the professional or the contractor. From my experience I would get the industrial with a 52 inch fence. You can also get the mobile base which is hydraulic lift and returns the saw to its own legs when lowered. Buy once, cry once. Go and look at the range before buying.

 

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2 hours ago, ben_r_ said:

36" 3HP is my vote too. Add the ICS mobile base and the over arm dust collector and youre set. Thats the route I went and havent regretted it yet.

This is what I got & would choose the same again. The ICS is very nice & what Dave said is true, but it sure is a lot more money.

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Thanks for all the input, it really helps! 

I am not sure I am getting the sawstop, but I just like to go look at them and dream haha. However they had the best lineup where I could take a picture and get all the examples out there.

So it seems to be 36 or 52" are the clear winners. Another reason 52" may be a little rough, even though I have the room in my garage would be if bad weather comes my wife would put her car in there which would mean moving the tabelsaw. I am building the rest of the shop to where not much else would need to be moved. 

After I get my shop built with all the cabinets and tables and stuff, I am not sure when the 52" would actually come in handy to have? Minus the 1 off project for someone else maybe? I can see too much hobbyist wood working needing that much room.

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19 minutes ago, knotscott said:

The T-Glide fence is well worth the extra cost over their supposed "Premium" fence.  If you're not sure about going with 52", you can always get the 36" and slide the front rail over by one bolt hole to gain about 10" extra rip capacity for free....~46"  

 

wow that is awesome! Is this common? I have never seen or heard of this before ... 

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2 hours ago, bushwacked said:

wow that is awesome! Is this common? I have never seen or heard of this before ... 

It's common for me, and I've seen it discussed on quite a few other sites.  I did it to my GI 50-185, Craftsman 22124, and now my Shop Fox W1677.  It makes the most sense on a left tilt saw because you'll almost never need the left side capacity, and is pretty easy to do with an early Biese style fence, which the T-Glide is.  You'll basically be robbing from the left side and giving to the right side.  Attach the front bracket normally, but slide the front fence tube over by one bolt hole...you'll attach one less bolt, but should still have 3 or 4 to hold it.  If the back rides on the rear rail, you'll need to arrange to slide that proportionately, but if it rides on the table, you'll need to fill the gap with a router table or extension of some sort for the fence to slide on.  You'll need re-locate or replace the measuring tape for the new "zero" reference. 

 

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Sawstop tops do not have any adjustment screws under the main bolts and rely heavily on the front and rear rails to give you a flat surface. If you move the front rail along (not sure if the holes will line up any more) then you will need to give some though as to how you will maintain a flat surface, particularly if you intend moving the saw on a mobile base. I am still of the opinion that the 52 inch rail is the best option. That time when you need it stops you in your tracks and it is then that you question your decision to buy the shorter rails.

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I just bought a PCS 36" with the industrial base to replace my PM66 with 52" fence. I made this change to add some shop space because I never used the full width of the fence. The industrial base while expensive is an awesome add if mobility is a need. Regarding the fence it really comes down to work flow before I purchased my track saw I used the extra fence more. Now I break things down either with the track saw or with the miter saw and for me recovery of the space was worth it.

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1 hour ago, pkinneb said:

I just bought a PCS 36" with the industrial base to replace my PM66 with 52" fence. I made this change to add some shop space because I never used the full width of the fence. The industrial base while expensive is an awesome add if mobility is a need. Regarding the fence it really comes down to work flow before I purchased my track saw I used the extra fence more. Now I break things down either with the track saw or with the miter saw and for me recovery of the space was worth it.

I think the 36 table saw and track saw set up has a lot of value when shop space is a concern.  And Drew, didn't you just buy a track saw?

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I did the fence rail shift with my Rigid saw. It allows me to have a router table insert in addition to the right extension wing, rather than in place of it. If mine was a true T-square fence, I'd have about 42" of cut. But since it is a rear-clamp style, I max out at about 38".

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I don't make base cabinets or really use sheet material much at all.  I still use my 52" fence and would be loath to give it up.  Of course it could be like electric side mirrors on your car; until you had them you didn't know what you were missing.  Back to the subject at hand . . .

On a hybrid saw I had back awhile I found 30" too short much of the time.  I shifted the front tube of my Beisemeyer fence one set of holes to the right which gave me 40" of capacity.  I found this to be plenty of capacity much of the time.  When I bought my Saw Stop I went with the longer rails since the cost wasn't that much of a difference and you can cut them down to any length that makes more sense for your shop.

The right hand side of my saw is no-man's-land where DC ducting and electrical stuff runs past for many items in the shop.  The 52" rails really only shifted my saw to the left a few inches based on my layout.  Whether the longer rails fit into your space or not is only something you can decide but, 30" rip capacity and that "premium" fence offering (versus the T-Glide) would not be on my short list.

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15 hours ago, davestanton said:

Sawstop tops do not have any adjustment screws under the main bolts and rely heavily on the front and rear rails to give you a flat surface. If you move the front rail along (not sure if the holes will line up any more) then you will need to give some though as to how you will maintain a flat surface, particularly if you intend moving the saw on a mobile base. I am still of the opinion that the 52 inch rail is the best option. That time when you need it stops you in your tracks and it is then that you question your decision to buy the shorter rails.

Dave - I thought that as well, but I think they are talking about keeping the bracket/rail as it is intended, keeping the left and right extension wings level, and ust sliding the square tube over (it attaches to the rail).

I have the 52" rails so I don't need the extra capacity (and couldn't even fit it - it's tight as is it), but I just checked it out and sure enough there is about 10" between the bolt holes, so sliding the square tube over should gain you about 10" more fence capacity to the right of the blade.

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8 hours ago, Jfitz said:

Dave - I thought that as well, but I think they are talking about keeping the bracket/rail as it is intended, keeping the left and right extension wings level, and ust sliding the square tube over (it attaches to the rail).

I have the 52" rails so I don't need the extra capacity (and couldn't even fit it - it's tight as is it), but I just checked it out and sure enough there is about 10" between the bolt holes, so sliding the square tube over should gain you about 10" more fence capacity to the right of the blade.

Well, in that situation I can see that would work. Funny how field dependent you can get.

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