Steve B Anderson

Caution with Purchased Furniture Plans

Recommended Posts

Just curious, do you have any gap at the top or in between the two drawers? In any case, double-checking published plans is always a good idea before you build. It's really easy to make an error when dimensioning a drawing, especially if you're trying to include gaps between finished parts.

I always lay out the dimensions full size on a piece of wood before cutting, even if I'm working from my own drawing.

Bob Lang

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bob, 

Yes, there are 1/16" gaps between the drawer faces. I think they just had a typo on the plan of 7 7/16 instead of 7 5/16. On the previous plan I built the slots in the rails and stretchers for the panels were going to interfere with the tenons. Not a huge problem but this was not shown in the plans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that it matters or changes anything but were both sets of plans from the same source.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I use plans as a way to get general dimensions and proportions, but never expect, nor need, them to be perfect.

Even if the plan is perfect, wood is an imperfect medium.  You could order 30% extra BF and still not have enough material to build a plan to perfect spec after cutting around defects and finding nice grain matches.  Often times the decision is "Should I Buy another board, or make this part 1/2" smaller and adjust everything else?".  It is just the nature of working with natural materials.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Mike. said:

I use plans as a way to get general dimensions and proportions, but never expect, nor need, them to be perfect.

Even if the plan is perfect, wood is an imperfect medium.  You could order 30% extra BF and still not have enough material to build a plan to perfect spec after cutting around defects and finding nice grain matches.  Often times the decision is "Should I Buy another board, or make this part 1/2" smaller and adjust everything else?".  It is just the nature of working with natural materials.

 

I'm using plans now to build my skill level. Hope to be in the self designing club before too long. I do plan on modifying this night stand design to closer match a table I have on the chalk board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW, this is not unique to woodworking. My Mom has taught quilting locally, and is pretty sure that the only way people who sell books of quilt plans can make an affordable product is to not take the time to proofread anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Doomwolf said:

is pretty sure that the only way people who sell books of quilt plans can make an affordable product is to not take the time to proofread anything.

Every author I've spoken with says that they painstakingly pour over every word numerous times. They get their friends and spouses to take a look too. And when the book is printed there are inevitably mistakes. You either miss something glaringly obvious, or it gets messed up at the printer's shop.  Careful footnotes and finicky details (like fractions) are particularly insidious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, davewyo said:

Every author I've spoken with says that they painstakingly pour over every word numerous times. They get their friends and spouses to take a look too. And when the book is printed there are inevitably mistakes. You either miss something glaringly obvious, or it gets messed up at the printer's shop.  Careful footnotes and finicky details (like fractions) are particularly insidious.

Yes, it does happen.  I have a small awards & engraving business and no matter how many triple checks of my double checks I do, mistakes still happen and have to be re-done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find nothing more disappointing than typos in books.  Taints the whole thing.  Makes me feel like the author has no credibility, even though it's probably not their fault sometimes.  That said, if I were ever to write and publish a book, I would personally make damn sure that every word in that thing is correct if I'm gonna put my name on it and expect people to pay money for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yep I'm with Mike.  I start with a rough sketch (and when I say sketch, I mean sketch...pencil and graph paper, baby) and figure out the overall dimensions, use the tape measure to cut the first few parts, then put the tape away (in a manner of speaking).  I never ever rely solely on numbers...which is the main reason I think the imperial vs. metric debate is so stupid.  I don't find numbers that important in my work.

 

This^

 

I dont build from other peoples plans, but if i did i would never just start cutting stuff to the listed dimensions. Especially not drawer fronts!

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I designed, drew and checked drawings for my entire career - structural plans for buildlings.  I don't think that I have ever seen a set fo drawings that were perfect.  Granted a building is more complex than a piece of furniture but.....you get the idea.  Yea, it's humans doing the drawings and the checking and the buillding.

I usualliy do a detailed drawing of my projects first but,,,,,,,,,,,,,

On 6/16/2017 at 5:32 PM, Eric. said:

Yep I'm with Mike.  I start with a rough sketch (and when I say sketch, I mean sketch...pencil and graph paper, baby) and figure out the overall dimensions, use the tape measure to cut the first few parts, then put the tape away (in a manner of speaking).  I never ever rely solely on numbers...

I should try a piece without doing a detailed drawing first... I might learn something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True story.

Back in 1970 or '71 I was a draftsman for a small firm and we got the job of detailing the structural steel for a large shopping mall in another city. We used the engineers drawings to detail each and every beam and column of a two story building with a mezzanine.

We had been working on these drawings for two or three months and sending our detailed drawings directly to the steel  fabricator who would ship the parts directly to the job site as they were finished.

I was detailing some of the last beams and columns at the mezzanine level when it suddenly occurred to me that there was no provision for a stairway or elevator to get to that floor! There wasn't even a way to get to the second floor from the first either!!

When I reported my findings to the boss, he called the engineer about the problem and they said........ "Yea, we just noticed that ourselves yesterday."

 

POO-POO OCCURS.  :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.