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00101

Is this normal?

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Is it normal that when you rip something with the table saw that on one of the two pieces there are a ton of blade marks all at different depths and burning? This is only on one side too, which makes me think this is weird... I've got some pics of the piece I just did, I'm not too sure on how well you'll be able to see what I'm talking about, but better than nothing I guess.

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So some burn can happen with woods like Maple and Cherry especially if you have a slow feed rate, but nothing like that.

Looks like the fence isn't parallel, like Tom pointed out, but it could also be a dull blade and having your blade too low. You have it pretty low. Try raising it so it goes about an inch above the board (if you feel safe with that). As low as you have it, I'd expect burn on Maple.

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Its a brand new blade, like the 5th cut, so I doubt its dull, also I always put the blade high enough such that the gullet (the dip in between the teeth, not sure if that's what its called) is slightly above the piece. The wood is hickory. I've also found that the fence slopes towards the blade by about 1/64 or something really small, as the lowest rule I have is only a 1/32 I didn't measure it, but it was very small so I'm not sure if that amount would cause that kind of burning and scoring.

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So try it again but with the blade raised higher. Hickory is hard though I've never tinkered with it. Don't know your feed rate, but keep it moving at a steady pace and not too slowly.

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Okay, I'll try to move a little faster I guess, I'll also try to raise the blade a little more as well. So the tiny bit its off is not the the cause though, right?

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If it is so small you can't measure it, it is unlikely to bother a sharp blade. You should be able to feel a pinch if it is there (or bind if the wood is pinching the back of the blade). If the wood is pinching, it will cause those circular scoring marks. That the blade is so low will greatly increase the chances of burning.

Does your fence move at all during the cut?

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Are you using a Freud Glue Line Rip blade? If so, very slight measurements out of parallel will cause burning like that in maple and cherry. Check parallel and correct that and use a faster, even, feed rate. Not stop and go.

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Get the fence as parallel as you can.

Some other questions might include:

Are you sure it is the correct type of blade? How many teeth?

Is the wood completely dry? - Sometimes wet wood is trying to warp, and when you release the inner tension by ripping it, the wood will try to pull itself back together and pinch the blade?

Are you using a splitter or riving knife?

After all of that I guess my only question is How good are you with a hand plane to clean up that edge?

Good luck. Don't give up.

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Its a 40-tooth combination blade; I didn't have the splitter on at the time; I don't have a hydrometer so I don't know how wet the wood is and it did warp when I was cutting it, though it was away from the blade; and as far as I can tell the fence remains stationary, however I have not actively looked for such a phenomenon.

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If one side of the cut warped away from the blade, the other side likely warped towards the fence and was pushing the stock into the blade laterally.

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I had a similar problem with a brand new 40 tooth Frude combo blade in poplar a few months back. The blade had a slight warp in it causing it to leave burn marks and the different depths of cut just like in your photos. So if you haven't checked that, it might be worth checking your blade with a strightedge.

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If one side of the cut warped away from the blade, the other side likely warped towards the fence and was pushing the stock into the blade laterally.

I think this is the most probable cause.

Nate

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Not sure what's causing the problem, But whenever I've a similar problem, I usually just cut my boards about 1/16" wider than I need. Then I go back and re-cut them to the right dimension.

This works well because on the second cut, the blade is only taking off a sliver, so you can feed the board fast to prevent burning, etc.

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Hmm, I'll have to check out the blade I guess. On an unrelated note, I just sliced my finger on my plane blade, It was so sharp that I didn't even feel it happen until 3-4 minutes later and cannot see the cut unless I pull the skin apart, and yet the plane still struggles on the lightest of passes, is this just my technique? Also paper cuts don't have anything on plane blade cuts, stings like hell!

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Is it normal that when you rip something with the table saw that on one of the two pieces there are a ton of blade marks all at different depths and burning? This is only on one side too, which makes me think this is weird... I've got some pics of the piece I just did, I'm not too sure on how well you'll be able to see what I'm talking about, but better than nothing I guess.

alignment, feed rate, or blade alignment

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Royal, since 00101's problem seems to be isolated to this one time and stress being released from the stock is clearly part of the scenario the answer to his problem may be way different than yours. I just don't want to see you get frusterated trying to get your saw cutting right. Have you watched Marc's video's 55 and 56? I have found that it is sometimes best when you are having problems to tune the whole thing up and then check your results. After you get it running perfect and get used to it being that way it is then easier to diagnosis the little adjustments that need to be made, when now you may actually be dealing with 2, 3, or 4 different things it really becomes an uphill battle. Please let us know how you turn out!

Nate

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One thing to remember about your cut is that you very likely moved your finger along the blade so it could cut. When planing, you are pushing the blade into the material. While you can get it sharp enough to cut you when you press lightly into the blade, you don't need it very sharp at all if you move your finger along the blade.

As for the struggle, the mouth position will make a difference, but a bigger culprit if you don't know is the backlash in the blade depth screw. Try this: back out the blade until it is definitely inside the throat. Put it on the edge of a board and slowly advance the screw until you start getting dust. From there, a half or full turn should give you a nice thing shaving. If the shaving is a bit rough, you likely need to close the mouth. You should always position the blade by advancing it and stopping where you want it. If you retract the blade with the screw, when the blade catches the wood, it will slide up a bit (a function of the screw's backlash) and it will form a wedge with the cut it started. At that point, you are trying to take a shaving by literally lifting and ripping off a shaving (albiet from a close distance). Avoid the backlash for a solid cut.

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Real bad burning is almost always an alignment or feed rate issue. Check your alignment. When I see really bad burn like that, I'm worried things are off by so much that the spliiter isn't really protecting you from kickback.

Once that is done, Speed up the feed, if your saw can handle that. Make sure you are not stopping the piece midway through the cut at all. Your feed should be smooth, safe, consistent, and (for quick burn woods) as fast as the saw will allow you to make it.

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I have to second what Jonathan and others have said. In my experience, blade alignment has been an issue, but something that is easily corrected. Dull blade? Easily resolved. The more difficult problem for me was that my saw is a little underpowered and I ran the shop vac at the same time on the same circuit. I couldn't feed the workpiece fast enough because the saw couldn't take it. So the piece stayed alongside the blade for too long and got burned. I added another couple of circuits and switched the shop vac over. Problem solved.

Jack

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