Valerie

Beautiful oak

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Usually the value of trees from residential areas is poor. The cost of taking down the trees far exceeds the value of the timber. Many mills refuse to cut residential trees due to the chance of hitting a nail which ruins expensive teeth on the blade. Firewood is probably the eventual use of most trees like yours. Oak is not a particularly expensive wood, even residential walnut trees don't bring much money.

I wish you luck !

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If you're in Seattle, you could try calling Urban Hardwoods. Their thing is harvesting urban trees for use in furniture building. I don't know what the cost would be, but as Steve said, an urban oak isn't worth much, so I'm sure they'd want some money.

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1 minute ago, C Shaffer said:

If that bole transition is burl...

It definitely is, and whoever takes that tree can go ahead and ship me that.

The rest of it isn't worth much.  I doubt you'll have any luck getting someone to remove that tree for the value of a couple oak logs.  Oak isn't worth much these days, especially red oak.  And IMO it would be a sin to cut those trees down anyway unless they're posing some danger to your house.

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I don't know where you are, but the bark looks like Sweet Gum to me.  I can't enlarge any of the leaf pictues to be able to tell for sure.  The bad thing about Sweet Gum is that it's not worth anything, even for firewood.  The good thing about it is that I don't ever remember seeing one blow down, or break.    Oak trees stand mainly by balance, but Sweet Gum trees send roots everywhere, and are very tenacious.  I've never seen one upended.

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31 minutes ago, Tom King said:

I don't know where you are, but the bark looks like Sweet Gum to me.

I agree, the one with the burl at the base.  That bark appears to be too deeply corrugated for any of the oaks.

I see several different species in those pics.  The one hanging over the house does appear to be some type of red oak - possibly pin oak - though usually the lower branches are droopier than that if left unpruned.

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PIn Oaks send roots all over the neighborhood too, and aren't as much of a worry of blow over as other, more common Oaks.  Our house is mostly under the canopy of Pin Oaks, so I know them well.  

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Pin oaks fight back ! Prune those droopy lower branches and the tree just swings the ones above them down to poke you in the face once again.

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33 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

Pin oaks fight back ! Prune those droopy lower branches and the tree just swings the ones above them down to poke you in the face once again.

I worked for a tree service for a while when I was a youngster, and man those pin oaks are an absolute bitch.  They're hard and wiry and twisted all to hell, and when you send them through the chipper the feed rollers will catch a bend in the branch and whip the piss out of your face. LOL  I hated pin oak days.

Sweetgums were the best.  They were a little heavy but they were soft and fed through the chipper nice and straight and they chipped like butter.

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I had to fix a broken water line a few weeks ago.  A Pin Oak root the size of my forearm pushed it apart.  That root went forty feet out from under the edge of the canopy of the tree, turned the corner of the house, and went another 24 feet.   I put the house here 37 years ago.   Sure provides great shade though.

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