Eric.

you know it's gonna be a boring week

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11 minutes ago, bgreenb said:

@shaneymack:  true story, @Eric. let me know yesterday that he had to scribe a window sill to fit an out of square opening, so he took it to his bandsaw and then jointed the cut edge.

As my father in law said to me when I was shimming a piece of subfloor because it was out of level by 1/8" over 8':  "Brian you're not hand cutting dovetails.  You're laying subfloor.  Nail it off and go get the next sheet so we can eat lunch sometime today."

haha-shut-up.gif

 

But trim work lands somewhere between dovetails and sub-floor, no? :huh:

 

Those foundation windows were a little jacked and it took some time to fit everything.  I've been sailing right along since then.  But ain't no way this would ever be a one day project for me.  Keep in mind Shane that I have to paint and caulk all this crap, too.

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3 minutes ago, Eric. said:

But trim work lands somewhere between dovetails and sub-floor, no? :huh:

:)

Yes, just busting balls.  

(Still, the jointer was a bit much :) )

 

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I used a jointer when I framed houses-after building the garage first.  Trim was always painted before being put up.  That way, there was no cutting in edges, or floors, and only the faces, where nails were, needed any more paint.  

I don't understand why caulking is needed with trim. but I did the whole job from the footings up.

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39 minutes ago, Tom King said:

I don't understand why caulking is needed with trim.

Because I'm not as good as you. :D

I'm painting all the trim in batches before I put it up.  I'll do some touching up after brad holes are filled and slop is fixed with caulk.  But yeah...painting everything after it's installed...no thanks.

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3 hours ago, Eric. said:

Keep in mind Shane that I have to paint and caulk all this crap, too

Ya this is no fun. I'm no painter that for sure. I can caulk a finish job in pretty good time though. 

 

42 minutes ago, Tom King said:

I don't understand why caulking is needed with trim.

Depends what kind of trim you are referring to. When installing plain old paint grade trim it requires latex caulk. The job looks sloppy and unfinished if not. I'm talking about where the moldings meet the wall, not poorly cut joints. I can cope the entire job or have the most air tight miters but the ever so thin gap where the moulding meets the wall look like crap imo without latex. With high quality stain grade trim, I totally agree with you, no caulk needed. But that's  a whole other beast. 

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3 hours ago, Eric. said:

Those foundation windows were a little jacked and it took some time to fit everything

I mark each end and drop the track saw on the lines in this situation. Works great. 

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7 minutes ago, shaneymack said:

Ya this is no fun. I'm no painter that for sure. I can caulk a finish job in pretty good time though. 

 

Depends what kind of trim you are referring to. When installing plain old paint grade trim it requires latex caulk. The job looks sloppy and unfinished if not. I'm talking about where the moldings meet the wall, not poorly cut joints. I can cope the entire job or have the most air tight miters but the ever so thin gap where the moulding meets the wall look like crap imo without latex. With high quality stain grade trim, I totally agree with you, no caulk needed. But that's  a whole other beast. 

Yeah exactly, this is your standard primed pine trim, all painted white.  This house just ain't square enough to make everything fit perfect...and god knows I'm trying.  Caulk to the rescue...I ain't above it. :)

6 minutes ago, shaneymack said:

I mark each end and drop the track saw on the lines in this situation. Works great. 

Yep that would a great way to approach it.  But I was too lazy to get the TS out of the systainer.  So instead I did twice the work with the bandsaw and jointer. LOL

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35 minutes ago, shaneymack said:

I mark each end and drop the track saw on the lines in this situation. Works great. 

Same here - exactly the method I recommended to Eric :)

(and if it's a curved scribe, out comes the carvex...)

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(That being said, I did say that if my bandsaw were right upstairs like Eric's was I may use it just to avoid getting out the TS and dirtying the work area). 

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35 minutes ago, bgreenb said:

 

(and if it's a curved scribe, out comes the carvex...)

Or a tapered scribe free hand on the jobsite table saw. Shhhh, don't tell the internet safety police fairies, they will get upset with me. 

 

...Obviously the tracksaw would work in this situation as well. Just saying, free hand on the table saw is even quicker  

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7 minutes ago, shaneymack said:

Or a tapered scribe free hand on the jobsite table saw. Shhhh, don't tell the internet safety police fairies, they will get upset with me. 

 

...Obviously the tracksaw would work in this situation as well. Just saying, free hand on the table saw is even quicker  

I'm not gonna lie...I stood there for like three seconds, board in hand, staring at the table saw.  It crossed my mind.  But then I did the right thing.

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27 minutes ago, Eric. said:

I'm not gonna lie...I stood there for like three seconds, board in hand, staring at the table saw.  It crossed my mind.  But then I did the right thing.

I should film my hardwood flooring installers cutting on their jobsite table saw. It'll give you the willies. 

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25 minutes ago, shaneymack said:

I should film my hardwood flooring installers cutting on their jobsite table saw. It'll give you the willies. 

So I'm gonna guess none of your guys are going to be featured in the manufacture's how to safely use a table saw videos!

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30 minutes ago, shaneymack said:

I should film my hardwood flooring installers cutting on their jobsite table saw. It'll give you the willies. 

They probably not only cut free hand tapers, but push them through so hard they bog the saw down, all while their fingers are 1 inch from the blade. I've seen this awesome to watch reckless behavior before!

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1 hour ago, shaneymack said:

Or a tapered scribe free hand on the jobsite table saw. Shhhh, don't tell the internet safety police fairies, they will get upset with me. 

 

...Obviously the tracksaw would work in this situation as well. Just saying, free hand on the table saw is even quicker  

I know I'm dense and now y'all know it too. What type of trim are you speaking of? I have to put down a bunch of baseboard after our floor goes back in and if there's a better way than miters, I'd like to know about it. Aside from coping. These things are 16' (I think, or close) and I can't imagine using a ts. Pics or video of the process would help. Thanks

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One end of the baseboard butts into a corner, the other end gets coped. You cut a miter on the board then cope with a saber saw from the backside at a slight back angle. Coping base is a breeze compared to crown. Outside corners get mitered, sometimes bisected angle is a more accurate description.

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Scribing the base to an uneven floor. Sometimes coping the base to fit over a dip or hump in the floor.  Over tile a world of sin can be covered with shoe molding. Coping shoe can be harder than coping base.

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I was actually talking about scribing a sill to a window opening that wasn't perfectly square...like on one side it was 6.25" and the other side was 6.5".  So the sill board has to be cut at a slight angle to fit the opening.  Salty old pros will just strike a line and freehand that cut on a table saw.  Because they be all casual with their hot dog meat.  I'm not on the clock so I prefer the safer and slightly slower method.

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10 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

Scribing the base to an uneven floor. Sometimes coping the base to fit over a dip or hump in the floor.  Over tile a world of sin can be covered with shoe molding. Coping shoe can be harder than coping base.

Sorry, I thought you were talking about the corners. If the tile guys can't lay a flat surface, then there goes their retainage! 

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I'm currently working my 7th 12-13 hour shift in a row, with two regular 10 hour days before that.  Just six more days to go! 

I wish I was throwing up some baseboard.  

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58 minutes ago, bleedinblue said:

I wish I was throwing up some baseboard.  

If you wanna do mine I'll be happy to carry your sidearm around for a day.  I'll even wear my aviators. :D

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