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dial indicator digital and accessories

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Hey guys i need a dial indicator to check if my blade is square with my miter slot on my dewalt table saw and who knows what else i'll use it for. 

It's pretty overwhelming with all the price points and options. First is should i go with a digital one or a needle readout one? Next what accessories should I buy, I need something to go in the track and i'm not sure if I need the magnet arm one.. is there a kit or certain one you'd recommend? 

 

 

screen-grab- 2017-07-27 at 12.36.19 PM copy.jpg

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I have a couple of the dial type indicators and they work well.  Both of them came with the stand in your lower left picture.  I find the stand cumbersome and very rarely use it.  It's very easy to customize a jig for whatever you will be using it for.  The blade to miter slot parallel jig (saw gauge) in your pictures is nice but can be made out of scraps fairly quickly and accurately.

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I have analog indicators. Not sure why you would need a readout for checking machines and it is one less battery i need to concern myself with. Ultimately, you want jig(s) to hold the indicator in a vertical orientation(setting jointer/planer knives, checking planer settings--chipbreaker, pressure bar, infeed outfeed rollers) and you want to hold it horizontally to measure parallelism of your saw blade to miter slot and fence. I dont know of one jig that does it all. I personally own the A-Line-It as i purchased the PALS kit at the same time for my contractor saw. Later on i purchased the Oneway for jointer/planer purposes. Of the two, I think you can make a miter slot jig pretty easily, but i dont know that the same can be said for the oneway. 

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You can check your slot parallelism with a simple combo square.  Marc's got a video somewhere in the archives.  You don't need any fancy devices for that.  Just make sure you're referencing off the same tooth front and back.

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I have the woodpecker gage your showing and a master plate like toms.

With the gage running in the miter slot I can check my fence for  humps or flatness.I also use the comb square method that was mentioned.

Aj

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I have one of these:

 

m.harborfreight.com/1-inch-travel-machinists-dial-indicator-623.html?utm_referrer=direct%2Fnot%20provided

 

With no stand. I make a scrap wood jig to hold it for whatever task I need. Works great, and is very versatile.

They carry stands / bases, as well.

 

A dial indicator is great for checking things that rotate, like saw arbors, or pulleys.

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My two cents :

Don't choose digital. Of course it does not matter for the table saw set up, but a dial indicator is a lifetime tool. You would probably use it all over the shop or for occasional mechanics. Digital is definitely unreadable if you try to set up a rotary tool (drill press, etc.) : numbers are changing so quickly that you cannot figure out in what range you are. The needle is less precise but it shows the amplitude of movement, and your eye is able to read an average value. The lack of precision is illusionary because the dial indicator shows values within 10 microns (1/1000mm !). It exceeds any woodworker's needs.

I use the same methods as @gee-dub. I bought also a machinist trusty block and a magnetic base for the dial indicator. The next measuring tool you will want is a machinist level which is sadly more expensive, but it's another lifetime tool...

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And to throw another in your pile, IMO the best option out there is the Betterley UNA-Gauge: LINK LINK

It does more than any other and is very useful for calibrating almost every machine in the shop.

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