Mark J

Total Solar Eclipse

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, Chet said:

Well, right now here in Sunny California... it's foggy.  I Don't know if it will burn off in time to see anything.  I was going to use my telescope with it's sun filter.

Well it cleared up for us when it was at about 20%.  We had three of the four grand kids over, the oldest one had to start school last week so he missed out.   Everyone took turns with at the telescope.  I think the coolest part was watching the grand kids reactions.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/18/2017 at 9:40 PM, Eric. said:

I'll be digging into my reserve stash

That's a funny concept I've never considered. A reserve stash, would be the freshest from curing unlike spirits which are acclaimed on age.  I think the reserve stash should be that old nasty bag you only pull out when you're dry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Tom King said:

Did anyone see the shadow bands on the ground?   They will have been studied much more this time, than ever before.

 

Yes! I saw them just before and just after the totality. Super cool effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was to be 94% here but smoke from 90,000 acre wildfire to the southwest of us made it a disappointment.  Full sun before was a bright red orb but was still to bright to look at but not bright enough to get through the eclipse glasses well.  About half way through was bright enough to dimly see it through the glasses.  Oh well.

We are not currently threatened by fire here at main home but our beach place in Brookings Oregon is just outside the evacuation area and there is no containment yet. We check the fire maps a couple times a day - whatever happens, happens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Tom Crawford said:

 We check the fire maps a couple times a day - whatever happens, happens.

I've been there. It's not a good feeling.

Wish you all the best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Tom Crawford said:

Was to be 94% here but smoke from 90,000 acre wildfire to the southwest of us made it a disappointment.  Full sun before was a bright red orb but was still to bright to look at but not bright enough to get through the eclipse glasses well.  About half way through was bright enough to dimly see it through the glasses.  Oh well.

We are not currently threatened by fire here at main home but our beach place in Brookings Oregon is just outside the evacuation area and there is no containment yet. We check the fire maps a couple times a day - whatever happens, happens.

Tom, wish you and you family and neighbors the best! Stay safe. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, davewyo said:

Yes! I saw them just before and just after the totality. Super cool effect.

Glad someone noticed!  It's been my theory, since the 1970 eclipse, that they are evidence of gravity waves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Tom King said:

Glad someone noticed!  It's been my theory, since the 1970 eclipse, that they are evidence of gravity waves.

From seeing them I believe they are evidence of some kind of waves. I don't know if it's a temperature thing, or light skipping of atmospheric interference, or gravity, but there's something very interesting going on there.

Another thing I saw during totality (through a spotting scope) was jets of "plasma", or whatever it is, coming out from the corona like solar flares.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Tom King said:

Glad someone noticed!  It's been my theory, since the 1970 eclipse, that they are evidence of gravity waves.

Clipped...

"Still, scientists believe they understand what causes the phenomenon. As the moon covers the sun, the sunlight stops coming from a "firehose" and gradually looks more and more like it's coming from a single point. It acts that way as well.

As light moves through the atmosphere, its journey is sometimes bent by the density of the air. Wind and heat can increase or decrease the air's density, in swirling patterns. (We can see these patterns when, for example, we see sunlight passing through a hot area, like the air over a grill or a baking hot road.)

When light waves bend, they interfere with each other, a peak and a trough canceling out in darkness, or two peaks becoming brighter. The "firehose" sends a flood of light down so we don't see these patterns, but the point source allows us to see them clearly

A good way to test this idea out at home would be to light a candle, put it near a wall, and illuminate it with a flashlight. The heat from the candles will mess with the air density enough for the light from the flashlight to show up as swirls. The farther away you move the flashlight, making it more of a point source, the more clearly you should see the swirls.

But, when you do this, you won't see "shadow bands." You'll see a dot pattern, not a wavy pattern. Shadow bands aren't the result of a strict point source. The sun doesn't become a point until the final moment before the eclipse. When the sun is getting eclipsed, it becomes a thinner and thinner crescent — the same crescent that made the crescent shaped lights between the leaves in the picture in the last section. So rather than being the interference pattern of a bunch of dots, shadow bands are the result of the interference pattern of a bunch of crescents."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to check in late!

