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DruBokkens

Tung oil over Teak oil

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Would it work to apply tung oil over teak oil? I'm wondering if it can pose problems like adhesion of two different oils to each other, unless it doesn't matter when both oils are curing oils, and tung will adhere to teak just as well as to itself?

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Personally I prefer to do a hand rubbed wax finish on top of my oil finishes using some Briwax but I've been debating on trying some Odies oil wax.

 

I'm not sure why you would do an oil on oil finish unless teak oil isn't going to give you that level of protection you are going for.34cd99ad8050b28570e0ce52b0b302a7.jpgaab3e0a503fc461b6dfe8a59e95ff4ca.jpg

 

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I'd be willing to bet the tung oil you used was "tung oil finish" from the box store, right?  Which means it's almost exactly like the "teak oil" you're using from the box store.  Neither of them are actually oils.  They're both oil/varnish mixes, with very little varnish.  If you want more protection you'll need to use something like a wipe-on poly.  Putting a weak finish on top of a weak finish is gonna give you...a weak finish.

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I'm aware of the difference and I use 100% raw pure tung oil, as well as teak oil. The reason these two instead of stronger modern blends is that it's for wooden training weapons. Long story short, it needs to achieve a flexible satin finish that provides very basic "protection", only to keep most of the sweat from being absorbed, and to minimize atmospheric exchange of water. Reason I asked if it's possible to put tung over teak without running into major issues is experimentation. Normally I use just pure tung, but doesn't penetrate dense hickory as well as teak (as far as I know), so I'm considering experimenting with teak underneath as a conditioner and tung on top for the tactile reasons.

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The teak oil has varnish in it.  If anything I would use the tung oil first since it offers even less protection than the teak oil.  Putting tung oil on top of a film, no matter how thin, would basically be a waste of tung oil since it would be almost entirely wiped off.

For deeper penetration you can either warm up the oil or dilute it with mineral spirits.

Honestly I would just use one or the other.  I don't see how you gain anything using both except the possibility of adherence issues...which I doubt, but still...no reason to complicate it for such little gain, if any.

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Yeah, I'll just stick with tung since I know it better. Does diluting really increase penetration? Because I've also heard it can be an impression while what you get is just less oil per coat, and only the solvent penetrates since the oil molecules stay the same size.

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Yes I believe diluting does penetrate deeper.  Whether or not it has any real-world benefit, I don't know.  You can also warm the oil.  You only need to do that for the first coat...after that it's pointless.

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@Denette recently posted a project where he applied BLO warmed to 130 degrees F to cherry, and achieved much better penetrstion, and an awesome look. I believe he referenced a book whose author had experimented to determine that 130* worked best.

Might be different for tung.

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12 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

@Denette recently posted a project where he applied BLO warmed to 130 degrees F to cherry, and achieved much better penetrstion, and an awesome look. I believe he referenced a book whose author had experimented to determine that 130* worked best.

Might be different for tung.

Thanks for the info. I'll try the same temp since tung and BLO should be close enough in behavior.

10 hours ago, Aj3 said:

Your wasting you time samurai .:P

What is this, another one of your attempts to sabotage my mission? ;)

1001_animations__jack_vs__aku_.jpg.a86aa6fa27276cf02be742c21c429bcf.jpg

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18 hours ago, DruBokkens said:

Long story short, it needs to achieve a flexible satin finish that provides very basic "protection", only to keep most of the sweat from being absorbed, and to minimize atmospheric exchange of water.

Hollow Earth Swordworks uses mineral oil with beeswax in it for their weapons. It will give you a flat finish so it won't shine like satin but it will repel sweat and water. It will also give them a little protection from nicks and scraps. 

EDIT: You could apply the tung oil first and once it dries apply the mineral oil/beeswax as an extra coating to protect them. (I don't work for Hollow Earth, I just own a couple of their "elvish" swords and talked with them about their finish for training weapons - stage fighting).

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I would, if not for the fact that wax requires constant reapplication. If I can improve penetration on the first coat of tung, it'll suffice until I can find a better way of doing it.

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On 7/5/2017 at 2:17 PM, thatCharlieDude said:

Hollow Earth Swordworks uses mineral oil with beeswax in it for their weapons. It will give you a flat finish so it won't shine like satin but it will repel sweat and water. It will also give them a little protection from nicks and scraps. 

EDIT: You could apply the tung oil first and once it dries apply the mineral oil/beeswax as an extra coating to protect them. (I don't work for Hollow Earth, I just own a couple of their "elvish" swords and talked with them about their finish for training weapons - stage fighting).

And since it's food safe, you can eat your disemboweled victims right off the sword.

That's the same finish I use for cutting boards. 

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By the way, warming the oil even mildly after the first coat makes no difference, correct? Binds with the previous coat just as well as with cool oil?

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By the way, warming the oil even mildly after the first coat makes no difference, correct? Binds with the previous coat just as well as with cool oil?

Never tried, but that certainly makes sense. I think warming just changes the viscocity a bit so the first coat soaks in better.

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Does oil temperature have any impact on the gloss level in the finish? I wonder if cold oil on consecutive coats would aid in producing more gloss while mildly warmed-up oil less gloss? I guess I'll just have to experiment with it.

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