Dhankx

Storing of respirator?

Recommended Posts

That filter that you linked is called a stacked (some call them piggy back) filter.  It has an organic vapor cartridge as well as a hepa cartridge.  It will do both but, it's also more difficult to breath through and the OV portion will go bad long before the hepa portion does.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 2 like this, you than just put on the filters you need for the job.  I use giant pink filters for wood, and than what I guess you could call cartridges for vapor, it also has a soft filter that goes on top of the cartridge to stop larger particles.  

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B008MCUS28/ref=psdc_2257619011_t2_B00009363G

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, JosephThomas said:

I have the same moisture problems described above, and it only takes 10-15 minutes to develop on the hotter days. I've had a couple different kinds of respirators, and I'm in a fairly dry climate (it is pretty hot though). I figure it was just a little different for each person (I sweat quite easily on those hot days too).

 

12 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

I'm sure the respiratory moisture is a tiny fraction. I perspire heavily in the non-climate-controlled workshop. And humidity is pretty high here most of the year. I have the same issue with respirators at work.

On the rare occasion I am called to diagnose control system failures on the overhead cranes in the furnace area of the plant, I sometimes have to empty my mask before I reach the top of the stairs to the catwalk (75'). Of course, the ambient temp hits 160F at times ...

 

Well, Sweat is one thing, respiratory moisture is another.   If your sweat is filling your mask too quickly, then congratulations, that's step one on joining the "Big Guy Club".   Sweat is 'collected' separately from the breath, and if that's collecting, there's not much you can do about it.   If it's collecting in the area sealed off for your breath, then you need to explore other options in mask design (PAPR for example). 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, TIODS said:

That filter that you linked is called a stacked (some call them piggy back) filter.  It has an organic vapor cartridge as well as a hepa cartridge.  It will do both but, it's also more difficult to breath through and the OV portion will go bad long before the hepa portion does.  

Unless you are dealing with acids or ammonia or other organic vapors, there is no reason to get the hybrid filter.   Get a set of dust only filters, and a set of filters for finishing.  You are rarely if ever doing both in the home shop (creating dust and vapors), so there is no reason to make yourself work a bit harder, aside from a bit of cost.  Note though, most finishing filters (those intended for painters and the like), are not the same as an organic vapor filter, which is the most common form of a hybrid filter. Finishing filters are designated as such, "painters" or "finishers" filters, while organic vapor filters are called just that. 

Personally, at home, once I stopped trying to anodize my own aluminum parts with pure sulfuric acid (don't ask), I have no need for an organic vapor filter.  I only use the dust filters, and have never been happier while wearing a respirator.  Not that one can ever really be happy while wearing one.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Marmotjr said:

Unless you are dealing with acids or ammonia or other organic vapors, there is no reason to get the hybrid filter.   Get a set of dust only filters, and a set of filters for finishing.  You are rarely if ever doing both in the home shop (creating dust and vapors), so there is no reason to make yourself work a bit harder, aside from a bit of cost.  Note though, most finishing filters (those intended for painters and the like), are not the same as an organic vapor filter, which is the most common form of a hybrid filter. Finishing filters are designated as such, "painters" or "finishers" filters, while organic vapor filters are called just that. 

Personally, at home, once I stopped trying to anodize my own aluminum parts with pure sulfuric acid (don't ask), I have no need for an organic vapor filter.  I only use the dust filters, and have never been happier while wearing a respirator.  Not that one can ever really be happy while wearing one.   

Accurate info!  Hepa filters do about 90% of what a wood shop needs.  I do drop in OV cartridges when shooting Lacquer but, toss them after because I don't shoot lacquer very often.

It's just not worth the added extra cost for the stacked filters because the OV portion of the filter doesn't last long enough to be useful.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, TIODS said:

 I do drop in OV cartridges when shooting Lacquer but, toss them after because I don't shoot lacquer very often.

You might be surprised at how long they will last. I've had OV cartridges last for several years by keeping them sealed up. I don't spray, but whenever I use a rattle can I put em on. There's no mistaking when they go bad.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, drzaius said:

You might be surprised at how long they will last. I've had OV cartridges last for several years by keeping them sealed up. I don't spray, but whenever I use a rattle can I put em on. There's no mistaking when they go bad.

Exactly!  Check the info for the manufacturers recommended exposure time before replacement.  It's usually around one work shift, or about 8-10 hours.  Sometimes more, sometimes less.  That's 8 hours hours of active use in a hazardous environment.  How long does it take you to apply a coat of finish?  Not 8 hours I hope.  You can probably do an entire large project at home, all coats, with one set of filters. A set of filters should last you several smaller projects, at the very least.    But the best way to know if they need changed is by the effort required to breathe.  If you start feeling winded after wearing a mask for a bit, it may be time to swap it out.    When it feels like breathing is more work than the work itself, something's amiss. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd add some info, but the guys above covered pretty much all of it.

I use a 3M half face mask (7503) with the pink P100 filters (2907). That's all I use when making dust. I don't spray lacquer or anything really nasty so no need for a lot of O-chem filter use. I had the P100 filters on a subscribe & save through Amazon for a while so I have a nice stockpile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Marmotjr said:

But the best way to know if they need changed is by the effort required to breathe.

With the OV cartridges, it's more a matter of just changing out the cartridges when you can start to smell the offending vapor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.