We had a 99.5% eclipse (no talking the spouse into traveling 30 miles to the center, so we took a chair ride to a mountain top.)

I have to agree that even .5% sunlight is a lot, and makes it all different.  No stars out, no diamond ring.

But the animals acted like it was dawn.  It got remarkably cooler and jackets went back on.  Colors and shadows were remarkable, and it was fun to watch the shadows form and disappear in the valleys on all sides (we had a 360 degree view.)  Don't know if it was "shadow bands" but there was a time when the shadows were indistinct.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/21/2017 at 4:57 AM, wtnhighlander said:

 

@pondhockey, ... I do accept that organisms are adaptable, and that adaptations can result from environmental influence, among other things. This is the basis of 'Natural Selection', to my understanding. The myriad of domesticated dog breeds is clear evidence of such. But until someone breeds dogs into something that is clearly no longer a dog, I can't accept the other. The argument that such action requires 'millions of years' just makes the theory un-testable, therefore un-provable...

 

Just a small clarification.  And admittedly, much of my learning was 30 years ago...

"Speciation" is what I think you may be referring to; it happens, for example, when subpopulations of a species no longer interbreed, and for a long enough (doesn't have to be millions of years) that the populations "go their own way" with different adaptations, until they become different species that typically are not capable of interbreeding.

A key to Darwinian natural selection is that traits are selected for (for example by enhanced propagation or survival); not simply "acquired" and passed along.

And yes, except for those with religious convictions, the scientists are pretty well settled on it (and see it as a practical problem with the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria.)

And I'm not aware of any influences by total eclipses.  It seems that the critters around us had specifically NOT adapted their behaviors appropriately to the eclipse - not sure what to say about the humans ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had 98% where I live in Clover, SC could've driven 60 miles to Columbia, SC but lack of knowledge and planning kept me from it.  It amazed me how much light was still present at 98% almost "dusky".  We did notice secadas and tree frogs singing, a few bird calls,  and a turkey gobbling which I think excited some dogs lol.  One other observation for me and my wife was at maximum - the light seemed muted with a golden greenish hue.  Not the sky that we noticed but the reflected light from our surroundings.  Seeing it at 98% has caused an item to be added to my bucket list.   "See a total solar eclipse in a 100% totality zone."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mother Nature is a much better breeder than humans. [emoji4]

The origin of life remains a mystery...but I think evolution as we understand it is pretty much settled.

There is zero fossil evidence of anything ever turning into something else and those that have claimed to have found them have turned out to be hoaxes. The jury is still out.

 

Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Eric. said:

 

But, when you do this, you won't see "shadow bands." You'll see a dot pattern, not a wavy pattern. Shadow bands aren't the result of a strict point source. The sun doesn't become a point until the final moment before the eclipse. When the sun is getting eclipsed, it becomes a thinner and thinner crescent — the same crescent that made the crescent shaped lights between the leaves in the picture in the last section. So rather than being the interference pattern of a bunch of dots, shadow bands are the result of the interference pattern of a bunch of crescents."

The shadow bands that race across the ground during a total eclipse, only do so for a short number of seconds just after first diamond ring, and just before the second, so it can be considered a point source (i guess more properly a slit,rather than a pin) a quarter of a million miles away.  There are Scientists doing the math to try to fit what's been measured to different theories.  Until the math answer matches any theory, it's all no more than theory.  I'm sticking with gravity waves.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/22/2017 at 0:43 PM, Tom King said:

... Until the math answer matches any theory, it's all no more than theory.  I'm sticking with gravity waves.

And you may as well!

In our lifetime, before spacecraft observed the far side of the moon, I stuck with the "blue cheese" theory.  I was ok giving it up, but not until it was proven wrong ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Who's Online   2 Members, 0 Anonymous, 155 Guests (See full list)

  • Forum Statistics

    28886
    Total Topics
    390217
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    21817
    Total Members
    1529
    Most Online
    Carl Lacorcia
    Newest Member
    Carl Lacorcia
    Joined