Janello

Dilemma - House sold - What to do next?

Recommended Posts

We had a 15' fiberglass boat that was rated for a 75 hp. When the 50 hp threw a rod my Dad went looking for a new motor. The 80 hp and the 100 were so close in price guess what he got ? That little boat would fly, sometimes literally. We had to repair some cracks and brace the transom after the first season and eventually got a slightly bigger boat.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a kid I took my stepdads small motor boat out while he was at work. I was out having fun until the motor fell off and sank to the bottom of the lake. I had to get that off my chest.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, wdwerker said:

We had a 15' fiberglass boat that was rated for a 75 hp. When the 50 hp threw a rod my Dad went looking for a new motor. The 80 hp and the 100 were so close in price guess what he got ? That little boat would fly, sometimes literally. We had to repair some cracks and brace the transom after the first season and eventually got a slightly bigger boat.

On my friend's boat, that I was talking about, we beefed up the transom and added a bulkhead in front of the engine well that went all the way to the tops of the gunwales, and welded up a ski pylon out of steel.  The ski pylon bolted to the motor mount bolts, and attached to the bulkhead in front of the engine well.  It was plenty strong when we got through with it.   In the '60's, anyone who was serious about waterskiing had at least double the rated hp on their beefed up boats.  It sat low in the back when it was empty, but the bulkhead kept water out of the boat.

There wan't much difference in weight in those V-4's.

He and I both wish that he had never sold that boat.   His ride is a 40 foot sailboat now, sitting in a slip near his house.

The last outboard I drove had four 350's on it.  The owner is a friend of mine, and he wanted me to go out with him the first time.  That's a lot of outboard horsepower, but the boat was big, and heavy.   His smile was a lot bigger than mine, which was a good thing.  I used to hear people say that an outboard left a trail of dollar bills.   That thing left a trail of hundreds.

My Wife likes kayaks.   She just bought a Hobie with the pedal drive.  It surprised me how fast, and easily it moves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He had a plaque with a fist sized chunk of broken fiberglass on it. That was all that was left of the boat they flipped. It was engraved "A Survivor " and the date & Ixtapa Mexico.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Eric. said:

I have a canoe.  It's powered by a middle-aged guy.  And it only likes to go in one direction, generally.  But it's maintenance free and it hauls more beer than I can drink in a weekend.

Now... I don't believe that engine is truly maintenance free. And I certainly hope your fuel (beer) costs more per gallon that diesel :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, BonPacific said:

Now... I don't believe that engine is truly maintenance free. And I certainly hope your fuel (beer) costs more per gallon that diesel :)

 

Actually, if you float the right rivers you're not really an engine at all...just a rudder.  Most of our streams in the Ozarks have enough current that you never really have to paddle if you don't want to, except for course correction or stopping at a gravel bar.  There's some frog water (that's hillbilly for dead pools) in the lower stretches of most rivers...but those sections are never as desirable for scenery or fishing so I don't float them anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Eric. said:

Actually, if you float the right rivers you're not really an engine at all...just a rudder.  Most of our streams in the Ozarks have enough current that you never really have to paddle if you don't want to, except for course correction or stopping at a gravel bar.  There's some frog water (that's hillbilly for dead pools) in the lower stretches of most rivers...but those sections are never as desirable for scenery or fishing so I don't float them anyway.

Hillbilly?  Frogwater is also an expression used by slalom kayakers/c1'ers, but they do paddle their boats - mostly upstream or to catch an eddy!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pondhockey said:

Hillbilly?  Frogwater is also an expression used by slalom kayakers/c1'ers, but they do paddle their boats - mostly upstream or to catch an eddy!

Didn't know that.  I just figured it was an Ozarks word.  I've had a number of people confused when I said it...but maybe they just don't know much about streams generally.

I hate frog water.  It's work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boat- a hole in the water into which you pour enormous sums of money.

The two happiest days in a boat owners life- when he buys a boat and when he sells the boat.

I had a bass boat but sold it about 12 years ago.  Too many people on the water that don't know the rules for safe boating.  Anyone should keep their tools as you would regret selling them down the road.  I have sold some things that now sell for 3 to 4 times the cost of my original item.  Can't afford to replace them now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel if he would like to do something different with his time and sell his tools than enjoy your boat.     Best of all its something you can do with your wife and kids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/4/2017 at 9:06 PM, Eric. said:

...

I hate frog water.  It's work.

Especially with the usual upstream breeze in the afternoon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to derail back to OP, but I have been in the bush. Why don't long term stor-ers buy cosmoline? It is a pain to remove, but would remove all concern. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had all my tools in garage storage for 4 years, 3 of them in Louisiana! I treated all the cast iron with Boshield and paste wax as my regular maintenance.  After 4 years in uncontrolled climate storage everything came out mostly rust free and the small amount of rust was easy to remove.  I thought about selling my tools before moving from WA state to LA but I am so glad I didn't do it!  I finally ended up semi-retired in Idaho and with my 30'x40' shop which will last me until I can't woodwork anymore!  I had a 24' power boat, loved it but it is long gone now but the tools will be with me forever!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now